Farm Science Review Tickets Still Available until Monday

Picture courtesy of Farm Science Review

There is still time until Monday to get tickets. The 59th annual Farm Science Review is set for September 21-23 at Ohio State’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38, near London. The full program is located at https://fsr.osu.edu/sites/fsr/files/imce/Information/FSR%202021%20Full%20Program%20with%20Maps%20Gatefold.pdf 

Featured at the event will be more than 100 educational sessions, including “Ask the Expert” talks; 600 exhibits; the most comprehensive field crop demonstrations in the United States; a career exploration fair; and immersive virtual reality videos of agricultural activities.

This year’s Farm Science Review will also feature a new online component called “Farm Science Review Live.”

Hours for Farm Science Review are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 21–22 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 23.

Tickets are available at our office, $7 each. Either cash or check payable to OSU Extension Paulding County is accepted. Tickets are $10 at the gate. Ages 5 and under are free admittance. Currently, the Paulding County Office is back in our offices after our remodel. You will see a new facelift in the office. Please ask Katie for tickets.

Ohio Sheep Day

The Ohio State University Department of Animal Sciences and Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) are excited to announce that the 2021 Ohio Sheep Day will be held live, in-person on Saturday, October 2nd at the OARDC Small Ruminant Center located at 5651 Fredericksburg Road, Wooster, OH 44691. This year’s program will offer attendees the opportunity to visit one of Ohio State’s research stations that focuses on efficient ruminant livestock and forage production. Continue reading

Rapid Increase in Ivermectin Prescriptions and Reports of Severe Illness Associated with Use of Products Containing Ivermectin to Prevent or Treat COVID-19

From Center for Disease Control (CDC – Press Release August 26, 2021)

Summary
Ivermectin is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescription medication used to treat certain infections caused by internal and external parasites. When used as prescribed for approved indications, it is generally safe and well-tolerated.During the COVID-19 pandemic, ivermectin dispensing by retail pharmacies has increased, as has the use of veterinary formulations available over the counter but not intended for human use. FDA has cautioned about the potential risks of use for prevention or treatment of COVID-19.

Ivermectin is not authorized or approved by FDA for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel has also determined that there are currently insufficient data to recommend ivermectin for treatment of COVID-19. ClinicalTrials.gov has listings of ongoing clinical trials that might provide more information about these hypothesized uses in the future. Continue reading

Manure Science Review Coming August 10th

By Glen Arnold- OSU Extension

The annual Manure Science Review will be held on Tuesday, August 10 from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at MVP Dairy near Celina, Ohio. Attendees will see and hear about this state-of-the-art dairy’s 80-cow rotary milking parlor, manure handling and management for the 4,400-cow herd, and regenerative farming practices. Speakers will provide updates on the effectiveness of saturated buffers in reducing runoff in Grand Lake Saint Marys as well as issues of legacy phosphorus runoff and the KDS/Quick wash system for manure nutrient recovery. Field demonstrations will include solid and liquid applicators, the Cadman Side-dress System, Oxbo Equipment, in-season manure side-dress demos, and more.

Continuing education credits have been approved for Certified Crop Advisors, Certified Livestock Managers, and Indiana State Chemist certifications. Registration costs are $25 per person until August 1st and $30 per person after that date. For program and registration details, click on the link at ocamm.osu.edu or contact Mary Wicks (wicks.14@osu.edu; 330.202.3533).

Management Considerations for Beef x Dairy Calves

Regardless of the genetics of cattle, you’re feeding, you will find value in listening to this three-part webinar series.

This article originally appeared in the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter at https://u.osu.edu/beef/2021/05/12/management-considerations-for-beef-x-dairy-calves/

During the first session (embedded below) held on April 21 the focus was on marketing dairy beef calves and featured Larry Rose and JT Loewe of JBS as they discussed the quality of the cattle they seek to purchase, their pricing structure, and the demands they have for high quality, consistently sized and correctly finished dairy crossed beef cattle. Regardless of the genetics being fed, the speakers shared a strong message for the value of consistency and proper finish the market is demanding in all fed cattle. Garth Ruff, Ohio State University Extension Beef Field Specialist, and Jerad Jaborek, Feedlot Systems Extension Educator at Michigan State University, hosted a three-part webinar series on management considerations for beef sired calves from dairy cows that covered a variety of topics related to marketing, genetics, and management of crossbred beef x dairy cattle.

Continue reading

Livestock and Grain Producers: Dealing with Vomitoxin and Zearalenone

Vomitoxin in the 2020 corn crop continues to plague both livestock and grain producers. Livestock producers are trying to decide how best to manage corn and corn by-products with high levels of vomitoxin, and those who grow corn are trying to decide how best to avoid vomitoxin contamination in 2021.

In the 15 minute video below, OSU Extension Educations John Barker, Rob Leeds, and Jacci Smith discuss where and why this year’s vomitoxin issues originated, considerations for avoiding problems in coming years, how it impacts livestock, and what’s involved in testing grain for vomitoxin.

Beef Newsletter

From Stan Smith, OSU Extension

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle Producers-

Six new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1235 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Last week we offered suggestions for seedbed preparation and planting the new forage seeding. This week, Christine Gelley offers detail on forage seed selection. And, it may be March Madness for college basketball enthusiasts, but it’s spring training for Major League Baseball, and the bulls still waiting in the bullpen to get the call!

Articles this week include:

  • Selecting Forages for Your New Seeding
  • Taking the Bull from the Sale Ring or Winter Storage, Making Him the Athlete He Needs to Be
  • Minerals for Beef Cattle
  • Livestock and Grain Producers: Dealing with Vomitoxin and Zearalenone
  • Weighing the Options
  • March 1, 2021 Cattle on Feed Inventory up 1.6% from 2020

Continue reading

Recap of the Virtual Jr. Swine Day in Ohio 2021

From Dale Ricker, OSU Extension Swine Program Specialist

The Junior Swine Day recording can be found at the link below. This is great to show to your 4-Hers and FFA members taking Swine Projects.  Additionally, there is a Showmanship Video.

Video from the event: https://osu.zoom.us/rec/share/jgIGuk8mUJw-rwcxGv-D7tiMfAsBxx1fL6hciXrCfpaMvjGLZO9rXWZ2U4vrpXzH.apQP95CSC3pR4juh

Showmanship video: https://youtu.be/TwrEyYgVVvw

Ohio Pork Information Center Website:   http://porkinfo.osu.edu/

Contact Information:

Dale Ricker, OSU Swine Extension Program Specialist
Phone: 419-523-6294
Putnam County OSU Extension
1206 E. 2nd. Street
Ottawa, Ohio 45875

Resource Kit Available for Those Exploring a Meat Processing Business

A team of Ohio State business and meat science specialists has compiled a Meat Processing Business Tool Kit for people who are exploring the meat processing business. Designed as a decision-making aid for people exploring investing in or expanding a meat processing facility, this online tool kit can help entrepreneurs evaluate the business and navigate business planning. The Meat Processing Business Tool Kit may be found linked here on the OSU South Centers webpage.

This “Tool Kit” is designed to be intuitive as entrepreneurs move through the business planning process.

2021 Beef School Opportunities

As we march into 2021, we want to share some opportunities for beef cattle producer education coming up this winter. While we’d much rather be in person, this year we are going to offer virtual programming. Additional information can be found at go.osu.edu/2021beefschool.

2021 Cow-Calf Outlook Meeting – January 26, 6.30 p.m. (Flyer) (Register Here)
Dr. Kenny Burdine, University of Kentucky Livestock Marketing Specialist

2021 Ohio Cattle Feeding Webinar – February 24, 6:00 p.m. (Flyer) (Register Here)
Risk Management Livestock Risk Protection and Livestock Gross Margin Insurance – Justin White, Hudson Insurance
Feedlot Ventilation Requirements – Jason Hartschuh, OSU Extension Crawford County

2021 Ohio Cow-Calf Management Schools Webinars (Register Here) One Registration Link for all Sessions.

  • 1/18/2021: Getting Started: Making Hay for Beef Cattle (Reviewing Forage Fertility – Jason Hartsuch; New Seeding Species Selection – Christine Gelley)
  • 1/25/2021: Addressing Hay Shortfalls (Annual Forage Options – Allen Gahler; Baleage Do’s and Don’ts – Jason Hartschuh)
  • 2/01/2021: Hay! Now What? (Forage Analysis – Ted Wiseman; Forage Storage 101 – Garth Ruff)
  • 2/08/2021: Cow-Calf Management: Breeding Season Considerations (Managing the Breeding Season – Alvaro Garcia-Guerra; EPD Update: Breeding for Cow Longevity – John Grimes)
  • 2/15/2021 Managing Reproduction (Semen Handling – Dean Kreager; Pregnancy Checking – Allen Gahler)
  • 2/22/2021: Improving Profits (Making Cow Culling Decisions – Dean Kreager; Maximizing Feeder Calf Value – Garth Ruff)

Beef Sire Selection for the Dairy Herd Webinar – March 10, 2021, 12:00 p.m. (Flyer) (Register Here)
Presenter: Allen Gahler, OSU Extension Sandusky County

Fall Forage Management Tips

Alfalfa Field

By Mark Sulc, OSU Extension

Fall is a great time to take care of some very important aspects of managing forage hayfields and pastures. Below is a list of things that when done in the fall can help avoid big headaches this winter and next spring or even next summer.

  • One of the most important things to do now is to pull soil samples and get a soil test. Ask for the 2020 Tri-State Fertility Recommendations to be applied to the results. Apply fertilizer to correct any soil deficiencies and replace nutrients that were removed in hay and silage. Fall is a great time to apply both P and K to prepare established forage stands for winter. Soil sampling and testing are especially critical in preparation for making new forage seedings next spring or summer. Now is the time to apply lime to raise low soil pH levels for next year’s seedings. Soil preparation now will also help you be ready to plant when the first break in the weather comes next spring. Many headaches with forage stands can be greatly alleviated with proper fertility levels. Deficient fertility leads to weak forage stands that are susceptible to stresses (including winter injury) and especially weed invasion. Links to additional soil fertility resources can be found at https://forages.osu.edu/forage-management/soil-fertility-forages. Continue reading

OSU Extension Hires New Field Specialist Focusing on Beef Cattle

By:  Cheryl Buck, OSU Extension Communication Manager

Garth Ruff has been selected as the new field specialist, beef cattle for Ohio State University Extension in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University, per Jackie Kirby Wilkins, interim director of OSU Extension. This full-time appointment is effective on September 1, 2020.

“We are extremely pleased to be partnering with our CFAES Department of Animal Sciences to jointly fund this important position, which will work in tandem with our research faculty and our commodity and industry partners, as well as producers and community stakeholders to translate and apply the newest university knowledge to meet the timely and most critical issues facing the beef industry in Ohio,” said Wilkins. Continue reading

Poultry Litter Application

Loading poultry litter

By Glen Arnold, OSU Extension

Stockpiles of poultry litter can be seen in farm fields across Ohio. While common each year in wheat stubble fields, there also many stockpiles in soybean fields. Poultry litter is an excellent source of plant nutrients and readily available in most parts of the state.

Poultry litter can be from laying hens, pullets, broilers, finished turkeys, turkey hens, or poults. Most of the poultry litter in the state comes from laying hens and turkey finishers. Typical nutrient ranges in poultry litter can be from 45 to 57 pounds of nitrogen, 45 to 70 pounds of P2O5, and 45 to 55 pounds of K2O per ton. The typical application rate is two tons per acre which fits nicely with the P2O5 needs of a two-year corn/soybean rotation. Continue reading

Application of Manure to Double Crop Soybeans

By Glen Arnold, OSU Extension

Wheatfields have been or will be harvested in Ohio soon and some farmers will plant double-crop soybeans. In recent years there has been more interest from livestock producers in applying manure to newly planted soybeans to provide moisture to help get the crop to emerge.

Both swine and dairy manure can be used to add moisture to newly planted soybeans. It’s important that the soybeans were properly covered with soil when planted to keep a barrier between the salt and nitrogen in the manure and the germinating soybean seed. It’s also important that livestock producers know their soil phosphorus levels, and the phosphorus in the manure being applied, so soil phosphorus levels are kept an acceptable range. Continue reading

2020 Paulding County Jr. Fair Buyer Add-On Packet Now Available

From Sarah Noggle, Extension Educator, Agriculture, and Natural Resources, Paulding County with an excerpt from Michael Schweinsberg, Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, Paulding County’s blog post.

This week is one of my favorite weeks of the year, but this year this week is bittersweet. Usually, the first county fair in the State of Ohio, our fairgrounds and barns, are sitting empty. You won’t hear the laughter of 4-H and FFA members from the barns.

Our hats go off to the Paulding County Sr. and Jr. Fairboards as this tough decision was made a few weeks ago. The economic impact on the fair board with social distancing and other guidelines made it almost economically impossible to hold the fair. While this situation does stink, especially, because fair is where my heart is personally every summer. This is because of the connections I have developed over the years.  While this year’s pandemic has put a wrench in the fair plan, the plan was already in another person’s hands that we have learned to live by faith with.

Our Paulding County 4-H and FFA members are some of the best kids around. They are hard-working, honest, community-serving, and they look out for each other. While 4-H and FFA are looking different in 2020, these youth are still alive and resilient. They have learned one of the hardest lessons in life through the COVID-19 Pandemic. Many of our county youth have completed all the requirements (quality assurance, skillathon, livestock record keeping books, club or chapter meetings, community service, and a demonstration) to exhibit and show an animal at the county fair in a typical year. They didn’t give up even though the fair was canceled.

Our Paulding County 4-H and FFA members have managed to shine through their respective organization mottos – “To Make the Best Better” (4-H) and “Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live and Living to Serve” (FFA). These youth are learning the true meaning of livestock markets today. They are seeing what it is like to be raising livestock in a lower economy.  The child and their families who have completed these projects have more than likely thought through, “What are they in this for, and what do they hope to gain?”

As a 4-H advisor, I have heard from parents comments like, “I am glad my kids had animals in the barn to keep them working during quarantine; My kids have a reason to get up on time and stay active; These are still some of the best life lessons; I am glad for these animals because my kids would have probably been playing video games during all this time at home; These animals are truly providing food for our family; This isn’t at all about winning, it’s about life lessons.”

As a mom to two current 4-Hers/FFA member, I wish they could be at their favorite vacation spot of the year, but I know these kids will be okay.  They are alive and healthy. They are still members of this community. They have learned some of the best but hardest lessons in life. It’s how they handle these lessons that make them stronger.

While the youth might now be showing animals this week, they are learning more significant lessons in life. They are still learning:

  1. Citizenship in our community
  2. Effective Leadership Skills
  3. Goal Setting
  4. Sense of Belonging
  5. Independence
  6. Mastery
  7. Generosity

The youth have learned it’s not about the ribbon, prize, or trophy. It’s not about winning because you spent thousands and thousands of dollars on an animal or for bragging rights.  Those things aren’t what the kids remember from the county fair.

They remember the good times. They are truly missing out on being with their fellow 4-Hers and FFA members. They are missing out on the non-related family bonding with the friendships they developed over the years at the fair. It’s the club booths and floats (which they sometimes complain about doing), then walking down the up and down the midway, hanging out in the barns, it’s the FFA Sausage Sandwiches, the Grover Hill Homemade Ice Cream, and the safety of our small hometown fair. It’s seeing our community pull together for the greater good, whether it’s physical labor or monetary donations.

Our Paulding County Fair is not the largest or flashiest in the state, but it’s ours, and we value it. Our Paulding County agricultural community is robust. The loyalty and camaraderie among us are more significant than words can describe. Reach out to your 4-H and FFA members and their families this week. While there is not an official livestock sale, our kids still have outlets for their livestock projects. If you would even like to support the 4-H or FFA members, please see the form below.

A special Thank you to all those still working so hard for our 4-H and FFA youth – 4-H Educator – Michael Schweinsberg; Jr. Fairboard Advisors– Tony Miller, Abram Klopfenstein, Luke Jackson, Pam White; Sr. Fairboard Members – Dan Howell, Heather Cooper, Kenny Speice, Lori Davis, Gus Davis, Bruce Farquhar, Corey Carnahan, Luke Jackson, Abram Klopfenstein, Francis Saxton, Sue Miller, Mel White, Austin Howell, Jacob Turner, Randy Tressler, Jonathon Rose, Lisa Hefner, Brian Yenser, Austin Conlon; 4-H Advisors-Brittany Clevenger, Austin Conlon, Heather Cooper, Suzanne Cooper, Brenda Doster, Erin Finfrock, Lindsay Franklin, Ruth Graham, Amanda Grimes, Lisa Hefner, Dorothy Hoagland,  Alexis Howell, Dan Howell, Deb Howell, Jandra Kilgore, Cherry Klopfenstein, Jerry Klopfenstein, Mary Kupfersmith, Julie McCloud, Nikki McClure, Mandy Miller, Sue Miller, Ryan Noggle, Jerrolyn Parrett, Linda Reineck, Lindsay Schabbing, Beth Schweinsberg, Pat Spitnale, Amanda Stoller, Tracy Trausch, Gina Weidenhamer, Pam White, Deb Wiley, Krisi Williams, Jennifer Workman, Hillary Zijlstra, Amber Zuber; FFA Advisors-Staci Miller, Lori Heiby, Jacquelin Mosier and Mike Miller; Hats off to each and everyone of you. You are all a part of helping these youth grow and succeed.

Sarah Noggle, Extension Educator, Agriculture, and Natural Resouces, Paulding County.  

Excerpt from the 4-H Blog – The link below will open the 2020 Paulding County Jr. Fair Buyer Add-On packet.  On behalf of all Paulding County youth and volunteers, we thank you for your continued support of our 4-H and FFA youth.  Please note that the address for payment has changed for this year.  The address to send the form and payment is located on the add-on form.

2020 Buyer Add-On Packet

CFAP Program for Beef Producers

By David Marrison, OSU Extension, marrison.2@osu.edu

Click here to access a PDF version of the article

Since the beginning of January, market prices for major commodities have fallen sharply since COVID-19 reached the United States.  There have been many efforts through federal and state legislation to offset the impact of COVID-19.

Enrollment is currently being taken by the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) for one such program targeted to help agricultural producers.  This program called the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) is providing financial assistance for losses experienced as a result of lost demand, short-term oversupply, and shipping pattern disruptions caused by COVID-19. Continue reading

Direct Marketing of Meat

By: Rob Leeds, Garth Ruff, Peggy Hall, Jacci Smith, and Tony Nye, OSU Extension

Producers who are seeking to increase income are looking for different ways to market their livestock. Direct to consumer marketing of livestock products is one-way producers are seeking to increase profits in their livestock sales. When exploring direct market possibilities there are several factors farmers must consider: regulations, consumer preference, marketing strategies, and pricing. Continue reading

COVID-19 Impact on Ohio Sheep Producers

By Tim Barnes OSU Extension, Marion County

Lambs are just one of the many agricultural commodities that have been disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. There is never a good time for a pandemic to strike, but COVID-19 hit the sheep industry at the traditional best market price.  Spring lambs are a family favorite for traditional Easter meals (April 12), Orthodox Easter (April 23), the Muslin feasts of Ramadan (April 23 to May 23), some Jewish sects for Passover (April 8-16), and the secular May 10 Mother’s Day celebration.

America’s biggest market for fresh lamb is in the area from Baltimore to Boston.  Major East Coast packers relay on the close location of Ohio producers (Ohio has the 5th most producers in the US) to provide a steady source of fresh lamb.  The “white tablecloth restaurants” and the other segments of the foodservice industry account for over 50% of the United State lamb consumption.  As demand builds back to pre-pandemic levels, Ohio lambs will continue to be a large part of the East coast supply chain. Continue reading

COVID-19 Impact on Ohio’s Beef Industry

by: Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Henry County.

COVID-19 has had profound impacts on our food and livestock production systems here in the U.S. With regards to the beef industry the impact has been felt locally and throughout the country. Locally here in Ohio, with the JBS plant in Souderton closed, and reduced packing capacity in other regional packing plants, the local cash market for fed cattle has been greatly diminished. For the past two weeks, auction markets in the state have asked cattle feeders to hold off on bringing fed cattle to market due to packing plant closures and overall lack of packer demand.

Like most of agriculture, timing is critical for the livestock production supply chain to flow as it is designed. What is the impact of holding market-ready cattle in local feedlots? Economically, cash flow concerns for small to medium size cattle feeders may arise as packing capacity remains limited. Immediate impacts for cattle feeders include increasing days on feed, selling heavier and potentially higher yield grade cattle once the market returns. Most packing plants have discount schedules of Yield Grade 4 and 5 cattle in addition to carcass weight specifications. Continue reading

Meat vs COVID-19; The good, the bad and the ugly of supply and demand

by: Stan Smith, OSU Extension, Fairfield County

To suggest that supply in local meat cases has been disrupted since schools closed and ‘stay-at-home’ orders were issued last month might be an understatement.

The good is simply this. We have more than adequate supplies of market-ready livestock on the farm to accommodate the consumer’s demand for meat.

The bad is that COVID-19 caused disruption to the meat supply chain that created short term shortages in the meat case, and fluctuations of price in both the meat case and especially livestock at the farm. Continue reading