NW Ohio Agronomy Day

Join Henry County Extension at their NW Ohio Agronomy Day at the Bavarian Haus in Deshler, OH on Wednesday, February 7 from 8:00 AM until 3 PM.  If you plan to attend, please take a moment, and register on the registration link.  CCA, Commercial, and Private Pesticide Credits will be available. Speakers will include Bruce Clevenger (Economics of Drainage), Dr. Vinayak Shedekar (Drainage Water Recycling), Alan Leininger (Spray Drones), Michael Staton (Management of White Mold in Soybeans), Greg Labarge (Fertilizer Management). Additionally, if you need fertilizer or pesticide credits the day will continue from 3:00 – 4:00 PM.

See the official agenda here

 

Farm Science Review is just around the corner!

LONDON, Ohio – More than 50 companies will join the ranks as exhibitors for the 61st Farm Science Review Sept. 19-21 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center. The new exhibitors represent various sectors in the agriculture industry including livestock handling, equipment advancements, agronomic technology, agricultural policy, and more.

Paulding County Extension Office has tickets for sale at a discounted price total of $10 per ticket. Tickets will be for sale until Monday, September 18 at noon. Continue reading Farm Science Review is just around the corner!

Bio and Renewable Diesel Energy What the Future Holds Webinar

The OSU Extension Energy Outreach team will put on a program on renewable diesel energy on Sep 26, in lieu of our monthly meeting.  Please see the attached flyer for the link.

Join speakers from Ohio State University Extension, Clean Fuels Alliance America, Benchmark Biodiesel, and the Ohio Soybean Council to learn more about current trends in the soybean biodiesel market. Questions- Email: Dan Lima: lima.19@osu.edu or Gwynn Stewart: stewart.1818@osu.edu

DATE: Sept. 26, 2023

TIME:10:00 a.m.- 11:30 a.m.

To register: https://go.osu.edu/biodiesel

The virtual panel will include:

  1. Kirk Merritt from the Ohio Soybean Council
  2. Tom Verry from Clean Fuels Alliance America (formerly the National Biodiesel Association)
  3. Seungki Lee from OSU College of Food Agriculture and Environmental Science (Ag Economist)
  4. Page Tohorson from Benchmark Biodiesel- Private sector

The goal is to introduce the Bio/Renewable diesel market to the public/farmer.  We hope to highlight the market potential of this fuel for not only the public but the soybean producer as well.

Sincerely,

The OSU Extension Energy Outreach Team

Soybean Diseases Are Showing Up in Ohio

By: Horacio Lopez-Nicora, Stephanie Karhoff, CCA

Source: https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-28/soybean-diseases-are-showing-ohio
In early August, we recommended starting scouting fields for soybean diseases. At that time (two weeks ago), disease incidence across Ohio was very low to moderate. Conducive environmental conditions, however, are turning things around and more fields are developing disease symptoms.

Figure 1. Soybean field in southern Ohio are severely affected by sudden death syndrome (SDS) with premature defoliation in the R5/R6 growth stage (A); symptoms begin with interveinal yellowing (chlorosis) of a leaf (B); eventually, leaf tissue dies and becomes brown but veins remain green (C). The fungus infects the root and produces toxins that are responsible for the above-ground symptoms.

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)

We are finding fields in Ohio severely affected by sudden death syndrome (SDS) [Fig.1 and Fig. 2]. SDS is caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. This species is the most prevalent in the region, however, other Fusarium species can cause SDS. SDS above-ground symptoms can be confused with those produced by a different fungus (Cadophora gregata) that causes brown stem rot (BSR). To distinguish SDS from BSR, symptomatic plants should be dug out and stem cut open longitudinally. SDS-infected plants have white, healthy-looking pith, while BSR-infected plants present brown discoloration of the pith. Moreover, fields with severe SDS symptoms can also have high levels of soybean cyst nematode (SCN). Visit here for more information on SDS.

Continue reading Soybean Diseases Are Showing Up in Ohio

Summer Ag Events in NW Ohio

 

Hi all,

I wanted to share the upcoming events in NW Ohio Extension related to Agriculture to get those events on your calendar. Here is the link https://go.osu.edu/summernwohio22 or you can download the PDF of the newsletter 2022 Summer NW Ohio Newsletter PDF Version. I hope to see you at these summer events.

Ag Tech Tuesday

Join the Digital Ag Team as they dive into research results from around the state of Ohio based on the 2021 eFields report. Registration is free but required. Have you been enjoying the 2021 fields Report and are excited to learn more? Join us to learn more about the eFields program and the results we are seeing across the state.

The program will happen on Tuesday, February 1 and 8 from 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM. The format will be the same but due to participants registered different 2021 eFields reports may be discussed. CCA and CEUs will be offered.

Register at http://go.osu.edu/AgTechTues

Virtual Corn College and Soybean School

Due to popular demand, the AgCrops Team will host the 2nd annual virtual Corn College and Soybean School on February 15, 2022, from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM featuring your OSU Extension state specialists, including the new corn agronomist, Dr. Osler Ortez, and new soybean pathologist, Dr. Horacio Lopez-Nicora. CCA CEUs will be available during the live presentations. The cost of the program is $10. To register go to go.osu.edu/cornsoy. A zoom link will be sent after registering for the webinar. For more information contact, Laura Lindsey at 614-292-9080 or email her at lindsey.233@osu.edu.

2022 Corn College Soy School flyer.

Soybean Farmers Invited to Participate in Survey

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County & David Marrison, Extension Educator, ANR, Coshocton County

Dr. Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois, and Dr. Carl Zulauf, Emeritus Professor, The Ohio State University, are conducting an online survey of soybean growers in nine soybean-producing states, including Ohio. The nine states represent 75% of U.S. soybean production.

The researchers intend to measure the impact of each communication channel – mass media, social media, and interpersonal meetings – on farmers’ decision-making to adopt new digital technology. This survey is focused on soybean producers in these states: Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, and North Dakota. The results will support new research and contribute in a practical way to increase knowledge about the most efficient communication channels for the dissemination of digital agriculture technologies.

The survey takes approximately five minutes to complete, and all data will be kept confidential.  If interested, you can provide your email address to receive a copy of the final survey results.

If you are interested in participating in this survey, please click here: https://go.illinois.edu/farmdocsurvey

Double Crop Forages to Maximize Summer Forage Potential

By Jason Hartschuh, OSU Extension Educator, Crawford County

Many producers use summer annual forages for grazing and stored forage to either fill the summer slump or keep livestock feed through the winter. With wheat harvest finalized across most of the state and straw baling completed for many now our attention turns to creating a second or third profit center off those wheat acres.

Wheat acres provide an excellent opportunity for double cropping with forages that when harvested at the proper growth stage can either make high-quality late gestation early lactation forage, grazing opportunities, or gut fill to mix lower the quality of other forages or concentrates.

Many species of summer annuals can be utilized for forage. Some of them such as radish and turnip can be easily grazed but do not make well-stored forage as Baleage or dry hay. For dry hay, we have found the best two species to be teff and oats. Most other species can be harvested as silage or Baleage. Be cautious making dry hay that for plant stem is truly dry. Continue reading Double Crop Forages to Maximize Summer Forage Potential

Purdue Corn and Soybean Monthly Outlook Webinar on Friday, May 14 – 12:30 – 1:30 PM

Register Now

Upcoming Webinar

MAY CORN & SOYBEAN OUTLOOK UPDATE WEBINAR

Time: 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EDT

Date: Friday, May 14, 2021

Join us for our free monthly corn and soybean outlook webinar series

Purdue ag economists Michael Langemeier, Nathanael Thompson, and James Mintert will host a free Corn and Soybean Outlook monthly webinar series for the remainder of 2021. Each webinar will follow the release of that month’s U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports. Continue reading Purdue Corn and Soybean Monthly Outlook Webinar on Friday, May 14 – 12:30 – 1:30 PM

Science for Success: Answering Soybean Questions

With funding from United Soybean Board, soybean agronomists across the U.S. are hosting a ‘Notes from the Field’ webinar series the first Friday of each month beginning May 7. Join research and extension specialists from Land Grant institutions for a monthly informal discussion on production topics of timely relevance. Bring your questions!

When:  May 7, June 4, July 9, and August 6 at 9:00 AM eastern time

Want to plug in:  Register to attend (via Zoom) for each monthly session and you will receive Zoom login information. Register at:
https://ncsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEkdeiqrTIqHNMYI3FuXRVPgsC87mavL6hs

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Lindsey (lindsey.233@osu.edu or 614-292-9080).

Livestock and Grain Producers: Dealing with Vomitoxin and Zearalenone

Vomitoxin in the 2020 corn crop continues to plague both livestock and grain producers. Livestock producers are trying to decide how best to manage corn and corn by-products with high levels of vomitoxin, and those who grow corn are trying to decide how best to avoid vomitoxin contamination in 2021.

In the 15 minute video below, OSU Extension Educations John Barker, Rob Leeds, and Jacci Smith discuss where and why this year’s vomitoxin issues originated, considerations for avoiding problems in coming years, how it impacts livestock, and what’s involved in testing grain for vomitoxin.

Projected Returns for 2021 – Increasing Fertilizer Prices May Force Tough Decisions

From Barry Ward and John Barker

The profit margin outlook for corn, soybeans, and wheat is relatively positive as planting season approaches. Prices of all three of our main commodity crops have moved higher since last summer and forward prices for this fall are currently at levels high enough to project positive returns for 2021 crop production. Recent increases in fertilizer prices have negatively affected projected returns. Higher crop insurance costs, as well as moderately higher energy costs relative to last year, will also add to overall costs for 2021.

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be modestly higher compared to last year with higher fertilizer, fuel, and crop insurance expenses. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2021 are projected to range from $386 to $470 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2021 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $216 to $242 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2021 are projected to range from $166 to $198 per acre. Continue reading Projected Returns for 2021 – Increasing Fertilizer Prices May Force Tough Decisions

Did you miss out on our Ohio State University Corn or Soybean College?

Did you miss out on the Ohio State University Extension Corn or Soybean College on February 11th? We have an opportunity for you to rewatch the recordings.  The recordings are broken down into topics and smaller sections. If you are having any problems viewing, please reach out to me.

The recorded presentations up on our Ohio State Ag Crops YouTube Channel:

Pierce Paul summarized the Q&A portion of his session in the Corn Newsletter last week. You can access that summary here.

Pre-harvest Herbicide Treatments

Velvetleaf in a Soybean Field

Information on preharvest herbicide treatments for field corn and soybeans can be found in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois”, at the end of these crop sections (pages 72 and 143 of the 2020 edition).  Products listed for corn include Aim, glyphosate, and paraquat, and for soybeans include Aim, paraquat, glyphosate, and Sharpen.  Some dicamba products are also approved for preharvest use in soybeans, and some 2,4-D products are approved for use in corn, and these are not listed in the guide.  The basic information for these follows:

Dicamba – soybeans:  Apply 8 – 32 oz/A (4 lb/gal products) as a broadcast or spot treatment after soybean pods have reached mature brown color and at least 75% leaf drop has occurred; soybeans may be harvested 14 days or more after a pre-harvest application; do not use preharvest-treated soybean for seed unless a germination test is performed on the seed with an acceptable result of 95% germination or better; do not feed soybean fodder or hay following a preharvest application of this product. Continue reading Pre-harvest Herbicide Treatments

How to Identify Late Season Soybean Diseases in 2020

By Anne Dorrance

Sclerotinia stem rot – The nights have been cool this growing season, even when the days were very warm. The fog this morning in Wayne County reminded me that this is the time of the year to begin to scout for this stem disease.  Sclerotinia is caused by a fungus that survives from season to season and over several years from sclerotia.  The infections actually occurred during flowering when the canopy was closed, and cool nights can really enhance and favor this disease.  For this disease, disease levels can reach 20% incidence before there is a measurable yield loss.  Sclerotinia will occur as single plants or a small patch of dying plants, that wilt and turn a deeper olive green color. Look at the stem and white fluffy growth will appear on the stem, this is the sign of the fungus.

Sclerotinia Stem Rot

Sclerotinia Stem Rot

Sudden Death Syndrome – reports that this disease is also beginning to develop in some areas of the state where soybeans are reaching R6. Symptoms include irregular yellow spots, which turn brown or necrotic between the veins.  Interestingly the veins are surrounded by green.  The center of the stem or pith is bright white in this disease.  This is a fungal pathogen and infections most likely occurred shortly after planting and this fungus causes extensive root rots.  The figure has both susceptible and resistant cultivar.  There is a look-alike symptom caused by triazole fungicides when applied under hot conditions.  To separate these two, if a triazole had been sprayed, look at the roots.  The roots will be very healthy where SDS, the roots, and the center of the taproot are discolored. Continue reading How to Identify Late Season Soybean Diseases in 2020

The Ohio Crop Tour Goes Virtual

This article originally appeared in Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ohio Ag Net and Ohio’s Country Journal crop tour is moving to a virtual experience for 2020! We are inviting growers from across Ohio to send in their yield data using the form below. This data will be posted completely anonymously, however, we are asking you to enter your contact information to be eligible for a drawing for a $500 gift card to Rural King. Each field entry is another entry for the drawing.

Worksheets

Print our handy worksheets to help you with your calculations and to take notes in the field! You are free to make as many copies as you would like.

Click to download the corn worksheet.

Click to download the soybean worksheet.

Click to submit your data.

New Crop Staging Videos

A new suite of crop staging videos has been built by faculty at The Ohio State University that highlight corn, soybean, and alfalfa. The videos highlight some common staging methods for each crop and connect the staging guidelines to practice using live plants in the field. The videos can be found in the “Crop Growth Stages” playlist on the AgCrops YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbqpb60QXN3UJIBa5is6kHw/playlists. These compliment some of the wheat staging videos previously posted on the AgCrops YouTube channel as well. As the crops progress through the reproductive stages, expect some more videos to be posted! Continue reading New Crop Staging Videos

Lookout for Spider Mites

Soybean leaves showing speckling.

With continued dry weather, spider mites are one of the main pests to remain vigilant about in field crops.  They will often show up in field borders first as they move in from other habitats, for example, if nearby ditches have been mowed.  Spider mites are difficult to see.  Look for injury signs — yellow spotting or stippling on the upper side of leaves.  In soybeans, this damage usually begins in the lower canopy and progresses upward as the mite population increases.  Heavily infested leaves may also have light webbing similar to spider webs. Continue reading Lookout for Spider Mites