Ohio Landowner/Hunter Access Partnership Program

Information provided by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources

Image: Ohio Department of Natural Resources

The Ohio Landowner/Hunter Access Partnership (OLHAP) Program is a new way for Ohio hunters to get access to private properties. This program is funded in part by the federal Farm Bill under their Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program (VPA-HIP). This bill provides funding to state and tribal agencies through a competitive grant process to implement programs encouraging hunting access on private properties. As part of the 2018 Farm Bill, Ohio was awarded $1,831,500 to implement the new OLHAP program. The OLHAP program uses part of those funds to pay landowners for hunters to access their property. Participating landowners receive annual payment rates ranging from $2.00 to $30.00 per acre depending on the characteristics of the property enrolled. Enrollment contracts are for 2-3 years, with the possibility of extension.

If you are a landowner interested in finding out more about the program or wishing to enroll your property, please complete the form at https://ohiodnr.gov/wps/portal/gov/odnr/buy-and-apply/hunting-fishing-boating/hunting-resources/ohio-landowner-hunter-access with your contact information. An OLHAP program representative will be in contact with you to provide more resources.

Rapid Increase in Ivermectin Prescriptions and Reports of Severe Illness Associated with Use of Products Containing Ivermectin to Prevent or Treat COVID-19

From Center for Disease Control (CDC – Press Release August 26, 2021)

Summary
Ivermectin is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescription medication used to treat certain infections caused by internal and external parasites. When used as prescribed for approved indications, it is generally safe and well-tolerated.During the COVID-19 pandemic, ivermectin dispensing by retail pharmacies has increased, as has the use of veterinary formulations available over the counter but not intended for human use. FDA has cautioned about the potential risks of use for prevention or treatment of COVID-19.

Ivermectin is not authorized or approved by FDA for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel has also determined that there are currently insufficient data to recommend ivermectin for treatment of COVID-19. ClinicalTrials.gov has listings of ongoing clinical trials that might provide more information about these hypothesized uses in the future. Continue reading

Safety Around Manure Pits

Tragedy struck a farm family in Mercer County when three brothers were killed after entering the manure storage on their dairy farm. This is an unimaginable loss and one that occurs way too often. It is hard to stand by and wait for help when a loved one is unconscious in a dangerous situation but we see time and again how entering to save them often leads to the death of another family member. Please be aware of all the dangers on your farm and inform your family and employees as well. To learn more about manure gasses, read this fact sheet.

Don’t Forget to Register for the Tri-State Precision Agriculture Conference

Join OSU Extension Henry County for the inaugural Tri-State Precision Agriculture Conference on August 11, 2021. Speakers will discuss current trends in tillage equipment, and equipment demonstrations will feature high-speed tillage, vertical tillage, strip tillage, and cover crop seeding systems. Fertilizer re-certification and CCA credits available.

When:  Wednesday, August 11, 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Continue reading

Take the Wheel – OSU Extension and Kenn-Feld Group to Host Women’s Tractor Safety and Operation Program on August 28

Learn how to safely operate agricultural equipment with OSU Extension and Kenn-Feld Group at their Women’s Tractor Safety and Operation Program. OSU Extension Educational Program Manager Lisa Pfeifer will demonstrate how to stay safe around agricultural equipment and identify equipment parts. Then take the driver’s seat and practice operating equipment thanks to our hosting dealership Kenn-Feld Group.

The Women’s Tractor Safety and Operation Program will be held on Saturday, August 28 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Kenn-Feld Group, 2772 US-6, Edgerton. The cost of the program is $10 per person and includes coffee and refreshments.

Women of all ages interested in learning how to operate compact to mid-size tractors in a supportive environment and network with other area women are encouraged to attend. Registration is required by August 23 and is limited to 20 participants. Register online at go.osu.edu/WmsCoTractorSafety or call Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator Stephanie Karhoff at 419-636-5608 for more information.

Tractor Safety Program Promotional Flyer Final

Take the OSU Extension Health Survey – Looking for Full and Part Time Farmers

  • Give us 15 minutes to tell us about your health behaviors for sun safety and 7 other areas: sleep, stress, nutrition, physical activity & a few more
  • We will not ask your name, or any other personal identifiers – your information will be aggregated with other farmer responses in Ohio
  • This information will develop future Extension programs and resources for healthy living.
  • There is a $10 gift card incentive for all completed surveys – for 100 Ohio farmers.
  • Go to our survey link directly:  www.go.osu.edu/HealthSurvey2020

For questions, contact:

Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family & Consumer Sciences, brinkman.93@osu.edu

Dee Jepsen, Ag Safety and Health, jepsen.4@osu.edu

Additional Information From ODA About The Mystery Seeds

Americans Receive Mystery Seeds in the Mail, Mostly From China - WSJPlease note: Paulding County has received various packets of seeds.  Please follow the directions below or contact Sarah at the Extension Office (419-399-8225) to arrange a drop off of the seeds.  

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is asking Ohioans to please send in unsolicited seeds.

After increasing reports of Ohio citizens receiving packages of unsolicited seeds in the mail, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is again urging the public to report and submit any unsolicited seed packets to ODA. In partnership with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Plant Protection and Quarantine Office, ODA is working to investigate the number of seed packets sent to Ohio, what type of seeds they are, and where they were mailed from. Continue reading

Recordings of Farm Office Live

One of the questions I have received this week is I can’t join the OSU Farm Office Live, where do I get these recordings.  Great News — You can view these recordings and also download the presenter slides at farmoffice.osu.edu/farmofficelive.

I have also included the webinars from April 6 to June 11 below.  Go to the link above to review today’s session. Continue reading

Navigating COVID-19 on the Farm – Best practices for Daily Management of Sanitation, Deliveries, Equipment Repairs, and People

by:  Lisa Pfeifer, Educational Program Manager, Agricultural Safety & Health & Dee Jepsen, Ph.D., Associate Professor and State Safety Program Leader, Agricultural Safety & Health

Click here for a PDF version of this article

Practices for limiting exposure and risks related to coronavirus.

While agriculture has been a part of the essential work that continues to hum with a focus on keeping our food supply chains open amid stay at home orders, it is important not to lose sight of the fact business, as usual, will demand course correction and new plans to keep family and employees safe, and farms operable and secure. Information changes quickly in the face of the unknowns of this pandemic, but one prediction that has remained stable is the timeline for a vaccine. It will be 12 to 18 months before a vaccine is available, necessitating plans to see farms through spring planting, summer, harvest, winter, and spring a second time. To delve into some ideas on how to navigate a normal workday on the farm in the face of a public health emergency and an economic crisis it will take thinking outside of the box and a commitment to change some rote behavior and practice. Continue reading