Farm Science Review Tickets Still Available until Monday

Picture courtesy of Farm Science Review

There is still time until Monday to get tickets. The 59th annual Farm Science Review is set for September 21-23 at Ohio State’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38, near London. The full program is located at https://fsr.osu.edu/sites/fsr/files/imce/Information/FSR%202021%20Full%20Program%20with%20Maps%20Gatefold.pdf 

Featured at the event will be more than 100 educational sessions, including “Ask the Expert” talks; 600 exhibits; the most comprehensive field crop demonstrations in the United States; a career exploration fair; and immersive virtual reality videos of agricultural activities.

This year’s Farm Science Review will also feature a new online component called “Farm Science Review Live.”

Hours for Farm Science Review are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 21–22 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 23.

Tickets are available at our office, $7 each. Either cash or check payable to OSU Extension Paulding County is accepted. Tickets are $10 at the gate. Ages 5 and under are free admittance. Currently, the Paulding County Office is back in our offices after our remodel. You will see a new facelift in the office. Please ask Katie for tickets.

Fall armyworms are marching

Fall armyworm damage to a yard in Paulding County. If you are seeing this please contact me. There is a chance the yard will come back with the rains received on Thursday evening.

I have received many phone calls and emails this week about armyworms this week from both farmers and landowners.  I have worked with Curtis Young in Van Wert County to make the positive ID of Fall armyworm.  I have shared some of the pictures of the damage armyworms can do.  I am receiving these calls from around the county.

Fall armyworm in a lawn in Paulding County. The threshold for control is 4 worms per square foot for lawns/homeowners.

Across the US, the Fall armyworm numbers have been much higher than in previous years due to our current weather patterns and the life cycle of Armyworms, there is a chance we could see a third-generation yet this year.  These guys like to feed on the species in the grass family and their “candy” is newly seeded yards (within the last few years), volunteer wheat fields, and newly seeded forages. Additionally, I am linking extra articles with information on control and general question both agronomically and for homeowners. As always, contact me with your questions.

Thanks,

Bagworm Eggs are Hatching: The Game’s Afoot!

Authors Joe Boggs
Published on
bagworm

Overwintered common bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) eggs are hatching in southwest Ohio.  The 1st instar caterpillars are very small with their bags measuring around 1/8″ in length.

Bagworm

The tiny 1st instar bags are constructed with pieces of tan to reddish-brown sawdust-like frass (excrement) stuck to the outside of silk and look like “dunce caps.”  As the caterpillars mature, they begin weaving host plant debris into the silk which provides structural stability and helps to camouflage the caterpillar bag-abodes. Continue reading

Box Tree Moth Alert

Box Tree Moth

Boxwoods (Buxus spp.) are some of the most common plants found in Ohio landscapes and they remain a mainstay of our nursery industry.  Box Tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis) caterpillars defoliate boxwoods and will strip bark once they run out of leaves to eat.  The moth has multiple generations per year, depending on geographical locations, and sustained high populations are capable of killing boxwoods.

Continue reading

SOLAR ELECTRIC ECONOMIC ANALYSIS WEBINAR SERIES

SOLAR ELECTRIC ECONOMIC ANALYSIS WEBINAR SERIES

Cost: Free, Supported by North Central Region SARE

Registration 

SARE Webinar Brochure 2021 – final

Our SARE PDP grant is coming to an end. We invite you to join us for our last webinar to learn about the economics and feasibility of solar electric systems for farms, residences, and businesses.

 Who should attend:

  • People who work with farmers and citizens interested in solar; Extension Educators, Rural Bankers, Ag service providers, USDA, State government.
  • If you have attended our webinar series before this will be a review, if not this is a great opportunity to learn about solar applications on farms.

Continue reading

Additional Information From ODA About The Mystery Seeds

Americans Receive Mystery Seeds in the Mail, Mostly From China - WSJPlease note: Paulding County has received various packets of seeds.  Please follow the directions below or contact Sarah at the Extension Office (419-399-8225) to arrange a drop off of the seeds.  

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is asking Ohioans to please send in unsolicited seeds.

After increasing reports of Ohio citizens receiving packages of unsolicited seeds in the mail, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is again urging the public to report and submit any unsolicited seed packets to ODA. In partnership with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Plant Protection and Quarantine Office, ODA is working to investigate the number of seed packets sent to Ohio, what type of seeds they are, and where they were mailed from. Continue reading

Tree and Wood Harvesting in the Area

From John Mueller, District Manager, Division of Forestry – Findlay

As our economy changes and reshoring from foreign countries takes place, there are some disruptions in the wood supply.  This is leading to mid-west wood and wood box suppliers looking for alternative supply sources.  We have received letters in the county from these suppliers looking to come directly to your wooded property and provide you a quote to purchase your trees with a commitment on the spot. Please know that you DO NOT have to commit at that time and you can receive help and advice on this if you prefer.  There is competition for your wood and perhaps you could get a better price.

Comment from Sarah – Believe it or not, we have a division of Ohio Forestry over Paulding County.  They will be a neutral party in any discussions and make sure that you are not being taken advantage of in these critical decisions. If this is a topic that you would like education on, I would be willing to set up a virtual informational countywide meeting. 

Reach out to

John Mueller, District Manager– Division of Forestry- Findlay, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, 952 Lima Avenue, Findlay, OH 45840, Office Number: 419-424-5004, John.Mueller@dnr.state.oh.us,

forestry.ohiodnr.gov

Friday’s Escape to the Forest, August 7

From Kathy Smith

Join us Friday, August 7th for our live webinar on the Great Lakes Early Detection Network App.  Here is your opportunity to learn more about the app, how it is being used in Ohio, and how you can participate.

Help track invasive species using the Great Lakes Early Detection Network (GLEDN) App. Join Kathy Smith, Amy Stone, Marne Titchenell, and Eugene Braig, specialists in forestry, horticulture, wildlife, and aquatic ecology as they share how to use the app to report invasive species.

Register here: go.osu.edu/glednwebinar

CAUV Calculation- Where do I go to find more information? – Tax Value of Farmland Expected to Drop

Today on the OSU Farm Office Live, there was a great discussion about CAUV. This information is very helpful for any landowner in Paulding County.  You can listen to the recorded session at farmoffice.osu.edu/farmofficelive

Check out this website for more information: https://www.robertdinterman.com/CAUV/

Additionally, I am adding the most recent article from Robert Dinterman.

Tax Value of Farmland Expected to Drop

There’s a bit of good news for Ohio farmers to counter the bad news caused by COVID-19, as well as by last year’s historic rain. In counties scheduled for property value updates in 2020—about half of Ohio’s 88 counties—the average value of farmland enrolled in the Current Agricultural Use Value (CAUV) program should be about 40% lower than 2017–2019, or about $665 per acre. Continue reading

Septic System Care and Maintenance

Cleaning effluent filter with soap and brush

Karen Mancl, Professor, Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering
Brian Slater, Associate Professor, Environment and Natural Resources

 

Homes beyond the reach of a city sewer must treat and disperse wastewater on their lots. This household sewage treatment system requires regular care and maintenance just like other components of a home. A neglected system threatens public health and can result in financial losses to the property. In cities, a trained professional operator cares for the wastewater treatment system. For homes with household sewage treatment systems, the property owner is responsible for maintenance.

Household sewage treatment systems usually consist of a septic tank, a treatment system, and a dispersal system. The expected life of a properly maintained wastewater treatment system is around 20 years.  To continue reading this factsheet click here