Reports from National Ag Statistics for July published late June.

Reports from the National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) for July 2020.

July 2020 Milk Production Report Ohio

July 2020 Milk Production Report published on August 20, 2020

Dairy herds in Ohio produced 475 million pounds of milk during July, up 4.4 percent from a year ago, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician of the USDA, NASS, Ohio Field Office. Production per cow in Ohio averaged 1,870 pounds for July, 50 pounds above July 2019. The dairy herd was estimated at 254,000 head for July, up 4,000 head from a year earlier.
Milk production in the 24 major States during July totaled 17.8 billion pounds, up 1.5 percent from July 2019. June revised production, at 17.5 billion pounds, was up 0.8 percent from June 2019. The June revision represented an increase of 59 million pounds or 0.3 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 24 major States averaged 2,016 pounds for July, 19 pounds above July 2019. The number of milk cows on farms in the 24 major States was 8.83 million head, 44,000 head more than July 2019, and 2,000 head more than June 2020.

July 2020 Ohio Agricultural Prices

Ohio July Agricultural Prices published on August 31, 2020

Prices Received by Ohio farmers for the full month of July 2020 are listed in the table in the link provided above.
Some Ohio highlights were: July corn, at $3.47 per bushel, decreased $0.07 from June and decreased $1.12 from last year; July soybeans, at $8.95 per bushel, increased $0.13 from last month and increased $0.30 from last year; July wheat, at $5.17 per bushel, increased $0.10 from June but decreased $0.04 from last year; July milk, at $18.70 per cwt., increased $1.80 from last month and increased $0.30 from last year.

The July Prices Received Index 2011 Base (Agricultural Production), at 87.4, decreased 2.0 percent from June and 4.3 percent from July 2019. At 90.0, the Crop Production Index was down 2.0 percent from last month but up 0.9 percent from the previous year. The Livestock Production Index, at 84.5, decreased 2.5 percent from June, and 9.8 percent from July last year. Producers received higher prices during July for milk, market eggs, potatoes, and corn but lower prices for cattle, broilers, hogs, and oranges. In addition to prices, the indexes are influenced by the volume change of the commodities producers market. In July, there was increased monthly movement for grapes, wheat, hay, and tomatoes and decreased marketing of milk, oranges, cattle, and strawberries.

Battle for Lake Erie includes debate over manure-based phosphorus concentration

8/31/2020
BY TOM HENRY / THE BLADE

A major agronomic debate is being played out in Columbus now, which has potentially large ramifications for western Lake Erie and goes beyond simply looking at the staggering volumes of liquid and solid excrement produced by northwest Ohio cows, hogs, and chickens.

It focuses on the minutia of agricultural science, right down to the parts per million of phosphorus applied to soil in the form of manure.

One of the many groups raising questions is the Lake Erie Foundation, a consortium of Lake Erie-area business and environmental interests. That group and others, including Lake Erie Waterkeeper, want manure-based phosphorus applications dialed down to roughly the same concentration as commercially made, synthetic fertilizers, which is about 40 to 50 parts per million. Manure has for years been applied on northwest Ohio crop farms at much higher concentrations, usually 150 ppm. Some critics, though, claim the application rate has, in reality, gotten as high as 200 ppm to 250 ppm.

From information gathered in a public records request, the foundation believes the state of Ohio has rejected a recommendation from an independent consultant, McKinsey & Co., to promote 50 ppm as a limit for manure, even though Dorothy Pelanda, Ohio Department of Agriculture director, showed support for that in 2019. The firm was paid $1.5 million to provide advice to the DeWine administration for its H2Ohio program, which aims to improve water quality statewide through better farming techniques, more and improved wetlands, better pipelines, and other measures. Continue reading

Economic Assistance Available for Dairy Farms

by: Dianne Shoemaker, OSU Extension, shoemaker.3@osu.edu

Click here for a PDF version of the article

One hundred and fifty days.  In only 150 days we have gone from anticipating a solid year of recovery for the dairy industry to seeing an April Class III price of $13.07 per cwt, the lowest Class III milk price in 10 years, with May announced at $12.14 on June 8th.  In that same time period, major market disruptions occurred for nearly every commodity with impacts all along the food chain.  The response to the anticipated economic impact at the farm level has been swift, with a variety of options available to assist dairy farms.   We will touch on a few of them here, including links for additional information.  Every farm should review these options and see if there are opportunities to assist with cash flow shortfalls. Continue reading