Regenerative Grazing Pasture Walk to be held in Paulding County!

Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) is hosting a series of Farm Tours across Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan this summer to showcase organic and ecological farms in the region. Among those being showcased is Canal Junction Farm, right here in Paulding County! A Regenerative Grazing Pasture Walk will be held at the farm on Saturday, July 16th, 2022, starting at 10AM. The address is 18637 Rd. 168, Defiance OH. Questions can be directed to Ralph, Sheila, and Kyle Schlatter at (419) 399-7545 or canaljunctionfarm@gmail.com. Their farm’s website is canaljunction.com.

More information about this OEFFA Farm Tour and other stops along the tour can be found at OEFFA’s website, or this link.

Ohio Dairy Producer Lunch and Learn Series

The OSU Extension Dairy Team will be offering a series of webinars this winter to provide producers with timely updates on risk management strategies, milk market outlook, farm safety, and maximizing manure value. The webinars will take place at 1 pm on the following Fridays:

  • March 4: Keeping Yourself and Employees Safe on the Farm: Dairy farms can be a dangerous place, thus keeping our families and employees safe is critical. Taylor Dill and Jamie Hampton will be talking about assessing safety risks on your farm and developing a plan to help keep everyone on your farm safe.
  • March 18: Utilizing Your Farm’s Manure to Maximize Farm Profit: Manure can be an income or an expense, depending on how it is managed. Maximizing manure nutrient retention can help make it an income, especially with current fertilizer prices. Learn more about the current fertilizer situation and ways to better utilize manure from Glen Arnold, Chris Zoller, Eric Richer, Haley Zynda, and Chris Shoup.

To register for the webinar series, visit https://go.osu.edu/2022osudairyprogram. If you have questions about these educational programs, please contact Jason Hartschuh at Hartschuh.11@osu.edu.

Additionally, you can find the recorded session by contacting the dairy team.

  • February 11: Dairy Risk Management: The first two risk management tools many producers utilize are the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) and the Dairy Revenue Protection programs. Dianne Shoemaker will be covering changes that have been made to the DMC program, including the supplemental coverage which allows for an increase in milk production coverage. Jason Hartschuh will be covering the Dairy Revenue Protection program which can be used to set a floor under your milk price.
  • February 18: Milk Production, Demand, and Price Outlook for 2022: Dr. Chris Wolf, the dairy economist at Cornell University, will be providing us updates on current dairy markets. Milk prices have been continuing to climb – what are the driving factors and how long will milk prices stay up? Even with higher milk prices, margins may stay tight.

Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Conference, February 18

Registration for this annual conference is due February 11

The Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Annual Conference will be held in person on February 18, 2022, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Beck’s Hybrids at 720 US 40 NE, London, Ohio. The program theme is “Foraging for Profit.” All Ohioans involved in forage production and feeding are invited to attend.

The keynote speakers will be Greg Braun, Victor Shelton, and Bob Hendershot. All three are retired NRCS Grassland Conservationists from Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio respectively. The program is being sponsored by the Logan County Land Trust with generous support from the James Forsythe Milroy Foundation.

Additional featured speakers include Dr. Marilia Chiavegato, Assistant Professor at Ohio State University, and two of her students, Ricardo Ribeiro and Marina Miquilini, who will provide a University Forage Research Update. Several producer talks will also be presented including Hay Producer, Glen Courtright from South Charleston, Ohio; Dairy Producer, Jason Hartschuh from Sycamore, Ohio; and Sheep and Goat Producer, Shawn Ray from Cumberland, Ohio. To finish the program Greg Braun, Victor Shelton, and Bob Hendershot will be lead a discussion entitled “Hot Topics in Forages and Grazing.”

Additional details of the program and online payment are available at https://ohiofgc.square.site/. Registration is due by February 11, 2022. For more information, contact OFGC Executive Secretary- Gary Wilson at osuagman@gmail.com or 419-348-3500.

New 5-Minute Ag Topic Video: Manure

Click below to view the second video in our new 5-Minute Ag Topic video series, which we hope to continue over the course of 2022. The topic for this second video is manure. Water Quality Extension Associate Rachel Cochran discusses different types of manure, rules and regulations surrounding its use, benefits to applying manure, as well as safety considerations. If you have any suggestions for future video topics, or would like to get information regarding manure research opportunities on your farm, please reach out to cochran.474@osu.edu or noggle.17@osu.edu.

Management Considerations for Beef x Dairy Calves

Regardless of the genetics of cattle, you’re feeding, you will find value in listening to this three-part webinar series.

This article originally appeared in the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter at https://u.osu.edu/beef/2021/05/12/management-considerations-for-beef-x-dairy-calves/

During the first session (embedded below) held on April 21 the focus was on marketing dairy beef calves and featured Larry Rose and JT Loewe of JBS as they discussed the quality of the cattle they seek to purchase, their pricing structure, and the demands they have for high quality, consistently sized and correctly finished dairy crossed beef cattle. Regardless of the genetics being fed, the speakers shared a strong message for the value of consistency and proper finish the market is demanding in all fed cattle. Garth Ruff, Ohio State University Extension Beef Field Specialist, and Jerad Jaborek, Feedlot Systems Extension Educator at Michigan State University, hosted a three-part webinar series on management considerations for beef sired calves from dairy cows that covered a variety of topics related to marketing, genetics, and management of crossbred beef x dairy cattle.

Continue reading

Livestock and Grain Producers: Dealing with Vomitoxin and Zearalenone

Vomitoxin in the 2020 corn crop continues to plague both livestock and grain producers. Livestock producers are trying to decide how best to manage corn and corn by-products with high levels of vomitoxin, and those who grow corn are trying to decide how best to avoid vomitoxin contamination in 2021.

In the 15 minute video below, OSU Extension Educations John Barker, Rob Leeds, and Jacci Smith discuss where and why this year’s vomitoxin issues originated, considerations for avoiding problems in coming years, how it impacts livestock, and what’s involved in testing grain for vomitoxin.

Reports from National Ag Statistics for July published late June.

Reports from the National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) for July 2020.

July 2020 Milk Production Report Ohio

July 2020 Milk Production Report published on August 20, 2020

Dairy herds in Ohio produced 475 million pounds of milk during July, up 4.4 percent from a year ago, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician of the USDA, NASS, Ohio Field Office. Production per cow in Ohio averaged 1,870 pounds for July, 50 pounds above July 2019. The dairy herd was estimated at 254,000 head for July, up 4,000 head from a year earlier.
Milk production in the 24 major States during July totaled 17.8 billion pounds, up 1.5 percent from July 2019. June revised production, at 17.5 billion pounds, was up 0.8 percent from June 2019. The June revision represented an increase of 59 million pounds or 0.3 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 24 major States averaged 2,016 pounds for July, 19 pounds above July 2019. The number of milk cows on farms in the 24 major States was 8.83 million head, 44,000 head more than July 2019, and 2,000 head more than June 2020.

July 2020 Ohio Agricultural Prices

Ohio July Agricultural Prices published on August 31, 2020

Prices Received by Ohio farmers for the full month of July 2020 are listed in the table in the link provided above.
Some Ohio highlights were: July corn, at $3.47 per bushel, decreased $0.07 from June and decreased $1.12 from last year; July soybeans, at $8.95 per bushel, increased $0.13 from last month and increased $0.30 from last year; July wheat, at $5.17 per bushel, increased $0.10 from June but decreased $0.04 from last year; July milk, at $18.70 per cwt., increased $1.80 from last month and increased $0.30 from last year.

The July Prices Received Index 2011 Base (Agricultural Production), at 87.4, decreased 2.0 percent from June and 4.3 percent from July 2019. At 90.0, the Crop Production Index was down 2.0 percent from last month but up 0.9 percent from the previous year. The Livestock Production Index, at 84.5, decreased 2.5 percent from June, and 9.8 percent from July last year. Producers received higher prices during July for milk, market eggs, potatoes, and corn but lower prices for cattle, broilers, hogs, and oranges. In addition to prices, the indexes are influenced by the volume change of the commodities producers market. In July, there was increased monthly movement for grapes, wheat, hay, and tomatoes and decreased marketing of milk, oranges, cattle, and strawberries.

Battle for Lake Erie includes debate over manure-based phosphorus concentration

8/31/2020
BY TOM HENRY / THE BLADE

A major agronomic debate is being played out in Columbus now, which has potentially large ramifications for western Lake Erie and goes beyond simply looking at the staggering volumes of liquid and solid excrement produced by northwest Ohio cows, hogs, and chickens.

It focuses on the minutia of agricultural science, right down to the parts per million of phosphorus applied to soil in the form of manure.

One of the many groups raising questions is the Lake Erie Foundation, a consortium of Lake Erie-area business and environmental interests. That group and others, including Lake Erie Waterkeeper, want manure-based phosphorus applications dialed down to roughly the same concentration as commercially made, synthetic fertilizers, which is about 40 to 50 parts per million. Manure has for years been applied on northwest Ohio crop farms at much higher concentrations, usually 150 ppm. Some critics, though, claim the application rate has, in reality, gotten as high as 200 ppm to 250 ppm.

From information gathered in a public records request, the foundation believes the state of Ohio has rejected a recommendation from an independent consultant, McKinsey & Co., to promote 50 ppm as a limit for manure, even though Dorothy Pelanda, Ohio Department of Agriculture director, showed support for that in 2019. The firm was paid $1.5 million to provide advice to the DeWine administration for its H2Ohio program, which aims to improve water quality statewide through better farming techniques, more and improved wetlands, better pipelines, and other measures. Continue reading

Economic Assistance Available for Dairy Farms

by: Dianne Shoemaker, OSU Extension, shoemaker.3@osu.edu

Click here for a PDF version of the article

One hundred and fifty days.  In only 150 days we have gone from anticipating a solid year of recovery for the dairy industry to seeing an April Class III price of $13.07 per cwt, the lowest Class III milk price in 10 years, with May announced at $12.14 on June 8th.  In that same time period, major market disruptions occurred for nearly every commodity with impacts all along the food chain.  The response to the anticipated economic impact at the farm level has been swift, with a variety of options available to assist dairy farms.   We will touch on a few of them here, including links for additional information.  Every farm should review these options and see if there are opportunities to assist with cash flow shortfalls. Continue reading