Summer Ag Events in NW Ohio

 

Hi all,

I wanted to share the upcoming events in NW Ohio Extension related to Agriculture to get those events on your calendar. Here is the link https://go.osu.edu/summernwohio22 or you can download the PDF of the newsletter 2022 Summer NW Ohio Newsletter PDF Version. I hope to see you at these summer events.

Why Should You Calibrate Your Sprayer Even If it has a Rate Controller?

By:  Erdal Ozkan

Whenever I give a presentation about the need to calibrate a sprayer and how to do it, there is always someone asking me this same question: “I have a rate controller in the cab that regulates the flow rate of the sprayer regardless of the changes in sprayer ground speed. I just enter the gallons per acre application rate, and the controller does the rest, just like cruise control in a car. So, should I still calibrate the sprayer? The answer is, Yes, a calibration should be done. Although the rate controllers do an excellent job of regulating the flow rate of nozzles to keep the application rate constant regardless of the changes in travel speed, a manual calibration at least once a year is needed for two reasons: 1) to ensure the rate controller is functioning properly, 2) the rate controller is not forced to operate outside the pressure operating range for the nozzles on the sprayer boom. Let me elaborate on both points I made and share with you the reasons why a manual calibration of a sprayer is a good idea.

  1. If you are stopped by a police officer for speeding, telling the police officer that the car was in cruise control set to the speed limit will not get you out of getting a ticket. Cruise controls go bad, and so will the rate controllers. That is why it is best to manually check the flow rate of nozzles to make sure the gallons per acre application rate you enter on the controller matches the gallons per acre rate provided by the nozzles.
  2. Your controller may be in good shape, but if the ground speed sensor is giving inaccurate data to the controller, it will not work accurately. For example, if the speed sensor works based on revolutions of the tractor wheels, the ground speed determined may not be accurate, because of the slippage that may occur under some ground conditions. Even the tire pressure being off just a few psi may change the tire revolutions per minute leading to erroneous travel speed readings. Continue reading

Ohio Farmers Invited to Participate in Multi-State On-Farm Research Survey

By:  Osler Ortez

Photo by Aaron Hird, USDA/NRCS

Photo by Aaron Hird, USDA/NRCS

A working group from The University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Kansas State University, and The Ohio State University have partnered to conduct a multi-state assessment of farmers’ approaches to on-farm research, including its importance and motives to participate.

Understanding farmers’ perceptions of on-farm research will be vital for the long-term success of initiatives that promote agronomic research on field scales. The information will also be critical in helping to shape future extension programming efforts. The survey will close on May 23rd and it is open for responses before that date. The survey is short, and it should take about 5-10 minutes to complete. Your information/responses are voluntary and will be recorded anonymously.

Access the survey here: https://kstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_71iwM5FE0zhSW10

Questions can be directed to:
Carlos Pires, carlospires@ksu.edu or 785-770-6335

Osler Ortez, ortez.5@osu.edu or 330-263-9725

We appreciate your time and participation! Sent on behalf of:

  • Carlos Pires, Ignacio Ciampitti, Charles Rice (K-State)
  • Fernanda Krupek, Gabriela Carmona (UNL)
  • Osler Ortez (Ohio State)

eFields Partnering with Growers to Evaluate Xyway™ Fungicide

By:  Sarah Noggle

Northern Corn Leaf Blight Symptoms

Northern Corn Leaf Blight Symptoms

Preventing significant yield losses from disease is likely on the forefront of growers’ minds following the 2021 growing season. A new product in our disease management toolbox is FMC’s fungicide Xyway™ LFR®. OSU Extension eFields program is partnering with growers to conduct on-farm trials evaluating the effect of an at-plant soil application of flutriafol (Xyway) on corn health and yield. Information from this trial will be used to improve corn disease management recommendations for growers throughout the state.

At each field site, an untreated control will be compared to plots treated with Xyway (applied in-furrow and/or 2×2). Additionally, growers also have the option to include a third treatment of Xyway (in-furrow/2×2) + VT/R1 Foliar Fungicide. For this study, a minimum of three replications is required, and four are preferred. Plots must also be randomized to eliminate bias due to plot order. Plots should be at least 500 feet long to ensure accurate yield monitor data.

If you are interested in hosting an on-farm trial, contact Paulding County ANR Extension Educator Sarah Noggle at 419-399-8225 or noggle.17@osu.edu or Rachel Cochran, Water Quality Extension Associate at cochran.474@osu.edu.

eFields is a program at The Ohio State University program dedicated to advancing production agriculture through field-scale research. To learn more visit digitalag.osu.edu.

WE WANT YOU… to bring us your on-farm research ideas

We want YOU! – Call for On-Farm Research Cooperators

Now is the time to start thinking about the questions you have surrounding your farming operation. What is the ideal seeding rate for corn or soybeans on my different soil types? What rate of Nitrogen will give me the best bang for my buck? Do I really need Phosphorus starter fertilizer? Will interseeding cover crops increase my late-season water-holding capacity of my soil? What is the health of my soil? The good news is that there is a simple way for you to answer these questions: on-farm research!

The Ohio State University Extension eFields Publication has 5 years of these types of trials published for you to see at https://digitalag.osu.edu/efields. The eFields program allows farmers just like you to get answers to the questions you have about your unique operation. What works for others may not be the best option for you, so let’s work together to find the correct answer.

If you’re interested in talking about an on-farm research trial for this Spring planting season, contact Paulding County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Sarah Noggle, or Water Quality Extension Associate, Rachel Cochran, to learn how we can help.

Need some more inspiration or ideas? Check out the 5th Anniversary 2021 eFields Publication at https://digitalag.osu.edu/efields.

 Contact us!

Paulding County Extension Office, 503 Fairground Drive, Paulding OH – 419-399-8225

Sarah Noggle, noggle.17@osu.edu, 567-344-5013

Rachel Cochran, cochran.474@osu.edu, 567-344-5016

New 5-Minute Agriculture Topic Video on Cover Crops

Check out the newest video in the 5-Minute Ag Topic Video Series, found on the Paulding County YouTube Channel. This video, centered on cover crops, features Water Quality Extension Associate, Rachel Cochran, and Agriculture & Natural Resources Extension Educator, Sarah Noggle, both from our Paulding County Extension Office. To learn more about benefits that cover crops can provide, as well as tools for selecting the best ones to fit your goals, click the embedded video above!

Filter the Kool-Aid before you Drink It!

 

Mid-Ohio Small Farm Conference – Sowing Seeds for Success

No need to feel alone in the field. Our new and small farm conferences provide connections that will last long after the event.

  • Do you own a few acres that you want to be productive but you’re not sure what to do?
  • Do you have a passion for farming and turning your piece of this wonderful earth into a food producing oasis?
  • Do you own land or forest that you’re not quite sure how to manage?
  • Do you raise or produce products that you would like to market and sell off your farm but you’re not sure how to make it successful?

If you’re asking yourself these questions, this conference is for you! Targeted to new and small farm owners, we cover topics like:

  • Horticulture
  • Produce Production
  • Natural Resources
  • Livestock
  • Specialty Crops
  • Farm Management
  • Marketing
  • Miscellaneous Topics

You’ll also have the opportunity to browse a trade show featuring the newest and most innovative ideas and services for your farming operation. Talk with the vendors and network with your peers. If you are a new or small farm owner, you don’t want to miss the 2022 Small Farm Conference – Sowing Seeds for Success on March 12th from 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the Mansfield OSU Campus in Ovalwood Hall.  The campus is just minutes from I-71 and US Rt 30.

Please visit: https://go.osu.edu/osufarmconference2022  for class and registration details or call OSU Extension Morrow County 419-947-1070.

Tri-County Soil Health Workshop to be Held March 18

Join Fulton and Williams Soil and Water Conservation Districts and Hillsdale Conservation District for a Tri-County Soil Health Workshop on Friday, March 18 at the Kissell Community Building, 509 N. Main Street, West Unity, OH. Presenters will include Rick Clark, a 5th generation farmer and 2022 National No-Till Conference presenter, and Dr. Aaron Wilson, Atmospheric Research Scientist with the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center and Climate Specialist with OSU Extension. The workshop will also feature a local farmer panel moderated by Rick Clark.

CCA credits include 3 Soil & Water Management CEUs and 1 Crop Management CEU. MAEAP Phase 1 and MI RUP Credits are also available. The workshop cost is $20, which includes lunch and refreshments. Registration is required by March 11 at either www.hillsdalecd.org or by submitting a completed registration form and payment to Williams SWCD, 11246 State Route 15, Montpelier, OH 43543.

Virtual Annie’s Project “Mitigating Risk Across Common Barrier’s” Webinar Sessions

In 2021, I had the opportunity to attend the national certification to become Annie’s program coordinator. Many people have not had a chance to hear about this program.  Let me share about the program and give you a few details of an upcoming FREE webinar series.

About Annie’s Project

Annie’s Project is an education program dedicated to strengthening women’s roles in modern farm and ranch enterprises. Launched in 2003 by University of Illinois Extension Educator Ruth Hambleton, Annie’s Project is a tribute to her mother, Annette Kohlhagen Fleck.

The program honors Annie’s entrepreneurship and her goal of raising a family and being an active partner in the family farm operation.

Farming is a complex business s and more farm women are becoming active business partners in their operations. The target audience is farm women with a passion for business and involvement. Participants will gain a better understanding of human resource issues, business plans, financial documentation, property titles, cash, and crops share leases, marketing pants, retirement, estate planning, and types of insurance.

“Our mission is to empower farm and ranch women to be better business partners through networks and by managing and organizing critical information.”

Annie’s Project – Education for Farm Women (APEFW) is an IRS-designated 501(c)(3) organization established for the purpose of providing education and other opportunities to woman farmers and ranchers so that these women can become effective owners and partners in farm businesses. Programs offered through APEFW are called Annie’s Projects. There are two level’s to Annie’s Project. For more information check out https://www.anniesproject.org/

Upcoming Programs

In March, we will be offering Annie’s Project Mitigating Risk Across Common Barriers to Profitability webinar series. This webinar series is free of charge. We invite you to attend! Attached is more information about the topics, dates, and times. There is a separate link for each Zoom session. Sessions are March 3, 10, 17, and 24.

See the official flyer for these programs Annie’s Webinar Flyer

Northeast Ohio Agronomy Breakfast Weekly Webinar Series – Starting February 23

The Ohio State Extension Offices of Northeast Ohio is excited to offer The Northeast Ohio Agronomy Breakfast – Weekly Webinar Series. Start the morning off right with a quick one-hour presentation each Wednesday starting on February 23, 2022. Each webinar will cover a different topic and offer time to ask questions to the speakers.

There is no cost to attend, and everyone is welcome to join. You can register easily online at Register at: https://u.osu.edu/neoab/ For any questions or for help with registration or zoom, contact Andrew Holden at the Ashtabula County Extension Office at 440-576-9008.

This series will feature a variety of experts on a variety of important agronomic topics, including grain bin fires and safety, farm drainage, corn leaf diseases, soybean disease, and 2022 weather outlooks!
Schedule:
❑ February 23rd, 9:00 AM – Peter Dahl speaking on Grain Bin And Dryer Fires
❑ March 2nd, 8:00 AM – Jason Hartschuh speaking on Corn Leaf Disease and Tire Pressure

❑ March 16th, 8:00 AM – Dr. Horacio Lopez-Nicora on Soybean Disease
❑ March 23rd, 8:30 AM –Dr. Vinayak S. Shedekar on Farm Drainage
❑ March 30th, 8:00 AM – Dr. Aaron Wilson on 2022 Weather Outlook
Register at: https://u.osu.edu/neoab/

Van Wert County hosting 3-Hour Initial Fertilizer Certification In-Person

Today, I learned that Van Wert County is holding a 3-hour initial Fertilizer Certification class for new applicators on February 10 from 6 – 9 pm. Please call the Van Wert office at 419-238-1214 to register or email Curtis Young at young.2@osu.edu.

Timely Frost Seeding Improves Pasture, Hay Stands!

Chris Penrose, Extension Educator, OSU Extension, Morgan County

If and when the seed can reach the soil in late winter while there is still freezing and thawing activity, clover can fill in bare spots and add to the density of the pasture stand.

In the past, as we’ve talked about the virtues of frost seeding, we’ve suggested it’s something that is best to occur in February or March during the period when the ground is freezing and thawing almost daily. In recent years freezing and thawing temperatures haven’t always happened after mid-February. Since it’s the freezing and thawing over time that gives frost seeding a great chance to work, the time for frost seeding may be upon us soon.

Frost seeding is a very low-cost, higher-risk way to establish new forages in existing fields by spreading seed over the field and letting the freezing and thawing action of the soil allow the seed to make “seed to soil” contact allowing it to successfully germinate. When you see soils “honeycombed” in the morning from a hard frost, or heaved up from a frost, seed that was spread on that soil has a great chance to make seed to soil contact when the soil thaws. I think the two biggest reasons why frost seeding fails is people wait too late to frost seed and the seed never makes good contact with the soil. I have heard some say that they like to “overseed” or just spread seed over an established stand. Let’s face it, if the seed does not land on the soil but on existing living or dead vegetation, it does not have a chance to successfully germinate: you need exposed soil. In light of the recent snow that’s arrived and/or expected throughout Ohio, it’s important to also note that frost seeding can be done over a thin layer of snow, however, it’s important to realize that rapid snowmelt can cause the seed to be washed away from where it’s needed. Continue reading

Ag Tech Tuesday

Join the Digital Ag Team as they dive into research results from around the state of Ohio based on the 2021 eFields report. Registration is free but required. Have you been enjoying the 2021 fields Report and are excited to learn more? Join us to learn more about the eFields program and the results we are seeing across the state.

The program will happen on Tuesday, February 1 and 8 from 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM. The format will be the same but due to participants registered different 2021 eFields reports may be discussed. CCA and CEUs will be offered.

Register at http://go.osu.edu/AgTechTues

Soybean Farmers Invited to Participate in Survey

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County & David Marrison, Extension Educator, ANR, Coshocton County

Dr. Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois, and Dr. Carl Zulauf, Emeritus Professor, The Ohio State University, are conducting an online survey of soybean growers in nine soybean-producing states, including Ohio. The nine states represent 75% of U.S. soybean production.

The researchers intend to measure the impact of each communication channel – mass media, social media, and interpersonal meetings – on farmers’ decision-making to adopt new digital technology. This survey is focused on soybean producers in these states: Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, and North Dakota. The results will support new research and contribute in a practical way to increase knowledge about the most efficient communication channels for the dissemination of digital agriculture technologies.

The survey takes approximately five minutes to complete, and all data will be kept confidential.  If interested, you can provide your email address to receive a copy of the final survey results.

If you are interested in participating in this survey, please click here: https://go.illinois.edu/farmdocsurvey

Allen County Ag Outlook and Agronomy Day

By Clint Schroeder

Join OSU Extension at the Allen County Fairgrounds, in Lima, Ohio, on Tuesday, February 8, 2022, starting at 9:00 a.m. for the Allen County Ag Outlook and Agronomy Day. The morning session will focus on commodity market outlook and ag policy. In the afternoon you will find answers to your agronomy questions, obtain pesticide applicator and fertilizer recertification credits, and CCA education hours as you prepare for the next growing season. The program will wrap up at 3:30 p.m.

Please RSVP by January 31, 2022, by contacting OSU Extension Allen County at 419-879-9108 or email Clint Schroeder at schroeder.307@osu.edu. The event will be held in the Youth Activities Building on the Allen County Fairgrounds, 2750 Harding Highway, Lima, OH 45804.

Doors open at 8:30 a.m; event starts at 9 a.m. Pre-registration by 1/31/2022 is required and the $15 admission can be paid at the door. The registration fee covers coffee and rolls, lunch, information packet, and education credits.

Shortage of Fungicides for Fruit Crop Growers

From Melanie Ivey, OARDC Plant Pathology

As with many other commodities, there is a shortage of fungicides (and herbicides), in particular Captan, for the beginning of the 2022 fruit crop season.  Since Captan is the backbone fungicide for many fruit crops growers will need to prepare a Plan B in case these two products do not arrive in time for the first early season sprays.  For apple, peach, cherry, grape, and blueberry, Captan can be replaced with Ziram.  A spreader/sticker can be added to Ziram to improve its efficacy.  I attached a copy of the Ziram 76DF Label.  The rates for Ziram are not the same as Captan so growers will need to refer to the label.  Remember the label is the law! For growers who have strawberries, they should consult the Midwest Fruit Pest Management Guide to select an alternative to Captan.

Growers should also anticipate a significant increase in prices for all fungicides. 🙁

Let’s hope we don’t have to move to Plan B and the products will arrive before the buds break!

New 5-Minute Ag Topic Video: Phosphorus

Click below to view the first video in our new 5-Minute Ag Topic video series, which we hope to release over the next few months. This first video topic is Phosphorus, where Water Quality Extension Associate Rachel Cochran discusses a quick overview of this essential plant nutrient. If you have any suggestions for future topics, please reach out to noggle.17@osu.edu or cochran.474@osu.edu.

Water Quality Extension Associates Planning Winter Meetings and Spring Research Need YOU!

The six water quality extension associates located in Northwest Ohio are gearing up for winter programming and need input from you! Continue reading

Farm Science Review Tickets Still Available until Monday

Picture courtesy of Farm Science Review

There is still time until Monday to get tickets. The 59th annual Farm Science Review is set for September 21-23 at Ohio State’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38, near London. The full program is located at https://fsr.osu.edu/sites/fsr/files/imce/Information/FSR%202021%20Full%20Program%20with%20Maps%20Gatefold.pdf 

Featured at the event will be more than 100 educational sessions, including “Ask the Expert” talks; 600 exhibits; the most comprehensive field crop demonstrations in the United States; a career exploration fair; and immersive virtual reality videos of agricultural activities.

This year’s Farm Science Review will also feature a new online component called “Farm Science Review Live.”

Hours for Farm Science Review are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 21–22 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 23.

Tickets are available at our office, $7 each. Either cash or check payable to OSU Extension Paulding County is accepted. Tickets are $10 at the gate. Ages 5 and under are free admittance. Currently, the Paulding County Office is back in our offices after our remodel. You will see a new facelift in the office. Please ask Katie for tickets.