Friday’s Escape to the Forest, August 7

From Kathy Smith

Join us Friday, August 7th for our live webinar on the Great Lakes Early Detection Network App.  Here is your opportunity to learn more about the app, how it is being used in Ohio, and how you can participate.

Help track invasive species using the Great Lakes Early Detection Network (GLEDN) App. Join Kathy Smith, Amy Stone, Marne Titchenell, and Eugene Braig, specialists in forestry, horticulture, wildlife, and aquatic ecology as they share how to use the app to report invasive species.

Register here: go.osu.edu/glednwebinar

Don’t miss out on the Paulding County Twilight Field Day next Tuesday, August 4

Field to Lake – Twilight Open House – Country Evening, Old Sights, New Eyes

The Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District is working in collaboration with Ohio State University Extension of Paulding County and the Conservation Action Project (CAP) to bring you the Field to Lake – Twilight Open House. This program will feature water control drainage structures and provide opportunities to connect with farmers and professionals to learn more about them. Additionally, explore soil health displays, a drainage water management structure model, and learn about available funding for these structures for those that qualify. The Open House will be held on August 4th, 2020, from 6:00-8:00 pm, in the field, across from 22348 Road 178, Oakwood, OH, 45873. Stop in for 15 minutes or stay the full two hours. There will be an option to drive down the lane and observe the drainage control structures while staying in your vehicle if that is more comfortable for participants.

8.5 x 11 Poster Drainage Field Day

Why consider a drainage water management structure? “This new approach to managing drainage is a significant break from the old way of draining excess water from fields, specifically in the Upper Midwest, where tile drainage systems are most common,” says Leonard Binstock, drainage consultant and executive director of the Agriculture Drainage Management Coalition. According to the Natural Resource Conservation Service, these structures can provide both water quality improvement and production benefits. Water quality benefits are derived by minimizing unnecessary tile drainage, reducing the amount of nitrate that leaves farm fields. Controlled drainage systems can also retain water in field areas that could be used for crop production later in the season.

RSVP is requested, but not required- use the QR code or email address below. With the assistance of The Nature Conservancy, there will be a virtual option available after the event for those who can’t attend in person. Information to access the virtual event will be shared on the supporting organizations’ Facebook pages or by registering for the event and choosing the virtual option. Please note that social distancing will be observed at this outdoor event.

Page Drainage Field Day Invite,

Tri Fold Field to Lake Drainage

For more information, contact: Anna Gurney or Patrick Troyer, Paulding Soil & Water Conservation District, 419-399-4771, Paulding@PauldingSWCD.org

SWCD VRT Lunch and Learn

From Patrick Troyer, Paulding SWCD

Paulding SWCD, Putnam SWCD, and The Nature Conservancy will take part in a virtual Lunch & Learn next, Thursday, June 25th from 12-12:30pm. This will cover how you can sign up for the subsurface nutrient application program offered by Paulding & Putnam County. Attached is a flyer with a link to join the session. It will also be able to be viewed live on our Facebook Page www.facebook.com/PauldingSWCD .

VRT lunch and learn Flyer

Message from The Nature Conservancy about a New Program for the Maumee Valley Watershed

From The Nature Conservancy Newsletter
We are looking for a diverse group of farmers; large acreage, small acreage, corn and soy, small grains, livestock, new and experienced who are willing to be trained to reach out and share their knowledge with other farmers.  “This is an opportunity for farmers to take the knowledge they’ve gained on their own farm and make an impact in a larger area.  We want people (farmers) who realize the importance of soil health goes beyond their own farms and who want to see farming be successful.  The future of farming depends on soil health,”  said Stephanie Singer, outreach education specialist at the Western Lake Erie Basin Project Office.  If you are interested in being part of this exciting farmer-led outreach project please complete the online Farmer Advocate for Conservation Application, Click Here!

Continue reading

H2Ohio Deadline For Accepting Applications Moved Back to March 31

Taken from Ohio Department of Agriculture and Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District

The deadline for farmers to submit applications for the H2Ohio program is moving back to the original date of March 31, 2020.

Governor DeWine strongly believes in the H2Ohio water quality initiative and farmers have shown overwhelming interest to implement the program’s best practices.  Our state and nation are facing an unprecedented economic crisis as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.  In an effort to preserve resources for H2Ohio, ODA is suspending the acceptance of new applications after March 31 but will continue to process all current applications.

ODA recently extended the deadline to accommodate workflow changes due to COVID-19 and ensure all applications could be processed electronically or via telecommunications.  The work transition has gone smoothly and all remaining applications will be handled similarly within the original timeline.

Further information regarding the H2Ohio program will be forthcoming.  Updates will be posted to this website and distributed through the Soil and Water Conservation Districts.  For a complete list of SWCD offices, go to http://h2.ohio.gov/agriculture/.

Additionally, information from the Paulding SWCD

Phone number to office 419-399-4771.  Link to the website for H2Ohio information http://www.pauldingswcd.org/technical-programs/h2ohio/

Meetings Planned for Farmers to Apply for H2Ohio Funds

$30 Million Available for Farmers Through Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio Plan

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda announced today that $30 million in H2Ohio funding will be available for Ohio farmers in more than a dozen counties beginning next month. The funds will be awarded as part of Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio plan to reduce agricultural phosphorus runoff and prevent algal blooms in Lake Erie.

“Since announcing the details of my H2Ohio plan in November, we’ve had a great deal of interest from farmers in the Maumee River Watershed who want to do their part to improve the health of Lake Erie,” said Governor DeWine. “H2Ohio will provide farm-by-farm support to help farmers minimize phosphorus runoff while increasing profit over the long-run.”

H2OhioFarmers living in the following 14 northwest Ohio counties will be eligible to apply for funds at their local Soil and Water Conservation Districts starting on February 1, 2020: Allen, Auglaize, Defiance, Fulton, Hancock, Hardin, Henry, Lucas, Mercer, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert, Williams, and Wood.

H2Ohio will fund investments in 10scientifically proven interventions to reduce nutrient runoff from agriculture, which is the primary cause for algal blooms in Lake Erie and elsewhere. Algal blooms can threaten drinking water and impact the health of both people and animals. Continue reading