Plan now to make your summer forage seeding!

Article is taken from https://u.osu.edu/beef/ by Stan Smith, OSU Extension, Fairfield County

With Ohio’s wheat harvest being completed early this year it allows ample time to plan and prepare to do an August forage seeding. Over the next month soil fertility testing should be accomplished, perennial and biennial weeds can be controlled, and ample time remains for selecting and securing the desired forage species for seeding.

Continue reading Plan now to make your summer forage seeding!

Virtual Manure Monday Registration

Manure Monday webinars are back. Manure Mondays Registration Form is included in the link below. Join the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs starting Monday, March 4th, 2024 at 2 pm to continue conversations about a variety of aspects dealing with manure management.

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs invites you to the 2024 Manure Monday Series. Sessions will be delivered through Zoom.  The sessions are free. When you register, you will be registered for all sessions. Registration link click here. Session dates will be March 4, 11, 18, and 25 from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm ET.

  • March 4 – Recycling Sand – Emerging Technologies for Sand-laden Manure
  • March 11th–Manure Application Logistics and Field Strategies –making the most of every minute of application
  • March 18th-Manure Additives –Overview of what’s available and how they work
  • March 25 –Composting Bedded Pack Barns -The Ontario Study.

If you have any questions please contact us at by phone at 1-877-424-1300 or by email at ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca.

You are invited to the 2024 Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Annual Meeting

Dear Past, Present, and potential Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Members,

You are invited to attend the 2024 OFGC Annual Meeting that will be held on Friday, February 9, 2024, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Deerassic Park Education Center in Cambridge, Ohio. We encourage all Ohioans with an interest in forage production to attend. We hope you will consider attending and renewing your OFGC membership. The mission of OFGC is to enhance the profitability of Ohio Farmers through the use of forage and grassland resources.  Your membership will invite you to several forage-related field days throughout the year, automatic membership to the American Forage and Grassland Council, and a free subscription to Progressive Forage Grower magazine. Official Registration and Flyer with Speaker Details Continue reading You are invited to the 2024 Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Annual Meeting

Forage Challenges as the Weather Turns Cooler to Keep Livestock Safe

From OSU Extension’s CORN Newsletter:

By Kyle Verhoff, ANR Educator, Defiance County, and Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Field Specialist, Dairy & Precision Livestock

As the year begins to wrap up and temperatures drop, there are countless things to consider including how the coming frosts impact the toxicity of our forages. This past week many portions of the state began to flirt with possible overnight frosts which raises concerns of prussic acid poisoning, nitrate poisoning, and increased bloat as a result of feeding certain fall forages. Continue reading Forage Challenges as the Weather Turns Cooler to Keep Livestock Safe

Farm Science Review is just around the corner!

LONDON, Ohio – More than 50 companies will join the ranks as exhibitors for the 61st Farm Science Review Sept. 19-21 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center. The new exhibitors represent various sectors in the agriculture industry including livestock handling, equipment advancements, agronomic technology, agricultural policy, and more.

Paulding County Extension Office has tickets for sale at a discounted price total of $10 per ticket. Tickets will be for sale until Monday, September 18 at noon. Continue reading Farm Science Review is just around the corner!

Alfalfa Weevil is in the County

For those of you who have Alfalfa in the county, be on the lookout for Alfalfa weevil. These are pictures shared with me last week.  A few weeks ago in the CORN Newsletter information was shared about scouting for this pest.

Alfalfa fields should be scouted weekly for weevils until at least the first harvest.  Follow-up scouting may be needed after the first harvest in heavily infested fields.

Spot problem fields early by checking alfalfa tips for feeding damage – small holes and a tattered appearance.  Fields that have a south-facing slope tend to warm up sooner and need to be checked for weevil earlier.

Green alfalfa weevil larvae (the main feeding stage) at various growth stages, and brown adults. Photo by Julie Peterson, University of Nebraska.

Here is a video about scouting weevils in alfalfa:  https://forages.osu.edu/video Continue reading Alfalfa Weevil is in the County

Certified Livestock Manager Webinar 4: A Summary of eBarnsOn-Farm Research – CLM Credits Offered

Join the Water Quality Team for our 4th Certified Livestock Manager Webinar of the series on February 6th from 10-11:30 am for “A Summary of eBarns On-Farm Research”.  Speakers include OSU’s own Dr. Brady Campbell, Assistant Professor, and Small Ruminant Specialist, Courtney Krieger, Water Quality Extension Associate, and USDA’s Dr. Jessica Pempek, Research Animal Scientist.  CLM and CCA Credits will be offered at the end of the program. Register at go.osu.edu/CLM to attend this webinar. For questions email emmons.118@osu.edu

eBarns was new in 2022 and focuses on applied livestock, forage, and manure management research across Ohio. The report can be found online at go.osu.edu/ebarns2022. Continue reading Certified Livestock Manager Webinar 4: A Summary of eBarnsOn-Farm Research – CLM Credits Offered

2023 OSU Beef School Opportunities

Join the OSU Extension Beef Team with three upcoming educational opportunities. by Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Specialist.

2023 OSU Beef Team Virtual Beef School

Starting in January and running through April, the 2023 OSU Beef Team Virtual Beef School will be hosted on Zoom on Wednesday evenings once a month at 6:30 PM. Topics will include Beef Inputs and Outlook, Managing Reproduction, Herd Health Management/Update, and Beef Team Live Roundtable. Participants can attend one or all sessions a no cost. To register for the webinars go to http://go.osu.edu/beefschool23. Official Virtual Beef School Flyer

Specific Dates and Topics.

  • January 11 – A Look at Input Costs, Barry Ward, OSU Extension; Cattle Market Outlook, Garth Ruff, OSU Extension
  • February 8 – Presynchronization and Improving Fertility of Beef Cows, Alex Crist, OSU Animal Sciences; Synchronization and Natural Service, Dean Kreager, OSU Extension
  • March 8 — Asian Longhorn Tick and Theileria, Dr. Risa Pesepane, OSU Vet Preventative Medicine; Managing Disease in 2023, Dr. Justin Kieffer DVM, OSU Animal Sciences
  • April 12 — Beef Team Live Roundtable, Ask Questions and Discuss Answers with OSU Extension Beef Team Members

Ohio Beef Cattle Feeding School

On February 6, 2023, there will be a Beef Cattle Feeding School. This year’s Cattle Feeding School will focus on adding value to the cattle feeding enterprise with three featured speakers at two different locations (Hancock and Wayne County). The cost of the event is $20 at each location with a meal provided.

  • Dr. Jerad Jaborek, Michigan State Beef Feedlot Specialist will discuss Marketing and Feeding Considerations for Dairy Beef and Beef x Dairy Cross Cattle.
  • Can we add value to beef manure? Eric Richer, Farm Management Field Specialist will be covering Compost and Fertilizer Potential for Pen Pack Beef Manure.
  • The third speaker of the evening will be GarthRuff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist who will talk Beef Market Outlook for 2023.

The Hancock County event will take place from 12:00 – 2:30 PM at the OSU Extension Office in Hancock County, 7868 County Road 140, Suite B, Findlay, OH 45840. The Wayne County event will take place from 6:00 – 8:30 PM at OARDC Shishler Conference Center, 1680 Madison Ave, Wooster, OH 44691.

Check out the 2023 Ohio Beef Cattle Feeding Flyer to reserve your spot and register for the event.

Ohio Beef Cow/Calf Workshop -Optimizing Herd Fertility

Join the OSU Extension Beef Team on Monday, February 20, 2023, 9:00 am -2:30 pm, at Clemens Farms, 5135 N.Bankes Rd., Malta, OH 43758 for a Cow/Calf Workshop dealing with herd fertility. The cost is $10 per person and the event is limited to the first 50 attendees. Participants must RSVP to OSU Extension Morgan County at 740-962-4854 by February 15, 2023. The event will include a Beef lunch and all materials. Participants are to dress for hands-on demonstrations.

Presentation Topics:

  • Feed Sampling and Nutrient Analysis
  • Mineral Nutrition for Beef Cows
  • Heifer Development Strategies
  • Heifer Synchronization Options
  • Body Condition Scoring and
  • Facilities Tour

Contact information: Chris Penrose, OSU Extension Morgan County. 740-962-4854 or Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Beef Cattle Field Specialist. 740-305-3201.

To see the official flyer: 2023 OH Cow Calf Workshop – Flyer

eBarns- Putting Data in Producers’ Hands

by: Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist
Source: https://u.osu.edu/beef/2022/08/24/ebarns-putting-data-in-producers-hands/
In 1914, the Smith-Lever Act called for the establishment of an Extension program within land grant universities. The Act spells out that Extension is to disseminate “useful and practical information on subjects related to agriculture” and to disseminate reach being conducted at the experiment stations (OARDC here in Ohio). Over the year this “translation” of research has been done in a variety of ways including field days, seminars, one-on-one instruction, and via printed or digital newsletters. Traditionally, faculty who had Extension responsibilities on campus led research efforts, wrote academic journal articles, and then it was up to someone to share and interpret data that was meaningful to clientele in the counties across the state. eBarns, much like Ohio State Extension’s eFields publication does just that, putting the data of applied research into the hands of producers who can then interpret the research to make production decisions. eBarns in new in 2022, focusing on applied livestock, forage, and manure management research across Ohio. The report can be found online at go.osu.edu/ebarns2022. Within the report readers will find forages, dairy, beef, small ruminants, manure nutrients, and swine research projects highlighted and summarized in a user-friendly format. If there are questions regarding a study within the 2022 eBarns report or interest in becoming involved with eBarns efforts in the future contact Garth Ruff at ruff.72@osu.edu.

Regenerative Grazing Pasture Walk to be held in Paulding County!

Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) is hosting a series of Farm Tours across Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan this summer to showcase organic and ecological farms in the region. Among those being showcased is Canal Junction Farm, right here in Paulding County! A Regenerative Grazing Pasture Walk will be held at the farm on Saturday, July 16th, 2022, starting at 10AM. The address is 18637 Rd. 168, Defiance OH. Questions can be directed to Ralph, Sheila, and Kyle Schlatter at (419) 399-7545 or canaljunctionfarm@gmail.com. Their farm’s website is canaljunction.com.

More information about this OEFFA Farm Tour and other stops along the tour can be found at OEFFA’s website, or this link.

Timely Frost Seeding Improves Pasture, Hay Stands!

Chris Penrose, Extension Educator, OSU Extension, Morgan County

If and when the seed can reach the soil in late winter while there is still freezing and thawing activity, clover can fill in bare spots and add to the density of the pasture stand.

In the past, as we’ve talked about the virtues of frost seeding, we’ve suggested it’s something that is best to occur in February or March during the period when the ground is freezing and thawing almost daily. In recent years freezing and thawing temperatures haven’t always happened after mid-February. Since it’s the freezing and thawing over time that gives frost seeding a great chance to work, the time for frost seeding may be upon us soon.

Frost seeding is a very low-cost, higher-risk way to establish new forages in existing fields by spreading seed over the field and letting the freezing and thawing action of the soil allow the seed to make “seed to soil” contact allowing it to successfully germinate. When you see soils “honeycombed” in the morning from a hard frost, or heaved up from a frost, seed that was spread on that soil has a great chance to make seed to soil contact when the soil thaws. I think the two biggest reasons why frost seeding fails is people wait too late to frost seed and the seed never makes good contact with the soil. I have heard some say that they like to “overseed” or just spread seed over an established stand. Let’s face it, if the seed does not land on the soil but on existing living or dead vegetation, it does not have a chance to successfully germinate: you need exposed soil. In light of the recent snow that’s arrived and/or expected throughout Ohio, it’s important to also note that frost seeding can be done over a thin layer of snow, however, it’s important to realize that rapid snowmelt can cause the seed to be washed away from where it’s needed. Continue reading Timely Frost Seeding Improves Pasture, Hay Stands!

Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Conference, February 18

Registration for this annual conference is due February 11

The Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Annual Conference will be held in person on February 18, 2022, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Beck’s Hybrids at 720 US 40 NE, London, Ohio. The program theme is “Foraging for Profit.” All Ohioans involved in forage production and feeding are invited to attend.

The keynote speakers will be Greg Braun, Victor Shelton, and Bob Hendershot. All three are retired NRCS Grassland Conservationists from Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio respectively. The program is being sponsored by the Logan County Land Trust with generous support from the James Forsythe Milroy Foundation.

Additional featured speakers include Dr. Marilia Chiavegato, Assistant Professor at Ohio State University, and two of her students, Ricardo Ribeiro and Marina Miquilini, who will provide a University Forage Research Update. Several producer talks will also be presented including Hay Producer, Glen Courtright from South Charleston, Ohio; Dairy Producer, Jason Hartschuh from Sycamore, Ohio; and Sheep and Goat Producer, Shawn Ray from Cumberland, Ohio. To finish the program Greg Braun, Victor Shelton, and Bob Hendershot will be lead a discussion entitled “Hot Topics in Forages and Grazing.”

Additional details of the program and online payment are available at https://ohiofgc.square.site/. Registration is due by February 11, 2022. For more information, contact OFGC Executive Secretary- Gary Wilson at osuagman@gmail.com or 419-348-3500.

Ag Tech Tuesday

Join the Digital Ag Team as they dive into research results from around the state of Ohio based on the 2021 eFields report. Registration is free but required. Have you been enjoying the 2021 fields Report and are excited to learn more? Join us to learn more about the eFields program and the results we are seeing across the state.

The program will happen on Tuesday, February 1 and 8 from 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM. The format will be the same but due to participants registered different 2021 eFields reports may be discussed. CCA and CEUs will be offered.

Register at http://go.osu.edu/AgTechTues

Don’t get Burned by Hopperburn—Check Alfalfa for Potato Leafhoppers

By:  Andy Michel, Mark Sulc, Curtis Young, CCA, Kelley Tillmon

alfalfa leaf hoppers on dimePotato leafhopper (PLH) adults arrived in Ohio during the last week of June and the first week of July. Since then, the eggs have hatched and we are now seeing late-stage nymphs and adults infesting alfalfa fields.  A few fields are showing the typical “hopper burn”, which is a triangular yellowing from the center of the leaf to the leaf margin. The more mature the crop of alfalfa is since the last cutting, the more the hopper burn symptoms will be showing. Hopper burn will also become more pronounced in areas of the state that are short on rain or are predicted to become drier because the alfalfa will not be able to outgrow the feeding activity of PLH.  Scouting now and making appropriate management decisions based on the scouting can help avoid serious damage to the crop. Continue reading Don’t get Burned by Hopperburn—Check Alfalfa for Potato Leafhoppers

Summer forage Field Days across the state

Join one or all three field days with forage producers across the state. Dates are June 25 (Crawford County), July 9 (Wayne County), August 28 (Licking/Knox Counties). Registration is located at http://go.osu.edu/foragefielddays2021 or by scanning the QR code in the article. The cost for the events will be $10 per location with a $5 discount if you are a member of OFGC (Ohio Forage and Grassland Council).  2021 OFGC Field Day Flyer

Alfalfa Weevil Infestations Becoming Severe in Some Fields

GDD

Figure 1: Accumulated growing degree days (base 48°F sine calculation method) for January 1- May 2, 2021, at several CFAES Ag Weather System (https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/) locations and additional NOAA stations around Ohio (data courtesy of the Midwestern Regional Climate Center (https://mrcc.illinois.edu).

By Mark SulcAaron WilsonKelley TilmonGreg LaBarge, CPAg/CCACurtis Young, CCAAndy MichelBeth Scheckelhoff

Alfalfa fields across Ohio have been observed with alfalfa weevil infestations, some with high numbers and severe feeding damage to the alfalfa.

Accumulation of heat units (growing degree days or GDDs) for alfalfa weevil growth have progressed across Ohio and are now in the 325 to 575 heat unit range indicative of peak larval feeding activity (Figure 1). We are about 2 weeks ahead of GDD weevil accumulation last year.

From the road, severe weevil feeding can look very much like frost injury (Figure 2). Do not be fooled, get out and scout! We have observed very minor frost injury to alfalfa from last week’s cold nights, so if you see “frost injury” in alfalfa, it is more likely to be severe alfalfa weevil feeding damage.  For more information on scouting and signs of damage, see the April 20 article in this newsletter: (https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/10-2021/alfalfa-weevil-%E2%80%93-it%E2%80%99s-closer-you-think). Continue reading Alfalfa Weevil Infestations Becoming Severe in Some Fields

Forage Planting – How to Do It Well

By:  Mark Sulc and Jason Hartschuh, CCA

The window of opportunity for spring forage seedings has been very tight the past three years. Are you ready to roll?

Early spring provides one of the two preferred times to seed perennial cool-season forages, the other being late summer. The outlook for this spring is for probabilities of above-average precipitation in April and May. Planting opportunities will likely be few and short. An accompanying article on preparing now for planting along with the following 10 steps to follow on the day you plant will help improve chances for successful forage establishment.

  1. Check now to make sure soil pH and fertility are in the recommended ranges.  Follow the Tri-state Soil Fertility Recommendations (https://forages.osu.edu/forage-management/soil-fertility-forages).  Forages are more productive where soil pH is above 6.0, but for alfalfa, it should be 6.5 – 6.8. Soil phosphorus should be at least 20 ppm for grasses and 30 ppm for legumes, while minimum soil potassium should be 100 ppm for sandy soils less than 5 CEC or 120 ppm on all other soils. If seedings are to include alfalfa, and soil pH is not at least 6.5, it would be best to apply lime now and delay establishing alfalfa until late summer (plant an annual grass forage in the interim). Continue reading Forage Planting – How to Do It Well

Beef Newsletter

From Stan Smith, OSU Extension

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle Producers-

Six new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1235 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Last week we offered suggestions for seedbed preparation and planting the new forage seeding. This week, Christine Gelley offers detail on forage seed selection. And, it may be March Madness for college basketball enthusiasts, but it’s spring training for Major League Baseball, and the bulls still waiting in the bullpen to get the call!

Articles this week include:

  • Selecting Forages for Your New Seeding
  • Taking the Bull from the Sale Ring or Winter Storage, Making Him the Athlete He Needs to Be
  • Minerals for Beef Cattle
  • Livestock and Grain Producers: Dealing with Vomitoxin and Zearalenone
  • Weighing the Options
  • March 1, 2021 Cattle on Feed Inventory up 1.6% from 2020

Continue reading Beef Newsletter

Precautions for Feeding Frosted and Drought-Stressed Forages

Hay bales in the field

Livestock owners feeding forage need to keep in mind the potential for some forage toxicities and other problems that can develop this fall. High nitrates and prussic acid poisoning are the main potential concerns. These are primarily an issue with annual forages and several weed species, but nitrates can be an issue even in drought-stressed perennial forages. There is also an increased risk of bloat when grazing legumes after a frost.

Nitrate Toxicity

Drought-stressed forages can accumulate toxic nitrate levels. This can occur in many different forage species, including both annuals and perennials. Several areas in Ohio have been dry of late. Corn, oat, and other small grains, sudangrass, and sorghum-sudangrass, and many weed species including johnsongrass can accumulate toxic levels of nitrates. Even alfalfa can accumulate toxic nitrate levels under severe drought stress.

Before feeding or grazing drought-stressed forage, send in a forage sample to be tested for nitrates. Most labs now offer nitrate tests, so it is likely that you can get a forage nitrate test by your favorite lab. Several labs are listed at the end of this article that does nitrate testing. This list is for your convenience and no labs are intentionally omitted. Check your chosen lab’s website or call them and follow their specific instructions about how to collect and handle the sample. The cost is well worth it against the risk of losing animals.

See the following references for more details:

Nitrates in Cattle Sheep and Goats (University of Wisconsin Extension) https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/forage/nitrate-poisoning-in-cattle-sheep-and-goats/

Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages (Texas Cooperative Extension) http://forages.tamu.edu/PDF/Nitrate.pdf

Nitrate accumulation in frosted forages. Freezing damage slows down metabolism in all plants, and this might result in nitrate accumulation in plants that are still growing, especially grasses like oats and other small grains, millet, and sudangrass.  This build-up usually is not hazardous to grazing animals, but green chop or hay cut right after a freeze can be more dangerous. When in doubt, test the forage for nitrates before grazing or feeding it. Continue reading Precautions for Feeding Frosted and Drought-Stressed Forages

Scout now for cressleaf groundsel in hayfields, or pay the price in May

Cressleaf GroundselBy Mark Sulc, OSU

Some hay producers have been unpleasantly surprised in the past when cressleaf groundsel infestations became evident in their hay fields in May prior to first cutting.  Cressleaf groundsel in hay or silage is toxic to animals, and infested areas of the field should not be harvested and fed.  Groundsel is a winter annual, emerging in late summer into fall when it develops into a rosette that overwinters.  Growth restarts in spring, with stem elongation and an eventual height of up to several feet tall.  The weed becomes evident in hayfields when it becomes taller than the alfalfa/grass and develops bright yellow flowers in May.  The problem with passively waiting until this point to discover that the hay is infested with groundsel is that: 1) it’s too late to control it with herbicides; and 2) hay from infested areas has to be discarded instead of sold or fed, and large plant skeletons are still toxic even if herbicides were effective on them.  Groundsel plants finish their life cycle in late spring, once they flower and go to seed, so it should not be a problem in subsequent cuttings. Continue reading Scout now for cressleaf groundsel in hayfields, or pay the price in May