Farm Office Live – Did You Miss the January Topics? Recording Available.

Farm Office Live provides the latest outlook and updates on ag law, farm management, ag economics, farm business analysis, and other issues dealt with in your farm office. Targeted to farmers and agri-business stakeholders, our specialists digest the latest news and information and present it in an easy-to-understand format.

Photo of Farm Office Team Presenters

To register, visit the Farm Office Live registration site at https://osu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8abbbMu0RdC-oPB5DFuB3w.

Register once and you’ll receive reminders for future sessions.

DOWNLOAD JANUARY SLIDES 

Future dates: 

February 16 7:00 – 8:30 pm
February 18 10:00 – 11:30 am
March 16 7:00 – 8:30 pm
March 18 10:00 – 11:30 am
April 20 7:00 – 8:30 pm
May 18 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Did you miss a Farm Office Live?  Access our past Farm Office Live recordings and materials https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farmofficelive

Be sure to catch an Agricultural Outlook and Policy Meeting this winter

by: Mike Estadt, OSU Extension, estadt.3@osu.edu

The Ohio State University Extension is pleased to announce the Regional Ag Outlook and Policy Meetings for 2022.  Meetings will be held around the state beginning the last of January and ending in March.

Speakers will address a myriad of topics of agriculture interest here in Ohio as well as across the Corn Belt.  Programs will include presentations on Grain Market Outlook, Ag Law Updates, Dairy Industry 2022, Ohio’s Changing Climate, Farm Policy, and Farm Bill, SB 52: Utility Solar Legislative, Farm Real Estate, and Cash Rent Trends, Ag Input Price Projections, and Federal Tax Updates.

New to this year’s program is the statewide sponsorship and support of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

“We are proud to partner with Ohio State University  Extension educators across the state to support this year’s agronomy, outlook, and grower meetings.  We value this partnership and look forward to supporting programs that bring value to our member’s farm businesses”, according to Brad Moffitt, Director of Membership and Market Development for the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

The following table lists the scheduled Outlook programs with contact information to register. Continue reading

New 5-Minute Ag Topic Video: Manure

Click below to view the second video in our new 5-Minute Ag Topic video series, which we hope to continue over the course of 2022. The topic for this second video is manure. Water Quality Extension Associate Rachel Cochran discusses different types of manure, rules and regulations surrounding its use, benefits to applying manure, as well as safety considerations. If you have any suggestions for future video topics, or would like to get information regarding manure research opportunities on your farm, please reach out to cochran.474@osu.edu or noggle.17@osu.edu.

Registration is REQUIRED for January 18 Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification

Greetings all,

Registration is required for the January 18, Fertilizer and Pesticide Recertification in Paulding County.  We now have a link to register online and we now also have a credit card payment option. You must have an email address to pay by credit card.

The link to our registration is http://go.osu.edu/2022PauldingPATFERT

You may also use the following QR code by scanning to your phone:

As a reminder: Fertilizer Recertification will begin at 8:30 AM and Pesticide Recertification will begin at 9:30 AM. We will conclude at 12:45 PM. Our location address for GPS is 503 Fairground Drive, Paulding, OH 45879.

Upcoming Paulding County Private Pesticide and Fertilizer RE-Certification.

Happy Holidays!! By now many of you who are up for certification for Private Pesticide or Commercial/Private Fertilizer (Category 15) are receiving letters your renewal letters from the Ohio Department of Agriculture. If you have completed your total hours for re-certification, you may mail the invoice and payment into ODA for the $30. There is also an option to pay online at https://www.planthealthrenewal.agri.ohio.gov/ApplicatorPrivate/. To pay online with a debit/credit card, you will need to have the control ID/number on the back of your card. Unfortunately, if your card is worn out, and you can’t read the number, our office does not have access to those.  You would need to call ODA.

If you have not taken the classes, Paulding County is offering the class on Tuesday, January 18 (Fertilizer at 8:30 AM and Pesticide at 9:30 AM). The classes are $35 for Pesticides and $10 for fertilizer (If you need both, $45).  You may send in registration and payment to Sarah Noggle, ATTN: PAT/FERT,  503 Fairground Drive, Paulding, OH 45879. You will need to print and include the following registration form with your payment. Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification Flyer – 2022  Our office can’t take credit card payments at this time.

Our offices are closed from December 23 to December 30 so if you have any questions please email Sarah at noggle.17@osu.edu

Upcoming Water Quality Wednesday Winter Programming

Join the Ohio State University’s Water Quality Extension Associates for a webinar series discussing topics related to water quality, ranging from Phosphorus and agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) to watershed planning and technology. Continue reading

New 5-Minute Ag Topic Video: Phosphorus

Click below to view the first video in our new 5-Minute Ag Topic video series, which we hope to release over the next few months. This first video topic is Phosphorus, where Water Quality Extension Associate Rachel Cochran discusses a quick overview of this essential plant nutrient. If you have any suggestions for future topics, please reach out to noggle.17@osu.edu or cochran.474@osu.edu.

Safety Around Manure Pits

Tragedy struck a farm family in Mercer County when three brothers were killed after entering the manure storage on their dairy farm. This is an unimaginable loss and one that occurs way too often. It is hard to stand by and wait for help when a loved one is unconscious in a dangerous situation but we see time and again how entering to save them often leads to the death of another family member. Please be aware of all the dangers on your farm and inform your family and employees as well. To learn more about manure gasses, read this fact sheet.

Purdue Researcher Shalamar Armstrong to speak in Paulding County on Thursday, August 19

Know via his Twitter handle as the @CoverCropDr, Dr. Shalamar Armstrong is an Associate Professor of Soil Conservation and Management in the Department of Agronomy at Purdue University. He holds a B.S. degree in Plant and Soil Science from Southern University, an M.S. in Soil Fertility from Alabama A&M University, and a Ph.D. in Agronomy from Purdue University.

Paulding County is very excited to host a soil health tour round-up event with Armstrong as the keynote speaker. Speaker Shalamar Armstrong of Purdue University will speak on Cover Crops’ Effects on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycling and Fate, and certified crop advisor credits will be available for this talk. In addition, talk with farmers from Northwest Ohio about different practices used to improve soil health on their farms. This event follows the Northwest Ohio Soil Health Tour showcasing different soil health practices, such as reduced tillage, cover crop usage, manure usage, and structural practices such as controlled drainage and wetlands.

Soil Health Event – Thursday, August 19th from 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM; networking from 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM with speaker Shalamar Armstrong beginning his talk at 7:30 PM. A free meal is being sponsored by The Nature Conservancy and an RSVP is appreciated by Wednesday, August 18 by 5:00 PM.

Where:  Soil Health Event – Paulding County Extension Building, 503 Fairground Dr. Paulding, OH 45879

Cost: No cost

RSVP: Registration is required for the Soil Health Event, as a meal will be provided at go.osu.edu/soilhealthtour

For more information, contact Rachel Cochran at Cochran.474@osu.edu or 567-344-5016 or Sarah Noggle, noggle.17@osu.edu or 419-399-8225

Farmer Advocates wanted!

Do you know of a farmer who would be an excellent candidate with leadership, enthusiasm, and passion for soil health and water quality management as a Farmer Advocate for Conservation? You can nominate them by completing an online form. Select the button for the application.

The Nature Conservancy is looking for farmers who are currently utilizing cover crops on their farms in the Maumee River Watershed of the Western Lake Erie Basin. We are looking for a diverse group of farmers; large acreage, small acreage, corn and soy, small grains, livestock, new and experienced, willing to reach out and share their knowledge and experiences with other farmers in their area. Selected farmers will be compensated for their time. Select the button for this application.

If you are interested in being part of this exciting farmer-led outreach project and would like to apply as a Farmer Advocate for Conservation please complete the online application form by selecting the button above.

The application period is open for farmers in the Western Lake Erie Basin that are interested in sharing their conservation farming practices with other farmers.  Farmer Advocates will be compensated for their time to attend the training and work with other farmers @ $30/hour.  The focus of the project is to promote farmers learning from each other about building soil health and managing water.

To apply as a Farmer Advocate for Conservation or to nominate a farmer you believe would be an excellent candidate please use the online application and nomination forms on the landing page found at https://sites.google.com/view/farmeradvocate or please contact Stephanie Singer, Stephanie.Singer@tnc.org.

The Dirt on Soil Health: Investing Below the Surface recordings available.

Did you miss out on the live presentations for this winter on The Dirt on Soil Health: Investing Below the Surface? Great news! Recordings are available for the entire series of topics.

In this weekly series, farmers, industry, and academic experts weighed in on practical steps to improve soil health and measure impact on crop yield and farm profitability.

Recordings and Slide Sets are available at https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/webinar-recordings/dirt-soil-health-investing-below-surface-0 or on the OSU Agronomic Crops Team YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYlh_BdeqniJPI5Ga7icO7mbFzDdpK7fr or by clicking one of the videos below.

Does It Pay to Improve Soil Health on Your Farm?

Panel discussion with farmers Nathan Brown (Highland County), Matt Falb (Wayne County), and Les Seiler (Fulton County).

Continue reading

Is It Too Early to Apply Nitrogen to Wheat?—-Yes

From Laura Lindsey and Ed Lentz, OSU Extension

With melted snow and warmer weather in the forecast, is it time to apply nitrogen to the wheat?

The short answer. Wait until green-up to apply N to wheat.

The long answer. Wheat does not require large amounts of N until stem elongation/jointing (Feekes Growth Stage 6), which is generally the middle or the end of April depending on the location in the state and spring temperature. Ohio research has shown no yield benefit from N applications made prior to this time. Soil organic matter and/or N applied at planting generally provide sufficient N for early growth until stem elongation.

Nitrogen applied prior to rapid uptake by the plant has the potential to be lost and unavailable for the crop. Nitrogen source will also affect the potential for loss. Urea-ammonium nitrate (28%) has the greatest potential for loss, ammonium sulfate the least, and urea would be somewhere between the two other sources. Continue reading

Projected Returns for 2021 – Increasing Fertilizer Prices May Force Tough Decisions

From Barry Ward and John Barker

The profit margin outlook for corn, soybeans, and wheat is relatively positive as planting season approaches. Prices of all three of our main commodity crops have moved higher since last summer and forward prices for this fall are currently at levels high enough to project positive returns for 2021 crop production. Recent increases in fertilizer prices have negatively affected projected returns. Higher crop insurance costs, as well as moderately higher energy costs relative to last year, will also add to overall costs for 2021.

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be modestly higher compared to last year with higher fertilizer, fuel, and crop insurance expenses. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2021 are projected to range from $386 to $470 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2021 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $216 to $242 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2021 are projected to range from $166 to $198 per acre. Continue reading

Do you need the Ohio Fertilizer Certification?

The question this week in the Paulding County Extension Office: Do I need to have the Fertilizer Certification?

Producers who have let their Fertilizer Certification expire or who are new producers needing the Fertilizer Certification based upon Senate Bill 150 have two options to obtain this training.

  1. Take the Fertilizer Certification Test via the Ohio Department of Agriculture. (Link to Testing Dates and Times)
  2. Take the in-person class.

One of the only opportunities in NW Ohio to receive the certification is in Allen County (Lima) on March 3rd from 6:00 – 9:00 pm.  The class size is limited and you must call or email to register. See the flyer here: FACT Flyer2021 Pre-Registration is required by February 26th. The cost for this training session is $30/person and includes training materials and handouts. To register, please call 419-879-9108 or email Clint Schroeder at schroeder.307@osu.edu. Location: Allen County Fairgrounds – Youth Activities Building, 2750 Harding Hwy, Lima, OH 45804 Continue reading

2021 Precision U: Tackling Spring Operations with Reduced Working Days

2021 Precision U Flyer

2021 Precision U: Tackling Spring Operations with Reduced Working Days

  • January 5 – Gambling with Planting Decisions – Dr. Aaron Wilson (Ohio State University Extension) and Dr. Bob Nielsen (Purdue University)
  • January 12 – Improving Fertilizer Efficiency with the Planter Pass – Matt Bennett (Precision Planting Technology) and Dr. John Fulton (Ohio State University)
  • January 19 – Pre-season Crop Protection Decisions – Dr. Mark Loux and Dr. Scott Shearer (Ohio State University)
  • January 26 – Sprayer Technology to Improve Field Performance – Dr. Joe Luck (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

There is no cost to register for Precision University, but registration is required. CCA CEUs will be offered at each session. For more information or to register, visit http://go.osu.edu/PrecisionU.

Using Soil Tests Phosphorus Results to Identify Agronomic and Conservation Needs

What is a soil test? | Dreamlawns Lawn Care“What are the right decisions for phosphorus management in crop production that reduce water quality impacts?” is a common question I have from farmers looking to improve yield yet are concerned about downstream water quality impacts of phosphorus.

A representative agronomic soil test has long been an essential tool for sound agronomic nutrient management decisions. That same agronomic test result can be a useful indicator for identifying fields where additional conservation practices might improve water quality. Fields with Soil Test Phosphorus (STP) levels two to three times higher than the agronomic need result in increased phosphorus losses measured on the edge of field water quality monitoring.

As soil test results are reviewed this fall, consider keeping a list of fields in three categories based on STP levels that define the risk of yield loss for the corn/soybean rotation and risk of increased water quality impacts.

  1. Less than 20 PPM Mehlich 3 STP (or 30 PPM if wheat/alfalfa in the rotation)
  2. Between 20-40 PPM (or 30-50 PPM if wheat/alfalfa are in the rotation)
  3. Greater than 50 PPM

Continue reading

Private Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification Opportunities Online

The Effect of Variable Rate Fertilizer ApplicationPrivate Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification Opportunities Online
Do you still need pesticide recertification for 2020?  There are two options for private applicators that still need to get their recertification credits for this past 2020 season. Here are your options:

1. ONLINE: OSU Extension is offering a TEMPORARY online solution to those who were unable to recertify as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Online private pesticide recertification is a one size fits all, three-hour program. The course is self-paced so applicators can complete it at their convenience, as long as they meet the deadline (90 days after the emergency Executive Order ends or December 1, 2020). The cost is $35 and includes these segments:

  • Core: 1 hour
  • Category 1, Grain & Cereal Crops:  30 min
  • Category 2, Forage & Livestock:  30 min
  • Category 3, Fruit & Vegetable Crops:  15 min
  • Category 4,  Nursery & Forest Crops:  15 min
  • Category 5,  Greenhouse Crops:  15 min
  • Category 6, Fumigation:  15 min
  • What you will need to recertify:
    • Your pesticide license number.   If you do not know your number, call the extension office or ODA directly for assistance.
    • An email address. Applicators will need to create a username and password to access the modules.
    • Access to the internet. Register at: https://pested.osu.edu/onlinerecert
  • Recertification for fertilizer certificate holders (private and commercial) will be available as a separate course for $10.

2. IN OFFICE: Contact our office to come in and view video courses. Please reserve three hours for the Private Pesticide license and one hour for fertilizer recertification. Pesticide only is $35; fertilizer is $10.

Please note: Recertification under this option is only available for those people expiring in 2020.  I will have more details on the 2021 recertification in a future blog post.

Surface Application of Manure to Newly Planted Wheat Fields

Manure Application to Wheat

By Glen Arnold, Manure and Nutrient Management Specialist, OSU

Several livestock producers have inquired about applying liquid dairy or swine manure to newly planted wheat fields using a drag hose. The thought process is that the fields are firm (dry), there is very little rain in the nearby forecast, and the moisture in the manure could help with wheat germination and emergence.

The manure nutrients could easily replace the commercial fertilizer normally applied in advance of planting wheat. The application of fall-applied livestock manure to newly planted or growing crops can reduce nutrient losses compared to fall-applied manure without a growing crop.

Both swine and dairy manure can be used to add moisture to newly planted wheat. It’s important that the wheat seeds were properly covered with soil when planted to keep a barrier between the salt and nitrogen in the manure and the germinating wheat seed. It’s also important that livestock producers know their soil phosphorus levels, and the phosphorus in the manure being applied, so we don’t grow soil phosphorus levels beyond what is acceptable. Continue reading

Fertility Calculator for Ohio Recommendation

A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet has been developed to support nutrient management education programs provided by Ohio State University Extension and for users who want to generate their own recommendation or compare recommendations provided to them to the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, and Alfalfa, 2020. The spreadsheet is designed to be compatible with the Excel version, Excel 1997-2003, or later.

The tool generates recommendations for the following crops:

  1. Corn
  2. Corn-Silage
  3. Soybeans
  4. Wheat (Grain Only)
  5. Wheat (Grain & Straw)
  6. Alfalfa
  7. Grass Hay
  8. Grass/Legume Hay

Continue reading

Updated Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations Available

Evaluating Fertilizer Purchase Decisions: Frequently Asked QuestionsThe authors of the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, and Alfalfa include Steve Culman, Anthony Fulford, James Camberato, Kurt Steinke, Laura Lindsey, Greg LaBarge, Harold Watters, Ed Lentz, Ryan Haden, Eric Richer, Bethany Herman, Nicole Hoekstra, Peter Thomison, Rich Minyo, Anne Dorrance, Jeff Rutan, Darryl Warncke, Cassandra Brown

The Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, and Alfalfa was first published in 1995 and has served as a cornerstone in nutrient management in field crops for Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. As crop production practices in this region changed over the past 25 years, many questioned if these nutrient management guidelines were still relevant today.

In 2014, work began to revise and update the nutrient management recommendations in corn, soybeans, and wheat. Over 300 on-farm trials were conducted across 34 Ohio counties, including trials evaluating crop response to N, P, K, and S. It was a tremendous collective effort with the ultimate goal of providing objective information to farmers to manage nutrients as judiciously and profitably as possible.

The recommendations have been comprehensively revised and updated. A summarized version can be found online: go.osu.edu/fert-recs

There is a menu at the bottom of this webpage that will allow users to view the topics of interest, including an executive summary that provides the highlights. The full version of the recommendations is being finalized at OSU Extension Publishing and a downloadable pdf and printed bulletin will be available soon.