Purdue Corn and Soybean Monthly Outlook Webinar on Friday, May 14 – 12:30 – 1:30 PM

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Upcoming Webinar

MAY CORN & SOYBEAN OUTLOOK UPDATE WEBINAR

Time: 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EDT

Date: Friday, May 14, 2021

Join us for our free monthly corn and soybean outlook webinar series

Purdue ag economists Michael Langemeier, Nathanael Thompson, and James Mintert will host a free Corn and Soybean Outlook monthly webinar series for the remainder of 2021. Each webinar will follow the release of that month’s U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports. Continue reading

There’s Still Time to Enter the National Wheat Yield Contest!

By Eric Richer, OSU Extension Fulton County,

Many Ohio farmers are reporting good to excellent wheat ratings this spring. A couple good looking wheat with a nice run-up in price and this may be the year that you want to enter the National Wheat Yield Contest!

The contest is a friendly competition that will help farmers stay focused on raising high-quality, high-yielding wheat while evaluating agronomic and economic decisions at the field level.  Each registered contestant must be a member of their state’s wheat growers association (in Ohio, www.ohiocornandwheat.org). Contestants can enter more than one variety but each variety has an entry fee of $125.

Click here to review the rules and requirements for this year’s contest, and create your application to enter: https://yieldcontest.wheatfoundation.org/. May 15th at 5:00 pm EST is the last day to enter the contest.  The link to the rules and requirements can be accessed directly here: https://yieldcontest.wheatfoundation.org/Content/RulesPDF/NWYC%20Entry%20Harvest%20Rules.pdf

In Ohio, each district’s 1st and 2nd place winners will be recognized at the 2022 Celebration of Ohio Corn & Wheat and will receive recognition for themselves and their seed dealers.  The overall Ohio winner will a 1-year free lease on a seed tender from J & M Manufacturing.  The Ohio runner-up will receive free fungicide from BASF.  National winners traditionally receive a trip to the March 2022 Commodity Classic, which will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Alfalfa Weevil Infestations Becoming Severe in Some Fields

GDD

Figure 1: Accumulated growing degree days (base 48°F sine calculation method) for January 1- May 2, 2021, at several CFAES Ag Weather System (https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/) locations and additional NOAA stations around Ohio (data courtesy of the Midwestern Regional Climate Center (https://mrcc.illinois.edu).

By Mark SulcAaron WilsonKelley TilmonGreg LaBarge, CPAg/CCACurtis Young, CCAAndy MichelBeth Scheckelhoff

Alfalfa fields across Ohio have been observed with alfalfa weevil infestations, some with high numbers and severe feeding damage to the alfalfa.

Accumulation of heat units (growing degree days or GDDs) for alfalfa weevil growth have progressed across Ohio and are now in the 325 to 575 heat unit range indicative of peak larval feeding activity (Figure 1). We are about 2 weeks ahead of GDD weevil accumulation last year.

From the road, severe weevil feeding can look very much like frost injury (Figure 2). Do not be fooled, get out and scout! We have observed very minor frost injury to alfalfa from last week’s cold nights, so if you see “frost injury” in alfalfa, it is more likely to be severe alfalfa weevil feeding damage.  For more information on scouting and signs of damage, see the April 20 article in this newsletter: (https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/10-2021/alfalfa-weevil-%E2%80%93-it%E2%80%99s-closer-you-think). Continue reading

Wheat Between Feekes 8 and 10 and Disease Concerns

Septoria on wheat

Septoria on wheat

By: Pierce Paul, Maira Duffeck and Marian Luis

 

Wheat is now between Feekes 8 (flag leaf emergence) and Feekes 10 (boot) across the state. Feekes 8 marks the beginning of the period during which we recommend that you begin scouting fields to determine which disease is present and at what level. Septoria tritici leaf spot is usually one of the first to show up, and it has already been reported in some fields. So far, it is restricted to the lower leaves and severity is low in most of the affected fields. This disease is favored by cool (50-68F), rainy conditions, and although it usually develops early in the season, it really does not cause yield loss unless it reaches and damages the flag leaf before grain fill is complete. Continue reading

Are Periodical Cicadas a Threat to Field Crops?

Are periodical cicadas a threat to field crops? The quick and dirty answer to this question is NO. Are they a threat to the health and welfare of anything? There is no quick and dirty answer to this question.

The best way to answer the second question is to start by looking at what the periodical cicada is, what it feeds on, where one would expect to find them, and its life cycle.

The periodical cicada or 17-year cicada is an insect with an extremely long life cycle that takes 17 years to get from the egg stage to the adult stage. Some people mistakenly refer to this insect as a locust. Unfortunately, locusts and cicadas are not one-in-the-same.  Locusts are a type of grasshopper (Order Orthoptera).  Cicadas (Order Hemiptera) are not grasshoppers. And the 2 look nothing like one another.

grasshopper

Grasshoppers

Dog-day cicada Continue reading

Science for Success: Answering Soybean Questions

With funding from United Soybean Board, soybean agronomists across the U.S. are hosting a ‘Notes from the Field’ webinar series the first Friday of each month beginning May 7. Join research and extension specialists from Land Grant institutions for a monthly informal discussion on production topics of timely relevance. Bring your questions!

When:  May 7, June 4, July 9, and August 6 at 9:00 AM eastern time

Want to plug in:  Register to attend (via Zoom) for each monthly session and you will receive Zoom login information. Register at:
https://ncsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEkdeiqrTIqHNMYI3FuXRVPgsC87mavL6hs

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Lindsey (lindsey.233@osu.edu or 614-292-9080).

What Influences Soil Health? – Dig Deeper with eFields Soil Health Statewide Survey

99How do your soil type and past management practices influence soil health? Find out by participating in the eFields Soil Health Statewide Survey. For this trial, we are seeking fields with various management practices, including:

  • Long term no-till
  • Conventional tilled
  • Cover cropped (overwintering and winter-killed)
    • Cereal rye
    • Red clover
    • Oat/radish mix
  • Organic nutrients (manure) Continue reading

20th Annual Master Gardener Plant Sale held on Friday, May 14 and Saturday, May 15

Plants, plants, and more plants will be available at the 2021 Paulding County Master Gardener Volunteer plant sale on Friday, May 14th, 2021, from 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM and Saturday, May 15th from 8:00 AM until 12:00 PM. The sale will take place at the Paulding County fairgrounds inside the Block Building at 503 Fairground Drive, Paulding, OH 45879.

The sale will include perennials, annual flowers, herbs, vegetables, trees, and shrubs. Most items are between $1-$10 each. The proceeds from the sale will go back into the community Master Gardener Volunteer projects and programs. Past projects include trees for Oakwood Park and the Payne Park, planting the bed at the Reservoir Park, assisting with the landscaping at the Habitat for Humanity projects, plants for the fairgrounds and 4-H club projects, assisting the Friends of the Paulding Park Board, the native garden at the Black Swamp Nature Center, downtown Antwerp Village flowerpots, Fort Brown, and MGV memorial garden. Continue reading

Overholt Drainage School Virtual in 2021 -Free but Registration Required

Wed., June 9, 2021, 9 AM to 12 Noon. 

2021 Overholt Drainage Workshop Official Flyer – Announcement

Join OSU Extension for a webinar focused on drainage design, installation, and management including updates on recently passed H.B. 340 – Ohio’s “petition ditch laws” that address the installation and maintenance of drainage works of improvement in Ohio. A panel of professional engineers representing state and federal agencies, drainage contractors, and tile manufacturers will discuss some standard practices, common issues, and troubleshooting associated with drainage design, installation, and repairs.

The half-day webinar will feature a panel of professional engineers from state and federal agencies, drainage contractors, and tile manufacturers, who will discuss standard practices, common issues, and troubleshooting associated with drainage design, installation, and repairs. Dr. Peggy Kirk Hall, Agriculture Law field specialist, will provide an update on recently passed H.B. 340 – Ohio’s “petition ditch laws” that address the installation and maintenance of drainage works of improvement in Ohio. The event is supported by the Ohio Land Improvement Contractors of America – OLICA. Continue reading

New bulletins on personal guarantees and operating loans

Farms and financing–that’s a common combination in agriculture.  Because farm operators often use financing arrangements to fund the capital-intensive nature of farming, we created the Financing the Farm law bulletin series.  The series aims to help operators, especially new and beginning farmers, understand the legal workings of farm financing arrangements.

We’ve just added two new bulletins to the Financing the Farm series.  “Personal Guarantees and Agricultural Loans” address the legalities of a personal guarantee–a personal promise made by a third party to pay the loan if the borrower fails to do so.  We explain when lenders might require a personal guarantee for a loan, how a personal guarantee works, and issues and implications for entering into this type of agreement. Continue reading

Ohio Legislative Update: County Fair Funds, Water Quality Bonds, Animal-drawn Vehicles, Regulation, Broadband Services, Eminent Domain, Beginning Farmer Funds, Wind, Solar

Hopefully, Ohio’s planting season will soon be as busy as its legislative season.  There’s a lot of activity down at the capitol these days, with many bills on the move.  Here’s a summary of bills that could impact agriculture and rural communities. Note that the summary doesn’t include the budget bill, which we’ll address in a separate article.

Water quality bonds.  A joint resolution recently offered in the Senate supports amending Ohio’s Constitution to create permanent funds for clean water improvements.  S.J.R. 2, a bipartisan proposal from Theresa Gavarone (R-Bowling Green) and Kenny Yuko (D-Richmond Hts.) would place a ballot issue before voters in November.  The issue proposes amending the Constitution to allow for the issuance of general obligation bonds to fund clean water improvements.  Up to $1 billion over 10 years would be permissible, with no more than $100 million allocated in any fiscal year.  Bond funds would create a permanent source of funding for the H2Ohio program, which is now dependent upon the state budget process.

Continue reading

Federal bills target carbon reduction practices on farms and forests

President Biden announced a major goal this week–for the U.S. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by half over the next decade as compared to 2005 levels.  Agriculture will play a key role in that reduction by “deploying cutting-edge tools to make the soil of our heartland the next frontier in carbon innovation,” according to President Biden.  Several bills introduced in Congress recently could help agriculture fulfill that key role.  The proposals offer incentives and assistance for farmers, ranchers, and forest owners to engage in carbon sequestration practices.

Here’s a summary of the bills that are receiving the most attention.

Growing Climate Solutions ActS. 1251.  The Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee passed S. 1251 today.  The bipartisan proposal led by sponsors Sen. Mike Braun (R-IN), Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) already has the backing of over half of the Senate as co-sponsors, including Ohio’s Sen. Sherrod Brown.  The bill has come up in prior sessions of Congress without success, but the sponsors significantly reworked the bill and reintroduced it this week.  The new version includes these provisions: Continue reading

What Questions Should Farmers Ask about Selling Carbon Credits?

Originally Published in FarmDocDaily:  Sellars, S., G. Schnitkey, C. Zulauf, K. Swanson, and N. Paulson. “What Questions Should Farmers Ask about Selling Carbon Credits?.” farmdoc daily (11):59, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, April 13, 2021. Permalink

By: Sarah Sellars, Gary SchnitkeyKrista Swanson, and Nick Paulson, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois & Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics, The Ohio State University

Agricultural carbon markets exist through privately and publicly owned companies with aim to reduce carbon emissions through trade of carbon units sequestered at the farm level. The sale of carbon credits presents an opportunity for farmers to receive financial benefits from changing to more environmentally beneficial agricultural practices, although carbon prices may not currently be high enough to cover the cost of switching practices. Information about carbon markets can be challenging to navigate because each company typically has a different structure for payments, verification, and data ownership. This article provides a brief background about carbon markets, information about the breakeven price for carbon sequestration practices, and some questions for farmers to consider about selling carbon credits. Continue reading

Agronomy and Farm Management Podcast – Winter Impact on Cover Crops

Hosted by: Amanda Douridas and Elizabeth Hawkins, Ohio State University Extension

Agronomy and Farm Management PodcastAbout the Podcast:  Stay on top of what is happening in the field and the farm office. This podcast takes a bi-monthly dive into specific issues that impact agriculture, such as weather, land value, policies, commodity outlooks, and more. New episodes released every other Wednesday, subscribe at go.osu.edu/iTunesAFM or go.osu.edu/StitcherAFM

Episode 72 – Winter Impact on Cover Crops

April 14, 2021, (20 minutes)

Listen on: iTunes Stitcher

We have been monitoring different species of cover crops throughout the winter to see how each one breaks down or survives. If you are interested in planting cover crops but concerned about what spring planting conditions may be like, this is the podcast for you. Jason Hartschuh, Crawford County, and Mary Griffith, Madison County, join us as we hit a variety of cover crops and what they look like in April after the 2021 winter. To see the cover crops, visit youtube.com/c/OSUAgronomicCrops under the Cover Crops playlist. Let us know what you think about the podcast and suggest episode topics at go.osu.edu/afmsurvey

Paulding County Agricultural Scholarship from the Agronomy Committee

The Paulding County Agronomy Committee is pleased to offer their Agricultural Scholarship again in 2021.

This yearly scholarship (approximately $200) is funded with interest from a $5000 gift in November of 1995 from the Paulding County Agronomy Committee, Inc. to the Paulding County 4-H and Youth Endowment Fund.  Please see the link for the application, deadlines and guidelines.

2021 Paulding County Agronomy Scholarship

 

Call for Cooperators – 2021 On-Farm Research

By Rachel Cochran, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Sarah Noggle, Extension Educator

As we begin to approach Spring planting, it’s important to think about the intricacies of the growing season – what fertilizer to use, how much to apply, how to apply it, etc.  If you’re unsure what rate would most benefit your crop while earning you the largest profit, on-farm research may be a good way for you to determine that. If you’re unsure what effects different management practices are having on the health of your soil, on-farm research may be a helpful tool. For almost any question you may have about your operation, an on-farm research trial may be a good way to better understand what the best practices may be for your farm.

This year, we plan to continue the eFields Soil Health Study that was started in 2020. In this study, soil samples are pulled from three depths: 0-4”, 0-6”, and 0-8” within a field. A variety of different tests are then performed on that soil, including routine nutrient analysis, pH, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC), total organic matter, aggregate stability, and Permanganate Oxidizable Carbon (POXC). The results of these tests will be grouped with fields of similar management and published in the 2021 eFields book and will help to give you a snapshot of the health of your soil.

OSU Extension Paulding County is here to help you find out what’s best for your operation, whether it be through sharing of information or planning of research trials on your farm. Reach out to Sarah Noggle, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator, or Rachel Cochran, Water Quality Extension Associate, if you’re interested in doing any type of on-farm research this growing season. We will be happy to set up a trial for you to get the answers you need.

Contact our office at (419) 399-8225, or email noggle.17@osu.edu or cochran.474@osu.edu for more information.

Question of the Week: Pesticide Recordkeeping forms for Dicamba

Question of the Week:  Where can I find the Dicamba recordkeeping forms or the training websites.

Answer:  The general recordkeeping forms are located at https://pested.osu.edu/sites/pested/files/imce/Dicamba_requiredRecords.pdf. Other Dicamba training information is located (including training) https://pested.osu.edu/DicambaRestricitions.

Periodical Cicadas are Poised to Emerge

Authors Joe Boggs
Periodical Cicada
Periodical Cicadas (Magicicada spp.) take either 17 or 13 years to complete their development out-of-site in the soil.  Adults emerge en masse in the spring.  The name of the genus captures the almost magical appearance of these insects:  Magi– comes from the Ancient Greek magos which means “magician.”

Continue reading

2021 Weed Control Guide and NEW Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations Now Available

Are you looking for up-to-date weed control or fertility information before planting season? The OSU Extension Paulding County Office now has copies of the 2021 Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois Weed Control Guide and Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybean, Wheat, and Alfalfa available for purchase.

The 2021 Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois Weed Control Guide explains the importance of weed control and gives suggestions on herbicide management strategies for corn, soybeans, small grains, and forages. Also included are special sections on marestail, Palmer amaranth, and waterhemp. An index to all tables regarding herbicides is listed on the back cover for easy navigation and quick referencing. The cost of the publication is $17.25 plus $1.25 in tax making the total for the booklet $18.50.

The updated Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, and Alfalfa reflects changes in regional field crop production practices,  including general reductions in tillage and crop rotations, greater plant populations and grain yields, new pests and diseases, and the emergence of precision soil sampling and fertilizer rate and placement technologies. The updated fertilizer recommendations aim to aid farmers in managing mineral fertilizer sources in field crop systems as judiciously and profitably as possible. The cost of the publication is $9.00 plus $.65 tax making the total for the booklet $9.65.

Both publications are available for purchase by either cash or check at the OSU Extension Paulding County Office (1425 East High Street, Suite 112, Bryan) Tuesday – Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., no appointment necessary. To pick up an order call office associate, Katie Gorrell or email her at gorrell.42@osu.edu. Please call ANR Extension Educator Sarah Noggle at (419) 399-8225 with any questions specific to the publications.

Livestock and Grain Producers: Dealing with Vomitoxin and Zearalenone

Vomitoxin in the 2020 corn crop continues to plague both livestock and grain producers. Livestock producers are trying to decide how best to manage corn and corn by-products with high levels of vomitoxin, and those who grow corn are trying to decide how best to avoid vomitoxin contamination in 2021.

In the 15 minute video below, OSU Extension Educations John Barker, Rob Leeds, and Jacci Smith discuss where and why this year’s vomitoxin issues originated, considerations for avoiding problems in coming years, how it impacts livestock, and what’s involved in testing grain for vomitoxin.