Using Soil Tests Phosphorus Results to Identify Agronomic and Conservation Needs

What is a soil test? | Dreamlawns Lawn Care“What are the right decisions for phosphorus management in crop production that reduce water quality impacts?” is a common question I have from farmers looking to improve yield yet are concerned about downstream water quality impacts of phosphorus.

A representative agronomic soil test has long been an essential tool for sound agronomic nutrient management decisions. That same agronomic test result can be a useful indicator for identifying fields where additional conservation practices might improve water quality. Fields with Soil Test Phosphorus (STP) levels two to three times higher than the agronomic need result in increased phosphorus losses measured on the edge of field water quality monitoring.

As soil test results are reviewed this fall, consider keeping a list of fields in three categories based on STP levels that define the risk of yield loss for the corn/soybean rotation and risk of increased water quality impacts.

  1. Less than 20 PPM Mehlich 3 STP (or 30 PPM if wheat/alfalfa in the rotation)
  2. Between 20-40 PPM (or 30-50 PPM if wheat/alfalfa are in the rotation)
  3. Greater than 50 PPM

Continue reading

Herbicide Residue Considerations for Fall Cover Crop Establishment

Cover Crops in Corn Stalks

Article from CORN Newsletter on September 1, 2020 – By Mark Loux and Alyssa Essman, OSU

Herbicides with a residual that is used in corn and soybeans can affect the establishment of fall-planted cover crops and should be taken into account when planning cover crop practices and selecting species. Soil characteristics and weather also play a role in the persistence of residual herbicides, which can vary by field and year. More information is needed on rotational intervals for many cover crop species, and this information is often not included on herbicide labels. University weed scientists have studied the effect of residual herbicides on some of the most popular cover crop species in order to provide this information to growers. In general, residual herbicides that control grass weeds can hinder the establishment of grass cover crop species. Broadleaf cover crop species are most impacted by group 2 (ALS inhibitors), 5 (PSII inhibitors), 14 (PPO inhibitors), and 27 (HPPD inhibitors) herbicides (Purdue University). Continue reading

Don’t miss out on the Paulding County Twilight Field Day next Tuesday, August 4

Field to Lake – Twilight Open House – Country Evening, Old Sights, New Eyes

The Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District is working in collaboration with Ohio State University Extension of Paulding County and the Conservation Action Project (CAP) to bring you the Field to Lake – Twilight Open House. This program will feature water control drainage structures and provide opportunities to connect with farmers and professionals to learn more about them. Additionally, explore soil health displays, a drainage water management structure model, and learn about available funding for these structures for those that qualify. The Open House will be held on August 4th, 2020, from 6:00-8:00 pm, in the field, across from 22348 Road 178, Oakwood, OH, 45873. Stop in for 15 minutes or stay the full two hours. There will be an option to drive down the lane and observe the drainage control structures while staying in your vehicle if that is more comfortable for participants.

8.5 x 11 Poster Drainage Field Day

Why consider a drainage water management structure? “This new approach to managing drainage is a significant break from the old way of draining excess water from fields, specifically in the Upper Midwest, where tile drainage systems are most common,” says Leonard Binstock, drainage consultant and executive director of the Agriculture Drainage Management Coalition. According to the Natural Resource Conservation Service, these structures can provide both water quality improvement and production benefits. Water quality benefits are derived by minimizing unnecessary tile drainage, reducing the amount of nitrate that leaves farm fields. Controlled drainage systems can also retain water in field areas that could be used for crop production later in the season.

RSVP is requested, but not required- use the QR code or email address below. With the assistance of The Nature Conservancy, there will be a virtual option available after the event for those who can’t attend in person. Information to access the virtual event will be shared on the supporting organizations’ Facebook pages or by registering for the event and choosing the virtual option. Please note that social distancing will be observed at this outdoor event.

Page Drainage Field Day Invite,

Tri Fold Field to Lake Drainage

For more information, contact: Anna Gurney or Patrick Troyer, Paulding Soil & Water Conservation District, 419-399-4771, Paulding@PauldingSWCD.org

New Program from Paulding SWCD

The Paulding Soil & Water Conservation District is pleased to announce the launch of a new cost-share program called the Lower Auglaize Nutrient & Sediment Reduction Program (NSRP) for producers in Paulding County. Funding is limited in this program so be sure to contact me as soon as possible. Check below for program details. Continue reading

Interested in Soil Health? Learn together with OSU Extension

Improving soil health (SH) can provide a variety of benefits including improved water infiltration, increased water holding capacity, and increased nutrient availability. However, it can be challenging to quantify these benefits in the field.

In 2020, the eFields program is kicking off an effort to help better understand how management practices influence soil health and ultimately water quality. OSU Extension has worked to identify a few soil tests that can provide helpful indicators of improved soil health. Though several health tests exist, we focused on tests that are simple, economical, and repeatable. We are looking for farmers interested in soil health and who want to participate in a statewide field survey collecting soil health data from fields under various management practices, specifically conventional tillage, no-till, organic nutrient management, and cover cropping. The results from this effort will be used to guide recommendations for improving soil health on Ohio farms. Soil health indicators are also being added to selected eFields trials including nitrogen rate and manure sidedress.

If you are interested in learning more about participating in eFields trials focused on soil health, reach out to your local Extension educator or email digitalag@osu.edu. For more information about the soil health indicators and how to use them, visit: go.osu.edu/MeasureSH.

Soil Health Digital Cafe Series

The Soil Health Nexus is hosting a series of informal soil health webinars featuring Extension soil health experts and researchers from across the region discussing the latest soil health research, resources, and news. The webinars will take place weekly starting Wednesday, April 29 at 2 pm CT. They will be an hour in length with a 20-minute presentation, followed by 10-minutes of Q&A and then a casual 30-minute Digital Cafe where attendees can continue to discuss the topic in more depth with Soil Health Nexus members. Continue reading

H2Ohio Deadline For Accepting Applications Moved Back to March 31

Taken from Ohio Department of Agriculture and Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District

The deadline for farmers to submit applications for the H2Ohio program is moving back to the original date of March 31, 2020.

Governor DeWine strongly believes in the H2Ohio water quality initiative and farmers have shown overwhelming interest to implement the program’s best practices.  Our state and nation are facing an unprecedented economic crisis as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.  In an effort to preserve resources for H2Ohio, ODA is suspending the acceptance of new applications after March 31 but will continue to process all current applications.

ODA recently extended the deadline to accommodate workflow changes due to COVID-19 and ensure all applications could be processed electronically or via telecommunications.  The work transition has gone smoothly and all remaining applications will be handled similarly within the original timeline.

Further information regarding the H2Ohio program will be forthcoming.  Updates will be posted to this website and distributed through the Soil and Water Conservation Districts.  For a complete list of SWCD offices, go to http://h2.ohio.gov/agriculture/.

Additionally, information from the Paulding SWCD

Phone number to office 419-399-4771.  Link to the website for H2Ohio information http://www.pauldingswcd.org/technical-programs/h2ohio/

Investing in Your Soil Series

 

February Investing in Soil Flyer

Join us in a soil health series. Investing in your soil is an interactive program where farmers will be completing hands-on soil health topics along with round table discussion after nightly speaker presentations. You won’t want to miss this program.  The first evening will consist of local farmers from the area in a panel setting. CCA Credits will be offered. A special thanks to The Nature Conservancy on co-sponsoring this program. Program open to farmers, consultants, family members, and the general public. The goal is to attend all three parts of the series but may attend individual sessions.

  • February 24: Featured Speaker Jamie Scott
  • March 9: Featured Speaker Rick Clark
  • March 23: Featured Speaker Local Panel Discussion

Location: Paulding County Extension Office, 503 Fairground Drive, Paulding, OH 45879

Cost: No Charge. Light refreshments included in registration.

Registration: Please register by calling office.

Contact: Sarah Noggle, (419)399-8225, noggle.17@osu.edu

Investing in your Soil Success Series

Why do you care about your soil and what are you willing to invest in it? As times are changing, our farming practices are changing. This series is to get farmers working together to learn hands-on soil health concepts and identify gaps and limits in resources in our communities. Each evening begins with a discussion from either a panel or a featured speaker. After the speaker, a roundtable discussion will follow using the Strategic Doing method. Participants will engage with the group as the evening continues with question and answer sessions. Join us in our 3-part series titled “Investing in your Soil Success”. The goal is for attendees to attend all three sessions as they build upon each other.

Join us in a soil health series. Investing in your soil is an interactive program where farmers will be completing hands-on soil health topics along with round table discussion after nightly speaker presentations. You won’t want to miss this program.  The first evening will consist of local farmers from the area in a panel setting.  A special thanks to The Nature Conservancy on co-sponsoring this program. Program open to farmers, consultants, family members, and the general public.

  • January 13: Featured Speaker Local Panel Discussion
  • February 24: Featured Speaker Jamie Scott
  • March 9: Featured Speaker Rick Clark

Location: Paulding County Extension Office, 503 Fairground Drive, Paulding, OH 45879

Cost: No Charge. Light refreshments included in registration.

Registration: Please register by calling the office or via https://investinginsoilhealthseries.eventbrite.com

Contact: Sarah Noggle, (419)399-8225, noggle.17@osu.edu Continue reading

Two new OSU Extension Soil Fertility Factsheets available

By Steve Culman, Ohio State University Extension

Two new factsheets summarizing key components of the work to update the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations are now available.

Updated Grain Nutrient Removal Rates

How many pounds of nutrients are removed with every bushel of corn, soybean, and wheat harvested? This factsheet reports new numbers and shows how nutrient removal rates in harvested grain have decreased over the past 25 years.

For more information: go.osu.edu/grain.

Converting Soil Test Values: Mehlich-3, Bray P, Ammonium Acetate

The updated Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations will use the Mehlich-3 extractant as the new standard for fertilizer recommendations. This factsheet provides simple, standardized conversions that allow users to convert back and forth from these different extractants.

For more information: go.osu.edu/mehlich.