Scout now for cressleaf groundsel in hayfields, or pay the price in May

Cressleaf GroundselBy Mark Sulc, OSU

Some hay producers have been unpleasantly surprised in the past when cressleaf groundsel infestations became evident in their hay fields in May prior to first cutting.  Cressleaf groundsel in hay or silage is toxic to animals, and infested areas of the field should not be harvested and fed.  Groundsel is a winter annual, emerging in late summer into fall when it develops into a rosette that overwinters.  Growth restarts in spring, with stem elongation and an eventual height of up to several feet tall.  The weed becomes evident in hayfields when it becomes taller than the alfalfa/grass and develops bright yellow flowers in May.  The problem with passively waiting until this point to discover that the hay is infested with groundsel is that: 1) it’s too late to control it with herbicides; and 2) hay from infested areas has to be discarded instead of sold or fed, and large plant skeletons are still toxic even if herbicides were effective on them.  Groundsel plants finish their life cycle in late spring, once they flower and go to seed, so it should not be a problem in subsequent cuttings. Continue reading

Burndown Herbicides for No-till Wheat

High-Yield Wheat: No-Till Can Boost Yields - AgWebBy Mark Loux, OSU

Herbicide options for burndown of existing weeds prior to planting of no-till wheat include glyphosate, Gramoxone, Sharpen, and dicamba.  Among these, the combination of glyphosate and Sharpen probably provides the best combination of efficacy on marestail, flexibility in application timing, and residual control.  Dicamba labels have the following restriction on preplant applications – “allow 10 days between application and planting for each 0.25 lb ai/A used”.  A rate of 0.5 lb ai/A would therefore need to be applied at least 20 days before planting.  We do not know of any 2,4-D product labels that support the use of 2,4-D prior to or at the time wheat planting.  There is some risk of stand reduction and injury to wheat from applications of 2,4-D too close to the time of planting.  Liberty and other glufosinate products are also not labeled for use as a burndown treatment for wheat.  Sharpen should provide limited residual control of winter annuals that emerge after herbicide application, and the rate can be increased from 1 to 2 oz/A to improve the length of residual.  Gramoxone should also effectively control small seedlings of marestail and other winter annuals.  Be sure to use the appropriate adjuvants with any of these, and increase spray volume to 15 to 20 GPA to ensure adequate coverage with Sharpen or Gramoxone.

There are several effective postemergence herbicide treatments for wheat that can be applied in November to control these weeds, in fields where preplant burndown treatments are not used.  The most effective postemergence treatments include Huskie, Quelex, or mixtures of dicamba with either Peak, tribenuron (Express, etc), or a tribenuron/thifensulfuron premix (Harmony Xtra, etc).  We discourage the application of 2,4-D to emerged wheat in the fall due to the risk of injury and yield reduction.

Private Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification Opportunities Online

The Effect of Variable Rate Fertilizer ApplicationPrivate Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification Opportunities Online
Do you still need pesticide recertification for 2020?  There are two options for private applicators that still need to get their recertification credits for this past 2020 season. Here are your options:

1. ONLINE: OSU Extension is offering a TEMPORARY online solution to those who were unable to recertify as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Online private pesticide recertification is a one size fits all, three-hour program. The course is self-paced so applicators can complete it at their convenience, as long as they meet the deadline (90 days after the emergency Executive Order ends or December 1, 2020). The cost is $35 and includes these segments:

  • Core: 1 hour
  • Category 1, Grain & Cereal Crops:  30 min
  • Category 2, Forage & Livestock:  30 min
  • Category 3, Fruit & Vegetable Crops:  15 min
  • Category 4,  Nursery & Forest Crops:  15 min
  • Category 5,  Greenhouse Crops:  15 min
  • Category 6, Fumigation:  15 min
  • What you will need to recertify:
    • Your pesticide license number.   If you do not know your number, call the extension office or ODA directly for assistance.
    • An email address. Applicators will need to create a username and password to access the modules.
    • Access to the internet. Register at: https://pested.osu.edu/onlinerecert
  • Recertification for fertilizer certificate holders (private and commercial) will be available as a separate course for $10.

2. IN OFFICE: Contact our office to come in and view video courses. Please reserve three hours for the Private Pesticide license and one hour for fertilizer recertification. Pesticide only is $35; fertilizer is $10.

Please note: Recertification under this option is only available for those people expiring in 2020.  I will have more details on the 2021 recertification in a future blog post.

Pre-harvest Herbicide Treatments

Velvetleaf in a Soybean Field

Information on preharvest herbicide treatments for field corn and soybeans can be found in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois”, at the end of these crop sections (pages 72 and 143 of the 2020 edition).  Products listed for corn include Aim, glyphosate, and paraquat, and for soybeans include Aim, paraquat, glyphosate, and Sharpen.  Some dicamba products are also approved for preharvest use in soybeans, and some 2,4-D products are approved for use in corn, and these are not listed in the guide.  The basic information for these follows:

Dicamba – soybeans:  Apply 8 – 32 oz/A (4 lb/gal products) as a broadcast or spot treatment after soybean pods have reached mature brown color and at least 75% leaf drop has occurred; soybeans may be harvested 14 days or more after a pre-harvest application; do not use preharvest-treated soybean for seed unless a germination test is performed on the seed with an acceptable result of 95% germination or better; do not feed soybean fodder or hay following a preharvest application of this product. Continue reading

Ohio Commercial Pesticide Online Recertification

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, OSUE Pesticide Safety Education Program partnered with the Ohio Department of Agriculture to temporarily provide online credits for Ohio commercial pesticide applicators who need recertification hours for the 2020 deadline.  This course will be available until the deadline for 90 days after the State of Emergency ends, or December 1 – whichever comes first. All categories are available. 

Online Registration Only: Fee: $15 per credit hour, Register here!

Questions: Pesticide Safety Education Program:  pested@osu.edu, 614-292-4070.

Need help navigating the course? View our online tutorials here.

Leafhoppers, Grasshoppers, and Beetles, Oh My!

Adult red-headed flea beetle (P. Beauzay, NDSU)

By Kelley Tilmon, Andy Michel

As the summer progresses we are receiving reports of insect problems often encouraged by hot, dry weather.  Last week we reported on spider mites and especially if you are in an area of continued dry weather we recommend scouting your soybeans and corn  https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-22/watch-spider-mites-dry-areas .

Some areas are also reporting increases in young grasshoppers in soybeans, another insect favored by dry weather.  Grasshoppers of often start on field edges so early scouting may allow for edge treatment.  Japanese beetles are another common defoliator of soybean that are starting to appear.  Both of these pests fall into a general defoliation measurement, and we recommend treatment if defoliation is approaching 20% on the majority of plants in post-flowering beans.  Download our guide to estimating defoliation in soybean at https://aginsects.osu.edu/sites/aginsects/files/imce/Leaf%20Defoliators%20PDF_0.pdf Continue reading

Lookout for Spider Mites

Soybean leaves showing speckling.

With continued dry weather, spider mites are one of the main pests to remain vigilant about in field crops.  They will often show up in field borders first as they move in from other habitats, for example, if nearby ditches have been mowed.  Spider mites are difficult to see.  Look for injury signs — yellow spotting or stippling on the upper side of leaves.  In soybeans, this damage usually begins in the lower canopy and progresses upward as the mite population increases.  Heavily infested leaves may also have light webbing similar to spider webs. Continue reading

ODA’s Clean Sweep Program Set for August 19 in Findlay

ODA has selected three sites across Ohio for their annual Clean Sweep collection of agricultural pesticides in August. These locations are:

August 18: Fayette County 9 am – 3 pm

Fayette County Airport
2770 Old Rt 38 NE.
Washington Courthouse, Ohio 43160

August 19: Hancock County 9 am – 3 pm

Hancock County Fairgrounds
1017 E. Sandusky Street
Findlay, Ohio 45840

August 25: Lake County 9 am – 3 pm

Perry Coal and Feed
4204 Main Street
Perry, Ohio 44081

Unused, unwanted, and unlabeled pesticides pose many health and safety risks to you and those on your farm. Luckily, farmers in Paulding County don’t have to travel too far to dispose of these pesticides and pesticide containers this year. Between now and August 19, I encourage everyone to collect pesticides and pesticide containers that may be in your sheds, shops, chemical cabinets, etc. that you no longer use or plan to use. The disposal is free and there is no cost to you. Continue reading

Ohio Department of Agriculture Partners With OSU Extension to Provide Online Pesticide Re-certification Opportunities

Press Release from Ohio Department of Agriculture

The temporary online training during the COVID-19 Pandemic allows applicators and fertilizer certificate holders to meet their continuing education requirements.

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (June 29, 2020) – During the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), is partnering with the Ohio State University Extension Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) to temporarily provide online recertification for pesticide applicators and fertilizer certificate holders whose licenses expired in spring of 2020. The online recertification will be available Monday, July 6. For commercial applicators, it will be available on August 10. For more information or to register for the online recertification, visit pested.osu.edu/onlinerecert. Continue reading

Dicamba battles continue: court allows dicamba use

There was a great deal of action last Friday in the case that vacated the registrations of XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan dicamba-based products.  Despite a barrage of court filings on Friday, however, nothing has changed the current legal status of the dicamba products in Ohio, and Ohio growers may use existing stocks of the products now. Still, they must end-use by June 30th, 2020.

Here’s a rundown of the orders that the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued in the case last Friday:

The court denied the emergency motion that the petitioners (National Family Farm Coalition, Center for Food Safety, Center for Biological Diversity, and Pesticide Action Network North America) filed on June 13th.  That motion asked the court to enforce its previous mandate to vacate the registrations, to prevent any further use of the products, and to hold the EPA in contempt for issuing the Cancellation Order the agency had made that allowed continued use of existing stocks of the products.  The court did not provide its reasoning for denying the motion. Continue reading

True Armyworm Infestations

By:  Andy Michel, Curtis Young, CCA, Kelley Tilmon

We received many reports of true armyworm infestations in wheat, barley, and corn. These are black or green caterpillars with stripes along the side and orange heads.  In the spring, true armyworm moths migrate from the south and lay eggs in grasses such as forage and weed grasses, winter wheat and barley, and rye cover crops.  When the eggs hatch, the larvae can significantly damage wheat and barley before then moving to young corn. Usually, moth flights occur in April, but we may have had a second peak the first or second week of May—it’s likely the caterpillars feeding now are from this later flight. Right now, wheat, barley, and corn should be inspected for true armyworm populations. Armyworms like to hide during the day and feed at night, so scouting should occur at dusk or dawn, and/or on cloudy days. Continue reading

Ohio Department of Agriculture: dicamba use in Ohio ends June 30, 2020

By:  Peggy Hall

The dicamba roller coaster ride continues today, with a statement issued by the Ohio Department of Agriculture clarifying that the use of XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan dicamba-based products in Ohio will end as of June 30, 2020.  Even though the US EPA has issued an order allowing continued use of the products until July 31, 2020, use in Ohio must end on June 30 because the Ohio registrations for the three dicamba-based products expire on that day. Continue reading

Dicamba takes another blow: Court of Appeals vacates dicamba registration

by: Peggy Kirk Hall, Associate Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law

Published on Thursday, June 04, 2020

Dicamba has had its share of legal challenges, and a decision issued yesterday dealt yet another blow when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the product’s registration with the U.S. EPA.  In doing so, the court held that the EPA’s approval of the registration violated the provisions of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (“FIFRA”), which regulates the use of herbicides and other chemicals in the U.S.  Here’s a summary of how the court reached its decision and a few thoughts on the uncertainty that follows the opinion. Continue reading

Pesticide and Fertilizer Private Applicator Update

With the signing of House Bill 197, Ohio’s COVID-19 emergency response legislation, the March 31, 2020 deadline for private pesticide applicators (farmers) and the May 31, 2020 deadline for agricultural fertilizer certificate holders to renew their license and get training has been extended.

The deadline is now 90 days after the state of emergency Executive Order ends or December 1, 2020, whichever comes first.

All in-person OSUE events are canceled or postponed through at least May 15. Applicators that still are in need of training are encouraged to visit pested.osu.edu for more information when classes resume.

If you have not received your updated applicator card please be aware that ODA is working diligently with a reduced on-site staff to get cards out. Your pink (or yellow) copy of the re-certification sheet (the triplicate from the re-certification class or conference that you attended) is your temporary certification until you get your card.

Omitting residual herbicides in soybeans – really – we have to have this argument again?

By Dr. Mark Loux OSU Weed Science

According to our network of sources, the effectiveness of new soybean trait systems has some growers once again thinking about omitting preemergence residual herbicides from their weed management programs.  Some people apparently need to learn the same lessons over and over again.  Having gone through this once in the early 2000s when Roundup Ready soybeans had taken over and we all sprayed only glyphosate all day every day, we think we’re pretty sure where it leads.  We’re sensitive to concerns about the cost of production, but the cost-benefit analysis for residual herbicides is way in the positive column.  We’re not the ones who ultimately have to convince growers to keep using residual herbicides, and we respect those of you who do have to fight this battle.  Back in the first round of this when we were advocating for use of residuals, while the developers of RR soybeans were undermining us and telling everyone that residuals would reduce yield etc, we used to have people tell us “My agronomist/salesman is recommending that I use residuals, but I think he/she is just trying to get more money out of me”.  Our response at that time, of course, was “no pretty sure he/she is just trying to save your **** and make sure you control your weeds so that your whole farm isn’t one big infestation of glyphosate-resistant marestail.”  And that answer probably works today too – maybe substituting waterhemp for marestail. Continue reading

Cover Crop Termination

Cereal RyeBy: Alyssa Essman and Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension, Weed Science Specialist

The 2019 growing season came and went and left many fields in a state of disarray heading into 2020. Many growers that were unable to plant decided to use cover crops, to reduce soil erosion and provide some weed suppression during the extended fallow period. Terminating these cover crops using the right methods at the right time will be critical to ensure timely planting and prevent the cover crops from competing with cash crops. The three main methods of cover crop termination are natural (species that winter kill), chemical, and mechanical. Cover crops may also be bailed, grazed, or harvested as silage. Most species require some sort of management decision for termination. Cover crop species, growth stage, weather, and cover cropping goals should all be considered when planning termination method and timing. These decisions require a balance between growing the cover long enough to maximize benefits and terminating in time to prevent potential penalties to the following cash crop. Continue reading

Annual Dicamba Training

I have received this information from Jennifer Andon at OSU Pesticide Education about the 2020 Diacamba training.

It is that time of year again for annual dicamba training.  Online training is available through all of the registrants. Any dicamba-specific training will meet the training requirements to apply Xtendimax, Engenia,  FeXapan or Tavium regardless of which company (BASF, Monsanto, Dupont or Syngenta) sponsored the meeting.  Ohio Will also accept training from IN, MI, KY, PA & WV.

Additionally, Monsanto is offering several in-person trainings around the state:

February 12, 2020:  Tiffin
February 26, 2020:  Springboro
March 10, 2020:  Wilmington
March 12, 2020:  Lima

Paulding County Pesticide and Fertilizer Re-certification is January 28

  The OSU Extension Office in Paulding County will be hosting the Fertilizer and Pesticide Recertification on Tuesday, January 28, 2020.  Cost of the classes are as follows:

  1. Fertilizer Re-certification $10.
  2. Pesticide Re-certification $30.
  3. Registrations received after January 23rd will receive a $10 late fee.

Please register for the classes by going to the following link at http://www.cvent.com/d/thqr4m . Continue reading

Pesticide License “Crash Course”

With the new changes for the Dicamba restrictions, I have had many phone calls to sign up for the Pesticide Testing through Ohio Department of Agriculture.   Additionally, our office is selling the Private Pesticide Applicator study materials.

If you are one of those people who would rather have a hands-on class to help with the testing process, please join us on February 7, 2019 from 9:30 – 11:30 for a Pesticide crash course.  Cost of the class is $25 and registration is requested prior to the event for planning purposes.  These classes will cover CORE and Category 1.  The final 30 minutes will be spent preparing and registering for the exam.    Study materials are a separate fee and I recommend that you call the office to order before walking in.  These study materials are flying off the shelves like hot cakes.