Farm Office Live is Back!

Farm Office Live” returns virtually this summer as an opportunity for you to get the latest outlook and updates on ag law, farm management, farm business analysis, and other related issues from faculty and educators with the College of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.  Attend “Farm Office Live” online on July 23, 2021, at 10 AM (EST).  To register, please visit https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive 

Federal bills target carbon reduction practices on farms and forests

President Biden announced a major goal this week–for the U.S. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by half over the next decade as compared to 2005 levels.  Agriculture will play a key role in that reduction by “deploying cutting-edge tools to make the soil of our heartland the next frontier in carbon innovation,” according to President Biden.  Several bills introduced in Congress recently could help agriculture fulfill that key role.  The proposals offer incentives and assistance for farmers, ranchers, and forest owners to engage in carbon sequestration practices.

Here’s a summary of the bills that are receiving the most attention.

Growing Climate Solutions ActS. 1251.  The Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee passed S. 1251 today.  The bipartisan proposal led by sponsors Sen. Mike Braun (R-IN), Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) already has the backing of over half of the Senate as co-sponsors, including Ohio’s Sen. Sherrod Brown.  The bill has come up in prior sessions of Congress without success, but the sponsors significantly reworked the bill and reintroduced it this week.  The new version includes these provisions: Continue reading

What Questions Should Farmers Ask about Selling Carbon Credits?

Originally Published in FarmDocDaily:  Sellars, S., G. Schnitkey, C. Zulauf, K. Swanson, and N. Paulson. “What Questions Should Farmers Ask about Selling Carbon Credits?.” farmdoc daily (11):59, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, April 13, 2021. Permalink

By: Sarah Sellars, Gary SchnitkeyKrista Swanson, and Nick Paulson, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois & Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics, The Ohio State University

Agricultural carbon markets exist through privately and publicly owned companies with aim to reduce carbon emissions through trade of carbon units sequestered at the farm level. The sale of carbon credits presents an opportunity for farmers to receive financial benefits from changing to more environmentally beneficial agricultural practices, although carbon prices may not currently be high enough to cover the cost of switching practices. Information about carbon markets can be challenging to navigate because each company typically has a different structure for payments, verification, and data ownership. This article provides a brief background about carbon markets, information about the breakeven price for carbon sequestration practices, and some questions for farmers to consider about selling carbon credits. Continue reading

SOLAR ELECTRIC ECONOMIC ANALYSIS WEBINAR SERIES

SOLAR ELECTRIC ECONOMIC ANALYSIS WEBINAR SERIES

Cost: Free, Supported by North Central Region SARE

Registration 

SARE Webinar Brochure 2021 – final

Our SARE PDP grant is coming to an end. We invite you to join us for our last webinar to learn about the economics and feasibility of solar electric systems for farms, residences, and businesses.

 Who should attend:

  • People who work with farmers and citizens interested in solar; Extension Educators, Rural Bankers, Ag service providers, USDA, State government.
  • If you have attended our webinar series before this will be a review, if not this is a great opportunity to learn about solar applications on farms.

Continue reading

Revisiting Corn Use for Ethanol

By: Todd Hubbs, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois.  farmdoc daily (10):133

Stronger export numbers and lower acreage boosted corn prices since the end of June.  Concerns about demand weakness in ethanol production emerged recently.  A recovery in economic activity helped ethanol plants ramp up production as gasoline demand increased.  A resurgence in virus incidences threatens ethanol production over the short run and injects uncertainty into long-run prospects.

Gasoline demand recovered to almost 89 percent of pre-coronavirus lockdown levels in early July.  Despite this positive development, the recovery in demand flattened out over the last few weeks.  Gasoline stocks began to recede but still sit substantially above levels seen at this time of the year.  Attempts to reopen the economy hit a snag as the virus spread rapidly around the country after initial hopes saw a rapid opening in many areas.  At 8.648 million barrels per day, demand recovered substantially from the low point of 5.311 million barrels per day seen in early April.  The path back to normal gasoline demand levels appears stalled.  Ethanol production followed this recovery and will feel the implications of flattening gasoline use. Continue reading

2020 Leasing your Land for Shale and Solar Webinars

By:  Erika Lyon, Agriculture & Natural Resources Educator, Ohio State University Extension Jefferson & Harrison Counties and Dan Lima, Agriculture & Natural Resources Educator, Ohio State University Extension Belmont County

Across the state of Ohio, landowners are receiving offers to lease their property for the development of oil and natural gas wells, pipelines, or utility-scale solar projects. While the state is regionally divided between the two, with shale development primarily occurring on the eastern side of the state and solar development being concentrated in southwestern Ohio (with some exceptions), the questions about legal agreements, construction, and oversight of both are similar. Continue reading

OSU Extension and Ohio Soybean Council Energy Study: Understanding the Impact of Demand Charges & Power Factor in Agriculture

By Eric Romich, Field Specialist, Energy Development

Farmers have long explored options to provide energy savings associated with their agricultural operations.  Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Soybean Council have partnered to provide research-based data-driven tools to help Ohio farmers assess and navigate various energy infrastructure investment options for their farm.  Specifically, the project team is interested in learning more about your experience and interest in implementing energy management strategies such as peak demand reduction, power factor correction, and/or the integration of solar generation systems to reduce electricity costs on your farm. Continue reading