Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2020-21

Thursday, August 26th, 2021
Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management

Ohio cropland varies significantly in its production capabilities and, consequently, cropland values and cash rents vary widely throughout the state. Generally, western Ohio cropland values and cash rents differ from much of southern and eastern Ohio cropland values and cash rents. The primary factors affecting these values and rents are land productivity and potential crop return, and the variability of those crop returns. Soils, fertility, and drainage/irrigation capabilities are primary factors that most influence land productivity, crop return and variability of those crop returns.

Other factors impacting land values and cash rents may include field size and shape, field accessibility, market access, local market prices, field perimeter characteristics and potential for wildlife damage, buildings and grain storage, previous tillage system and crops, tolerant/resistant weed populations, USDA Program Yields, population density, and competition for the cropland in a region. Factors specific to cash rental rates may include services provided by the operator and specific conditions of the lease.

The Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents study was conducted from January through April in 2021. The opinion-based study surveyed professionals with a knowledge of Ohio’s cropland values and rental rates. Professionals surveyed were rural appraisers, agricultural lenders, professional farm managers, ag business professionals, OSU Extension educators, farmers, landowners, and Farm Service Agency personnel.

The study results are based on 94 surveys. Respondents were asked to group their estimates based on three land quality classes: average, top, and poor. Within each land-quality class, respondents were asked to estimate average corn and soybean yields for a five-year period based on typical farming practices. Survey respondents were also asked to estimate current bare cropland values and cash rents negotiated in the current or recent year for each land-quality class. Survey results are summarized below for western Ohio with regional summaries (subsets of western Ohio) for northwest Ohio and southwest Ohio.

According to the Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, cropland values in western Ohio are expected to increase in 2021 by 3.8 to 5.3 percent depending on the region and land class. Cash rents are expected to increase from 3.6 to 3.9 percent depending on the region and land class.

For the complete survey research summary go to the OSU Extension Farm Office website at:

https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-management-tools/farm-management-publications/cash-rents

Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2020-21

Paulding County Agricultural Scholarship from the Agronomy Committee

The Paulding County Agronomy Committee is pleased to offer their Agricultural Scholarship again in 2021.

This yearly scholarship (approximately $200) is funded with interest from a $5000 gift in November of 1995 from the Paulding County Agronomy Committee, Inc. to the Paulding County 4-H and Youth Endowment Fund.  Please see the link for the application, deadlines and guidelines.

2021 Paulding County Agronomy Scholarship

 

Farmer Advocates wanted!

Do you know of a farmer who would be an excellent candidate with leadership, enthusiasm, and passion for soil health and water quality management as a Farmer Advocate for Conservation? You can nominate them by completing an online form. Select the button for the application.

The Nature Conservancy is looking for farmers who are currently utilizing cover crops on their farms in the Maumee River Watershed of the Western Lake Erie Basin. We are looking for a diverse group of farmers; large acreage, small acreage, corn and soy, small grains, livestock, new and experienced, willing to reach out and share their knowledge and experiences with other farmers in their area. Selected farmers will be compensated for their time. Select the button for this application.

If you are interested in being part of this exciting farmer-led outreach project and would like to apply as a Farmer Advocate for Conservation please complete the online application form by selecting the button above.

The application period is open for farmers in the Western Lake Erie Basin that are interested in sharing their conservation farming practices with other farmers.  Farmer Advocates will be compensated for their time to attend the training and work with other farmers @ $30/hour.  The focus of the project is to promote farmers learning from each other about building soil health and managing water.

To apply as a Farmer Advocate for Conservation or to nominate a farmer you believe would be an excellent candidate please use the online application and nomination forms on the landing page found at https://sites.google.com/view/farmeradvocate or please contact Stephanie Singer, Stephanie.Singer@tnc.org.

Agricultural Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage for the 2021 Crop Year

by: Mary Griffith, Chris Zoller, Hallie Williams, OSU Extension Educators

Enrollment for the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs for the 2021 crop year opened in October, with the deadline to enroll and make amendments to program elections on March 15, 2021. This signup is for potential payments for the 2021 crop.

If changes are not made by the March 15th deadline, the selection defaults to the programs selected for the 2020 crop year with no penalty. While it is optional to make changes to program elections, producers are required to enroll (sign a contract) each year to be eligible to receive payments. So, even if you do not change your program elections, you will still need to make an appointment at the Farm Service Agency to sign off on enrollment for the 2021 crop year by that March 15th deadline.

Producers have the option to enroll covered commodities in either ARC-County, ARC-Individual, or PLC. Program elections are made on a crop-by-crop basis unless selecting ARC-Individual where all crops under that FSA Farm Number fall under that program. These are the same program options that were available to producers during the 2019 and 2020 crop years. In some cases, producers may want to amend program election to better manage the potential risks facing their farms during the 2021 crop year. Continue reading

2020 Virtual Agricultural Lender Seminar

Join OSU Extension in 2020 Virtual Agricultural Lender Seminar

Wednesday, October 21, 2020
9:00 am—12:00 pm
Registration Is Now Open
Link: http://go.osu.edu/2020AgLenderSeminarReg
Cost $25

Topics and speakers:

  • Grain Prices and Farm Policy – Ben Brown, OSU AEDE
  • Enterprise Budgets and Returns per Acre – Barry Ward, OSU Extension
  • Niche/Small Farm Legal Issues – Peggy Hall, OSU Extension
  • Growing Customer Relationships – Rob Leads, OSU Extension
  • U.S. Ag & Financial Conditions – David Oppedahl, Federal Reserve Bank, Chicago

Feel free to contact OSU Extension Defiance County at 419-782-4771 or walters.269@osu.edu

Recap of this week’s OSU Extension Farm Office Live

The video recap of October 7, 2020, 8:00-9:30 a.m.

The October 7th session included updates on the second round of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP 2), 2020 crop enterprise budgets, farm custom rates, COVID immunity legislation, and other emerging legal and economic issues.

Download October 7 slides

 

H2Ohio Reminder

Fall Nutrient Applicator and Tractor

By Glen Arnold, CCA, OSU Extension

Harvest is starting and farmers participating in the H2Ohio program are reminded that any fall fertilizer applications, including manure, need to be approved by their local Soil & Water Conservation Districts. This will assure the application is in compliance with their Voluntary Nutrient Management Plan and there will be no problems with the payment process.

Many farmers will be working with their local fertilizer dealerships for fertilizer recommendations, but it is still a requirement to get approval from your local Soil and Water Conservation District before the fertilizer or manure is applied.

New Program from Paulding SWCD

The Paulding Soil & Water Conservation District is pleased to announce the launch of a new cost-share program called the Lower Auglaize Nutrient & Sediment Reduction Program (NSRP) for producers in Paulding County. Funding is limited in this program so be sure to contact me as soon as possible. Check below for program details. Continue reading

Sign up for USDA-CFAP Direct Support to Begin May 26, 2020

Ben Brown, Peggy Kirk Hall, David Marrison, Dianne Shoemaker, and Barry Ward
The Ohio State University

Since the enactment of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act on March 27, 2020, and the announcement of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) on April 17, 2020, producers in Ohio and across the country have been anxiously awaiting additional details on how the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) will provide financial assistance for losses experienced as a result of lost demand, short-term oversupply and shipping pattern disruptions caused by COVID-19.

The additional details on CFAP eligibility, payment limitations, payment rates, and enrollment timeline arrived on May 19, 2020, when the USDA issued its Final Rule for CFAP.  In this article, we explain the Final Rule in this issue of News from the Farm Office. Continue reading

Message from The Nature Conservancy about a New Program for the Maumee Valley Watershed

From The Nature Conservancy Newsletter
We are looking for a diverse group of farmers; large acreage, small acreage, corn and soy, small grains, livestock, new and experienced who are willing to be trained to reach out and share their knowledge with other farmers.  “This is an opportunity for farmers to take the knowledge they’ve gained on their own farm and make an impact in a larger area.  We want people (farmers) who realize the importance of soil health goes beyond their own farms and who want to see farming be successful.  The future of farming depends on soil health,”  said Stephanie Singer, outreach education specialist at the Western Lake Erie Basin Project Office.  If you are interested in being part of this exciting farmer-led outreach project please complete the online Farmer Advocate for Conservation Application, Click Here!

Continue reading

Grant Opportunity from Paulding SWCD for Blue Creek, Middle Creek, Prairie Creek, Flatrock Creek, Little Flatrock Creek, and Wildcat Creek

Paulding SWCD was awarded a grant with the Ohio Department of Agriculture to lead a watershed program with efforts focused on improving water quality with a focus on soil health, wetlands, controlled drainage, waterways/filter strips just to name a few. The goal of this watershed program is to adopt the best management practices listed and pursue funding to implement the BMPs.

There are a number of grant opportunities available right now to us right now through various sources. Paulding SWCD looking for your input on a list of projects/practices that you would like to do on your land which we could seek funding for. Our efforts are focused in the following watersheds that drain to the Auglaize River: Blue Creek, Middle Creek, Prairie Creek, Flatrock Creek, Little Flatrock Creek, and Wildcat Creek. See the map in the picture

We are looking for the following projects to pursue grant funding for:

  • Blind Inlets
  • Livestock manure storage
  • Wetland Restoration/Enhancement
  • Grassed Waterways

Information on each of these practices can be found at https://agbmps.osu.edu/bmp.

If you wish to implement one of the following practices, want to discuss in detail, need info on any of the practices please reach out to me via email at patrick.troyer@pauldingswcd.org or by phone 419-670-4499 by June 1, 2020.

WHIP Not Only Applies to Baseball- Enrollment at FSA Now Open!

By: Ben Brown & David Marrison, The Ohio State University

Click Here for PDF Version of Article

Historically, Midwest producers have seen the acronym WHIP and associated it with the baseball statistic (Walks plus Hits per Inning Pitched), a statistic used to cross evaluate pitchers. However, Midwest producers might find it beneficial to participate in a federal aid program through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) with the same acronym, Wildfires, and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus (WHIP+).

Ohio producers have rarely qualified for WHIP+ because the weather eligibility requirements could not be met. However, when President Trump signed the Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act in June 2019 it provided more than $3 billion to the USDA for WHIP+ to help US producers who were affected by natural disasters in 2018 and 2019. WHIP+ builds on its predecessor program the 2017 Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program (2017 WHIP) that was authorized by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. Continue reading

COVID-19 – Impacts on Ohio’s Swine Industry

by: Steve Moeller, Department of Animal Sciences, State Swine Extension Specialist

Like many livestock sectors, the impact of COVID-19 on Ohio’s and the Nation’s swine industry have been multi-factorial and ever-changing.  In response, the National Pork Board has maintained an on-line COVID-19 information center at https://www.pork.org/ which is updated multiple times per day based on new findings.  The impact is now being felt as the number of ‘short-term’ packing plant closures seem to increase daily. Plant closures will impact the industry as a whole in a number of ways, namely: 1) U.S. production is matching packing plant capacity and both are at record levels, thus a regional lack of shackle space will likely occur, 2) Swine production is now nearly constant, centered around weekly flow and optimization of space utilization, thus pig spaces are full and need to be continually emptied to make room for incoming production, 3) Distribution channels from packing plants to consumers are not as efficient, leading to challenges in managing product movement from the packer to the consumer. Additional plant closures, particularly if they occur from Indiana eastward will place a significant burden directly on the producer; 4) The bright spot:  Export markets have helped offset some of the supply, particularly trade with traditional partners in Japan and Mexico, but with added sales to China.

Continue reading

April 10 AG Law Harvest

By: Peggy Kirk Hall, Friday, April 10th, 2020

Source: https://farmoffice.osu.edu/blog/fri-04102020-532pm/ag-law-harvest

Although many of us are quarantined at home these days, the gears of the legal world are still turning.  Here’s our gathering of recent notable news and legal developments:

Our Farm Office is open Monday Night! Join us for the Farm Office’s live online office hours this Monday night from 8—9:30 p.m.  Our team of experts will provide updates on the Paycheck Protection Program and the dairy economy and discuss COVID-19 macro-economic and export impacts, BWC dividends, property tax concerns, potential legal issues arising from COVID-19, and other issues you want to discuss.  Register at https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive.

What’s the deal with dicamba? Our partner, the National Agricultural Law Center, is hosting a free webinar on dicamba litigation on Wednesday, April 15 at noon EST.  “The Deal with Dicamba:  An Overview of Dicamba Related Litigation,” will feature attorney Brigit Rollins, who will review each of the dicamba lawsuits, the claims made by the plaintiffs, and what the outcome of each suit could mean for dicamba use in the United States.  Go to https://nationalaglawcenter.org/webinars/dicamba/ to learn more. Continue reading

H2Ohio Deadline For Accepting Applications Moved Back to March 31

Taken from Ohio Department of Agriculture and Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District

The deadline for farmers to submit applications for the H2Ohio program is moving back to the original date of March 31, 2020.

Governor DeWine strongly believes in the H2Ohio water quality initiative and farmers have shown overwhelming interest to implement the program’s best practices.  Our state and nation are facing an unprecedented economic crisis as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.  In an effort to preserve resources for H2Ohio, ODA is suspending the acceptance of new applications after March 31 but will continue to process all current applications.

ODA recently extended the deadline to accommodate workflow changes due to COVID-19 and ensure all applications could be processed electronically or via telecommunications.  The work transition has gone smoothly and all remaining applications will be handled similarly within the original timeline.

Further information regarding the H2Ohio program will be forthcoming.  Updates will be posted to this website and distributed through the Soil and Water Conservation Districts.  For a complete list of SWCD offices, go to http://h2.ohio.gov/agriculture/.

Additionally, information from the Paulding SWCD

Phone number to office 419-399-4771.  Link to the website for H2Ohio information http://www.pauldingswcd.org/technical-programs/h2ohio/

Meetings Planned for Farmers to Apply for H2Ohio Funds

$30 Million Available for Farmers Through Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio Plan

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda announced today that $30 million in H2Ohio funding will be available for Ohio farmers in more than a dozen counties beginning next month. The funds will be awarded as part of Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio plan to reduce agricultural phosphorus runoff and prevent algal blooms in Lake Erie.

“Since announcing the details of my H2Ohio plan in November, we’ve had a great deal of interest from farmers in the Maumee River Watershed who want to do their part to improve the health of Lake Erie,” said Governor DeWine. “H2Ohio will provide farm-by-farm support to help farmers minimize phosphorus runoff while increasing profit over the long-run.”

H2OhioFarmers living in the following 14 northwest Ohio counties will be eligible to apply for funds at their local Soil and Water Conservation Districts starting on February 1, 2020: Allen, Auglaize, Defiance, Fulton, Hancock, Hardin, Henry, Lucas, Mercer, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert, Williams, and Wood.

H2Ohio will fund investments in 10scientifically proven interventions to reduce nutrient runoff from agriculture, which is the primary cause for algal blooms in Lake Erie and elsewhere. Algal blooms can threaten drinking water and impact the health of both people and animals. Continue reading

Funding Available For Farmers Through Lake Erie Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE FROM ODA

Micaela Wright, (614) 752-9817, micaela.wright@agri.ohio.gov

FUNDING AVAILABLE FOR FARMERS THROUGH LAKE ERIE CONSERVATION RESERVE ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM

Farmers have until August 23, 2019 to apply

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (June 4, 2019) – The Ohio Department of Agriculture’s (ODA) Division of Soil and Water Conservation is making farmers aware of funding available to farmers through the Lake Erie Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP).

Continue reading

Funding Available to Western Lake Erie Basin Farmers to Improve Water Quality

From Daniel Foust and Patrick Troyer, Paulding SWCD

The Ohio Department of Agriculture, in partnership with the Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District is providing funding for new assistance programs for farmers to help protect water quality in the western basin of Lake Erie. The Ohio Working Lands program will encourage producers to establish year-round vegetative cover on eligible crop land. The program will promote conversion, establishment and maintenance of forage/hay land on certain cropland acres. Continue reading