Decent Harvest Weather Likely to Continue into October

By Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension

Weather Summary

Ohio’s weather has been dominated by the high pressure of late, bringing with it a pattern of warm, sunny days and cool nights for the last couple of weeks. During this time, little to no rain has fallen across the state. As daylight hours are growing shorter, evaporation is not as strong as it is during the summer. Therefore, drought conditions are not rapidly expanding across Ohio. However, persistent dryness is evident across areas of northwest, southwest, and far northeast Ohio, where soils remain dry. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor indicates about 18% of Ohio is still experiencing abnormally dry to moderate drought conditions (Fig. 1). For more information on recent climate conditions and impacts, check out the latest Hydro-Climate Assessment from the State Climate Office of Ohio.

Figure 1: U.S. Drought Monitor for Ohio as reported on Thursday, September 22, 2020.

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Labor Day Rainfall Eases Drought

Figure 1: U.S. Drought Monitor for Ohio as reported on Thursday, September 10, 2020

Weather Summary

Summer (June – August) 2020 ranks as the 11th warmest and 29th driest summer on record for the state of Ohio since 1895. Temperatures averaged 1-4°F above average (1981-2010), with 5-10 inches of rainfall across the northwestern half of the state and 10-15 inches across the southeastern half. Particularly dry this summer has been the northwestern counties, a few counties in central and southwest Ohio (e.g., Madison, Pickaway, Ross, Fayette, and Greene), as well as Richland, Ashland, Wayne, and Stark Counties.

Though too late for most crops in the state, recent rainfall is helping to recharge soil moisture. A slow-moving boundary draped across the state on Labor Day brought significant rainfall to much of northern Ohio. Most locations along and north of about I-70 (except NW Ohio) received 2-7” of rain. There was also a confirmed EF0 tornado a few miles east of Delaware with estimated winds to 80 mph and a few reports of large hail across the state. As of Thursday, September 10, 2020, the U.S. Drought Monitor indicates about 19% of Ohio is experiencing abnormally dry to moderate drought conditions, down from about 37% the prior week (Figure 1). For more information on recent climate conditions and impacts, check out the latest Hydro-Climate Assessment from the State Climate Office of Ohio. Continue reading

We Now Turn Our Attention to Autumn Harvest Season

Map of Pacific Ocean

Map of Pacific Ocean

Article from CORN 9-1-2020, Jim Noel, National Weather Service

The cooler than normal blob of water in the eastern Pacific Ocean near the equator tends to push the first autumn freeze later than normal in our region. Therefore, there is no indication of an early freeze in September this year. It appears the first freeze for Ohio will not come until October either on schedule or a bit later than normal.

September looks to have the first half start cooler than normal followed by a return to normal temperatures for the second half of the month.  Precipitation will be normal or slightly above normal for September. Normal rainfall is currently 1-1.5 inches per two weeks dropping to about an inch per two weeks for the second half of September. Even though we expect rainfall at or slightly above normal in September, there is a great deal of uncertainty due to the tropics and where those systems will travel. So you will want to pay attention to later outlooks at https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov

Rainfall for the first half of September will average 0.50-2.00 inches. The heaviest rains will likely surround the state of Ohio in most directions.

16 day precipitation forecast

16 day precipitation outlook

October into part of November looks to resume the above-normal temperatures which should create an extended autumn this year. Rainfall remains highly uncertain but it appears near normal is the most likely outcome for October and November as we have some climate models showing above normal and some below normal rainfall.

The early outlook for winter calls for above-normal temperatures the first half and below normal temperatures second half. Precipitation is likely to become above normal with potential influences from the tropical Pacific Ocean.

Derecho Devastates the Midwest While Ohio’s Dry-Weather Pattern Continues

By Aaron Wilson

Midwest Derecho

On Monday, August 10, 2020, a powerful weather system is known as a derecho (pronounced “deh-REY-cho”) impacted nine states from South Dakota to Ohio (Figure 1). The National Weather Service defines a derecho as a long-lived windstorm that produces widespread damage like a tornado but in one direction along a straight path or “straight-line wind damage.”  Last week’s derecho was exceptionally damaging to agricultural interests, particularly in Iowa. Numerous reports of winds stronger than 70 mph were noted with an unofficial gust to 106 mph at Le Grand. According to the Iowa Soybean Association, the latest USDA reports suggests 14 million impacted crop acres with $6 billion in liability losses. Only minor damage was reported in northwest Ohio as the derecho weakened below severe limits Monday evening, but it brought a decent round of rainfall to the area. The last major derecho to occur in Ohio was on June 29, 2012, which brought 22 fatalities from Illinois to the Mid-Atlantic and $2.9 billion in losses.

8-10-20 Derecho Map

8-10-20 Derecho Map

Figure 1:  Preliminary storm reports associated with the August 10, 2020 derecho.

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Climate and Hydrology Pattern to Relax in August

16-day Mean PrecipitationThe overall drier pattern in many but not all places in Ohio this summer appears like it will relax closer to normal in August. The greatest uncertainty with the outlook will center around how the tropical moisture impacts the eastern United States.

The August outlook for temperatures indicates 1-2F above normal but a lot closer to normal than what we have seen this summer with the heat. The last time we have seen this much hot weather was 2015 and 2012. The good news is the worst of the heat for 2020 appears over. What this means is we should see a lot more maximum temperatures in the 80s with some 90s thrown in. Expected minimum temperatures mostly in the 60s to lower 70s. Continue reading

Application of Manure to Double Crop Soybeans

By Glen Arnold, OSU Extension

Wheatfields have been or will be harvested in Ohio soon and some farmers will plant double-crop soybeans. In recent years there has been more interest from livestock producers in applying manure to newly planted soybeans to provide moisture to help get the crop to emerge.

Both swine and dairy manure can be used to add moisture to newly planted soybeans. It’s important that the soybeans were properly covered with soil when planted to keep a barrier between the salt and nitrogen in the manure and the germinating soybean seed. It’s also important that livestock producers know their soil phosphorus levels, and the phosphorus in the manure being applied, so soil phosphorus levels are kept an acceptable range. Continue reading

National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) Updates

Sometimes this information is helpful in your farm management decisions. The National Ag Statics Service (NASS) sends different updates throughout the year.  This week was a big week of updates for the Great Lakes Region.  I am including those PDF updates links below.

Ohio Weekly Crop Progress & Condition Report

Ohio Acreage Summary

Ohio June 1 Grain Stocks

Ohio May Agricultural Prices

Ohio Biotechnology Varieties

Grain Market Summer Update June 30 – 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

State Climatology Field Specialist, Aaron Wilson, and Ben Brown, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice in Agricultural Risk Management, both with The Ohio State University will give summer weather and grain market update after the release of the 2020 Acreage and Grain Stocks Reports from the United States Department of Agriculture. Due to the Coronavirus, economic conditions for corn changed rapidly after the Prospective Plantings Report with likely changes in acreage for the Eastern Corn-Belt. Weather, as always, during July and August will play a major factor in final yields and production in 2020.

June 30, 2020, from 2:00 PM until 3:30 PM

Registration link at https://osu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_C-NDZU3IRya0SYMkMKlC0A

Warmer and wetter, Ohio’s climate is shifting

By Alayna DeMartini

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Little snow, warmer days. It’s been an unusual winter.

Or has it?

For the past four decades, Ohio’s winters have been warming twice as fast as its summers. And the state is getting more rainfall as well. 2019 was the sixth wettest year in Ohio and the 12th warmest, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

“It was certainly our wettest decade on record,” Wilson said.

On average, Ohio’s annual rainfall has increased 5%–15% since the early 1900s, with the largest increases in areas such as north-central Ohio where fall rainfall has risen by 31%, Wilson said. Continue reading

2020 Northwest Ohio Crops Day

Received from Garth Ruff, Extension Educator, Henry County

Join Henry County OSU Extension Office on Friday, February 7 from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for the 2020 Northwest Ohio Crops Day at the Bavarian Haus (3814 SR 18, Deshler, Ohio). Highlighting this year’s program is Greg Roth, Penn State University Extension grain crops specialist. Other speakers include Ben Brown, Mark Loux, Aaron Wilson, Greg Labarge, and Bruce Clevenger. Vendors will also be onsite.

The registration fee is $35 by January 30, or $45 after the deadline. Light breakfast, lunch, and a presentation folder are included in the registration fee. Register at 419-592-0806 or ruff.72@osu.edu.

Education credits offered are:  1-hr ODA Fertilizer Recert; 3-hrs ODA Private Pesticide (Cat 1, 2, 6, CORE) Recert; 2.5-hrs ODA Commercial Pesticide (CORE, 2c, 10c); and 4.5-hrs CCA.

Please see the schedule of the day here: https://cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com/u.osu.edu/dist/4/75282/files/2019/12/2020-NW-OH-Crops-Day-Web-Flyer_Page_1.jpg

Farmers need to gear up for more rain

By Aaron Wilson, Climate Specialist, CFAES

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Weather extremes like those during 2018, much more rain, and heavier downpours are likely to become the norm rather than the exception in Ohio, according to a climate expert with The Ohio State University.

As a result, the state’s farmers will have to deal with more and more water pouring onto and running off of their fields, and that could threaten the quality of water downstream, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). Continue reading