Using the Forecasting System to Assess the Risk of Head Scab

Pierce 1By: Pierce Paul, OSU Extension

The head scab risk tool can be used to assess the risk of head scab and to help guide fungicide application decisions. Here are a few guidelines for using the system and interpret the output:

1.) Go to the website at www.wheatscab.psu.edu. You will see a map of the United States with some states in green, yellow, red, or gray.

2.) STOP. Before you try to interpret the map, make sure that you select:Pierce 2

  1. The flowering (anthesis) date for your field,
  2. Winter wheat (the class of wheat we grow in Ohio), and
  3. The susceptibility of the variety planted in your field.

3.) Zoom in to Ohio and move the “Counties” slider over to the right to see county lines.

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4). Zoom in further to your county and move the “Streets” slider over to the right to see major highways.

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5.) Find the approximate location of your field and assess the risk for head scab (*susceptible variety):

    1. Scab susceptible soft red winter wheat variety planted in my field in Wooster, OH.
    2. Flowering on May 26, 2020.

*Map is red in the area of my field, meaning that scab risk is high.

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6.) Find the approximate location of your field and assess the risk for head scab (**moderately resistant variety):

  1. Moderately resistant soft red winter wheat variety planted in my field in Wooster, OH.
  2. Flowering today, May 26.

**Map is green in the area of my field, meaning that scab risk is low.

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Continue to use the tool to monitor the risk of the head scab over the next several days as more fields in the northern half of the state approach anthesis. If the risk is moderate-high (the map is yellow or red) at the time of flowering, you should consider applying Prosaro, Caramba, or Miravis Ace, at anthesis (flowering) or within the first 4-6 days after flowering. Learn how to identify the flowering or anthesis growth stage here:

CFAP Direct Support Webinar

Listen to the recording Ben Brown and Dianne Shoemaker for a webinar on “Navigating Direct Support for Ohio’s Farmers and Ranchers” recorded on May 27, 2020, with Ohio FSA Director Leonard Hubert.  Go here to access the recorded webinar, here for webinar handouts and here to access the CFAP fact sheet. 

Additionally, here is the national website from FSA for the CFAP program which includes a link to the calculator. https://www.farmers.gov/cfap?fbclid=IwAR36XOa1V8FtSWpNsUMCtKqlnk7u8LZRYWArbwqRv0YjlHaV-h0wyA8VW9Y

Learn about the CFAP Program

OSU Extension is pleased to be sponsoring two events to help Ohio farmers learn more about the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP).  Join us:

Wednesday, May 27 from 9:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Join OSU Extension’s Ben Brown and Dianne Shoemaker for a webinar on “Navigating Direct Support for Ohio’s Farmers and Ranchers” on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 at 9:30 am with special guest, Ohio Farm Service Agency Director Leonard Hubert.  This webinar is generously produced and distributed by Ohio Ag Net.  The webinar will be available for viewing at https://farmoffice.osu.edu/, or through Ohio Ag Net’s Facebook Live Video.

 

Thursday, May 28 from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m.

OSU Extension is pleased to be offering a “Farm Office Live” session on Thursday morning, May 28 from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m.  The session will begin with the Farm Office Team answering questions asked over the past 2 weeks.  Topics to be highlighted include Updates on the CARES Act, Payroll Protection Program, Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL), and Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP).  Participants can pre-register or join in on Thursday morning at  https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive

Farmers and 1099 filers might qualify for new COVID-19 unemployment benefits program

by: Peggy Kirk Hall

Farmers aren’t traditionally eligible for unemployment benefits, but that won’t be the case when Ohio’s newest unemployment program opens.   We’ve been keeping an eye out for the opening of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, which will provide unemployment benefits to persons affected by COVID-19.  The program is targeted to persons who are not eligible for regular unemployment benefits, such as self-employed and 1099 filers.   PUA is yet another economic assistance program generated by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act recently passed by Congress. Continue reading

Being and Maintaining an Economically Resilient Farm

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County

The word “resilience” is used often in the agricultural press.  What does this mean?  Merriam-Webster defines resilience as:

  1. The capability of a strained body to recover its size and shape after deformation caused especially by compressive stress.
  2. An ability to recover from or adjust to misfortune or change.

We often see resilience used in agriculture when discussing climate and weather.  There is documented evidence of weather changes that have impacted agriculture, and farmers have done their best to adapt to these changes.  Examples include building soil health, managed grazing, the use of cover crops, water management strategies, technology adoption, and more.

Resilience can also be used when discussing the economics of agriculture and the resulting effects.  It is no surprise to anyone in agriculture that people are strained, are experiencing stress, and are trying to adjust to new and different ways of operating. Continue reading

Sign up for USDA-CFAP Direct Support to Begin May 26, 2020

Ben Brown, Peggy Kirk Hall, David Marrison, Dianne Shoemaker, and Barry Ward
The Ohio State University

Since the enactment of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act on March 27, 2020, and the announcement of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) on April 17, 2020, producers in Ohio and across the country have been anxiously awaiting additional details on how the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) will provide financial assistance for losses experienced as a result of lost demand, short-term oversupply and shipping pattern disruptions caused by COVID-19.

The additional details on CFAP eligibility, payment limitations, payment rates, and enrollment timeline arrived on May 19, 2020, when the USDA issued its Final Rule for CFAP.  In this article, we explain the Final Rule in this issue of News from the Farm Office. Continue reading

Maximize your Ag Tech – Tri-State Precision Ag Webinar on June 23

By:  Stephanie Karhoff

Get the most out of your Ag Tech this year by joining experts from Ohio State University, Michigan State University, and Purdue University for the 2020 Tri-State Precision Ag Day via online webinar on June 23 at 6:00 p.m. Learn more about drone imaging, calibrating yield monitors, on-farm research, and emerging technologies.

Topics and speakers include:

Hype from Reality
Dr. John Fulton, Associate Professor, The Ohio State University

Get the Most out of Ag Tech with On-Farm Research
Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins, Field Specialist, The Ohio State University

Yield Monitor Calibration
Ricardo Costa, Extension Educator, Michigan State University

Aerial Imagery Options
Crystal Van Pelt, Extension Educator, Purdue University

Register for the webinar at go.osu.edu/TriStatePrecisionAg. Contact Agriculture & Natural Resources Extension Educator Stephanie Karhoff at 419-636-5608 or karhoff.41@osu.edu for more information.

Ohio Corn, Soybean and Wheat Enterprise Budgets – Projected Returns for 2020

By Barry Ward

COVID-19 has created an unusual situation that has negatively affected crop prices and lowered certain crop input costs. Many inputs for the 2020 production year were purchased or the prices/costs were locked in prior to the spread of this novel coronavirus. Some costs have been recently affected or may yet be affected. Lower fuel costs may allow for lower costs for some compared to what current budgets indicate.

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be largely unchanged from last year with lower fertilizer expenses offset by slight increases in some other costs. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2020 are projected to range from $359 to $452 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2020 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $201 to $223 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2020 are projected to range from $162 to $198 per acre. Continue reading

Choosing The Right Nitrogen Rate For Corn Is Important To Profitability

Nitrogen (N) rate on-farm trial in the field with hog manure applied in early August the previous year. The 16-row strips that are the most yellow-green only received 30 lbs N / acre as a starter fertilizer and no sidedress N application. The economic optimum N rate for the trial turned out to be 147 total lbs of N applied per acre, with an average yield of 234 bushels/acre. The photo was taken on 14 August. (Source: Bob Nielsen, DJI Zenmuse X4S camera on DJI Matrice 200 UAV at 400 ft flight altitude.)

By: Jim Camberato and Bob Nielsen Purdue University

Although nitrogen (N) fertilizer can be costly, it is needed to optimize profit in Indiana cornfields. Applying too little N reduces profit by reducing grain yield. Too much N does not return value and can also damage the environment.

Results from 167 field-scale N response trials conducted over more than 10 years underpin current region-based N recommendations. These data-driven N recommendations replaced the old yield-goal based system1, which was proven ineffective. Current recommendations represent the N rate for maximum profit over the long-term, but differences in soil type, management, and weather can result in lower or higher N requirements in any given situation. Rainfall after N application will primarily determine the efficiency of applied N2, with excessive rainfall causing higher N loss and greater need for fertilizer N.  Although N applied prior to planting this season has not been subject to conditions promoting N loss in most areas of Indiana, N loss can occur season-long, particularly prior to the V8 growth stage when corn N uptake and water use are relatively low. Continue reading

OSU Aquatic Ecosystems Program to Host Weekly Virtual Pond Clinic

Do you have a pond management question? Then, join Eugene C. Braig on Tuesdays from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. via Zoom for a virtual pond clinic. Eugene is the Program Director of the School of Environment and Natural Resources’ Extension Aquatic Ecosystems Program. He will be available to answer your question(s) online on an individual basis. There may be a short wait time, depending on the volume of questions for a given week. See below for instructions to access the Zoom meeting. Continue reading

USDA Coronavirus Food Assistance Program

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County &  Mike Estadt, Extension Educator, ANR, Pickaway County

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) is part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, and other USDA authorities to provide $16 billion in support to farmers impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.  The program is available to all farmers, regardless of size, who suffered an eligible loss. Included in the program is $3 billion that will go toward purchases of commodities for distribution by food banks and faith-based programs through the Farmers to Families Food Box Program. USDA announced $1.2 billion in contracts for that program last week. Continue reading

Expect Higher Solvency Rates on Farms in 2020

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County

The United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service (USDA-ERS) collects and summarizes an incredible amount of data about farm financial conditions.  This article will discuss solvency and solvency ratios of U.S. farms.

Solvency is a measure of the ability of a farm to satisfy its debt obligations when due and is measured using the debt-to-equity ratio and debt-to-asset ratios.  These ratios help determine whether, if your farm were sold, all debts would be paid.

The U.S. farm sector debt-to-equity (D/E) and debt-to-asset (D/A) ratios are expected to continue increasing. In 2020, ERS forecasts a debt-to-equity ratio of 15.7 percent, and a debt-to-asset ratio of 13.6 percent (Chart 1). These higher ratios indicate that more of the farm sector’s assets are financed by credit or debt relative to owner equity (D/E) and relative to total farm assets (D/A).  While not as high as the ratios experienced during the 1980s, the concern is that these ratios are rising. The impact of this year’s shelter-in-place restrictions due to COVID-19, and associated supply chain issues are not reflected in this ERS data. Continue reading

City quietly drops appeal of Lake Erie Bill of Rights ruling

By Tom Henry, The Toledo Blade, thenry@theblade.com

With little explanation, the city of Toledo has withdrawn its appeal of U.S. District Judge Jack Zouhary’s Feb. 27 ruling to invalidate the Lake Erie Bill of Rights.

In his eight-page ruling, Judge Zouhary said his decision to invalidate LEBOR was “not a close call.”

The ruling came on the one-year anniversary of a special February 2019, a special election which drew only 9 percent of the city’s registered voters. Of those, 61 percent approved a citizen-led referendum that called for amending the city’s charter. Continue reading

Farm Office Live Session Slated for Thursday, May 14 from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m.

OSU Extension is pleased to be offering a “Farm Office Live” session on Thursday morning, May 14 from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m.  Farmers, educators, and ag industry professionals are invited to log-on for the latest updates on the issues that impact our farm economy.

The session will begin with the Farm Office Team answering questions asked over the ten days.  Topics to be highlighted include:

  • Updates on the CARES Act, Payroll Protection Program, Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL), and Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) Update
  • Corn and soybean budgets
  • Supply and demand balance sheets
  • Other legal and economic issues

Plenty of time has been allotted for questions and answers from attendees. Each office session is limited to 500 people and if you miss the on-line office hours, the session recording can be accessed at farmoffice.osu.edu the following day.  Participants can pre-register or join in on Thursday morning at  https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive 

Direct Marketing of Meat

By: Rob Leeds, Garth Ruff, Peggy Hall, Jacci Smith, and Tony Nye, OSU Extension

Producers who are seeking to increase income are looking for different ways to market their livestock. Direct to consumer marketing of livestock products is one-way producers are seeking to increase profits in their livestock sales. When exploring direct market possibilities there are several factors farmers must consider: regulations, consumer preference, marketing strategies, and pricing. Continue reading

Message from The Nature Conservancy about a New Program for the Maumee Valley Watershed

From The Nature Conservancy Newsletter
We are looking for a diverse group of farmers; large acreage, small acreage, corn and soy, small grains, livestock, new and experienced who are willing to be trained to reach out and share their knowledge with other farmers.  “This is an opportunity for farmers to take the knowledge they’ve gained on their own farm and make an impact in a larger area.  We want people (farmers) who realize the importance of soil health goes beyond their own farms and who want to see farming be successful.  The future of farming depends on soil health,”  said Stephanie Singer, outreach education specialist at the Western Lake Erie Basin Project Office.  If you are interested in being part of this exciting farmer-led outreach project please complete the online Farmer Advocate for Conservation Application, Click Here!

Continue reading

What’s Annie’s Project – Join Us in a Virtual Reunion on May 6

Annie’s Virtual Reunion – Registration Open

Geared toward Women in Agriculture — Those who have participated in an Annie’s Project understand the camaraderie and friendships that are developed during the course. They also understand the value of education to improve the farm operation. Keeping those two points in mind, the Ohio Women in Ag team is hosting a virtual Annie’s Reunion on May 6 from 9-11 a.m.

The reunion will allow past participants to catch up with each other through virtual breakout rooms and further expand their education through 3 different tracts: Farm Management, Livestock, and Food. The opening session will provide resources and inspiration for the unique challenges farms are facing right now. Breakout sessions include grain and livestock market updates, backyard poultry, food prep and preservation, and more. Those who have not participated in an Annie’s Project are also invited to attend to learn more!

Registration is open until noon on May 5 at http://go.osu.edu/AnniesReunion. For questions, please contact Amanda Douridas at Douridas.9@osu.edu.

Those who have not had the opportunity to participate in an Annie’s Project are welcome to join us as well. Annie’s Project is a national program focused on farm management education for farm and ranch women. The course consists of 18 hours of education 5 risk areas: financial, human resources, legal, market, and production. For more information, visit https://www.anniesproject.org/. Contact Gigi Neal if interested in learning about upcoming programs at neal.331@osu.edu or 513-732-7070.

Interested in Soil Health? Learn together with OSU Extension

Improving soil health (SH) can provide a variety of benefits including improved water infiltration, increased water holding capacity, and increased nutrient availability. However, it can be challenging to quantify these benefits in the field.

In 2020, the eFields program is kicking off an effort to help better understand how management practices influence soil health and ultimately water quality. OSU Extension has worked to identify a few soil tests that can provide helpful indicators of improved soil health. Though several health tests exist, we focused on tests that are simple, economical, and repeatable. We are looking for farmers interested in soil health and who want to participate in a statewide field survey collecting soil health data from fields under various management practices, specifically conventional tillage, no-till, organic nutrient management, and cover cropping. The results from this effort will be used to guide recommendations for improving soil health on Ohio farms. Soil health indicators are also being added to selected eFields trials including nitrogen rate and manure sidedress.

If you are interested in learning more about participating in eFields trials focused on soil health, reach out to your local Extension educator or email digitalag@osu.edu. For more information about the soil health indicators and how to use them, visit: go.osu.edu/MeasureSH.