Facing the Future Together: Living and Working Well in a Complex World

Facing the Future Together: Living and Working Well in a Complex World poster is a poster (2) at the OSU Extension Annual Conference 2022.

Poster Description We live in a complex world. Family and consumer sciences is the field of study focused on the science and art of living and working well in our complex world. We would like to share that “art and science” with our colleagues. The ESP Extension Professionals’ Creed states: “I believe that education is a lifelong process, and the greatest university is the home.” Not only is education a lifelong process for those we serve in our communities, but we are also fortunate to be lifelong learners. Using the theme of “facing the future together,” we will share real-life examples of learning across the life span and leveraging the work of the family in the home to increase Extension’s impact and empower individuals, families, and communities to thrive.

 

Authors: Patrice Powers-Barker – educator, family and consumer sciences; Marie Economos – educator, family and consumer sciences; Margaret Jenkins – educator, family and consumer sciences; Heather Reister – educator, family and consumer sciences; Katie Schlagheck – educator, family and consumer sciences; Sandra Slater – educator, family and consumer sciences

References:

American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences aafcs.org

Heckman Equation. (2022). Quantifying the Life-cycle Benefits of a Prototypical Early Childhood Program https://heckmanequation.org/resource/lifecycle-benefits-influential-early-childhood-program/

Lin, J. T., Bumcrot, C., Mottola, G., Valdes, O., Ganem, R., Kieffer, C., Lusardi, A., & Walsh, G. (2022). Financial Capability in the United States: Highlights from the FINRA Foundation National Financial Capability Study (5th Edition). FINRA Investor Education Foundation. www.FINRAFoundation.org/NFCSReport2021

National Council on Family Relations family.science 

Nickols, S., Ralston, P., Anderson, C., Browne, L., Schroeder, G., Thomas, S., and Wild, P. (2009). The Family and Consumer Sciences Body of Knowledge and the Cultural Kaleidoscope: Research Opportunities and Challenges. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, vol. 37, No. 3: 266-283.

Scheer, S. D. (2021). Introducing the Human Development-EcoLogic Model: A Practical Approach for Outreach and Extension Education Programs. The Journal of Extension, 58(2), Article 29. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/joe/vol58/iss2/29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nurturing Environments for Positive Care

November 22, Nurturing Environments for Positive Care by Patrice Powers-Barker, CFLE, (Certified Family Life Educator). This webinar is one lesson in the Connection Cafe: Caregiving Around the Clock, 2022

All References are listed at the end but this list will help direct participants to specific resources:

Safe storage and disposal of medication:

Blogs:

Wellness Wheels:

All References:

Holiday Expense Planning

Starting Today:

  • Choose the best options for this year’s holiday spending
  • Ask your loved ones about their preferences
  • Create a holiday spending plan (or commit to listing your spending this year)
  • Identify your hidden holiday costs
  • Make a plan for next year’s holiday expenses (Jan. Apr. June)

 

To help prioritize, asked loved ones ….

  • If you could only choose one favorite activity for the holidays, what would it be?
  • Is there a food dish, treat, or drink that you would really miss if it weren’t on the holiday menu?
  • Do you have any ideas about simplifying our holiday schedule?
  • Do you have any ideas about reducing our costs?

 

Handout: My Holiday Savings and Spending Plan.  https://americasaves.org/media/dxjflmii/holiday-savings-and-spending-plan.pdf

 

Apps (there are many options, this is just a sample of some of the apps to help organize planning and spending)

  • Giftster
  • Santa’s Bag
  • GiftPlanner
  • Gift List Diary
  • Christmas Gift List

 

 

These food ideas are not to replace favorite holiday dishes but instead to think about easy foods to add to the holiday season – from the larger get together pot-lucks to other times like hosting out-of-town guests or planning meals when the kids are off school for holiday break.

 

Find Your Local County Extension Office: https://extension.osu.edu/lao

 

References:

Rupp, M. (2021). Preparing for Holiday Expenses. Webinar. Ohio State University Extension.

Stefura, B., Scammahorn, R., and Kline, R. (2022). Give the Gift of Financial Fitness This Holiday. Live Healthy Live Well Webinar. Ohio State University Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

OSU Extension partnering with FCS teachers in Lucas County

In Lucas County we are fortunate to have school districts that offer Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) classes to high school students and some offer it in middle school and/or junior high school. When students are choosing their classes for the next year, it may or may not say “Family and Consumer Sciences” but some of the specific classes that fall under this field might have course titles like: Principles of Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Transitions and Careers, Personal Finance Management, Textiles and Interior Design, Personal Wellness, Human Growth and Development or Child Development. Please encourage students to consider taking these classes!

The following document has a list of classes that Patrice Powers-Baker, OSU Extension, Lucas County, FCS Educator offers to present to middle school/junior high and high school students (in Lucas County Ohio). Her email is powers-barker.1@osu.edu and the document describes the following classes:

  • Feeding a Family
  • Introduction to Local Foods
  • “Outlaw” Veggies – what to do with all these vegetables?
  • Plan a Menu Garden for Health and Wellness
  • PAX Tools for Families and Caregivers
  • The Spending Game (aka Count Your Beans)
  • Food Choice and Food Insecurity
  • Mindfulness
  • Food For Young Children
  • Universal Design
  • Plastics in the Home
  • Real Money Real World

Document for Lucas County FCS teachers, Extension lessons for High School and Middle School FCS classes

In addition to classes that are specifically offered by the FCS Educator, there might be additional options for teachers like partnering with 4H Youth Development or Community Nutrition Education.

OSU Extension: Then and Now

Established over 100 years ago (1914), how does the national Cooperative Extension Service serve communities now? These resources will focus on Ohio State University Extension, with a brief history and current highlights. Emphasis will be on Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) programming for individuals and families across the lifespan.

If you attended 2022, August 1st session at OATFCS and need additional materials, please email Patrice at powers-barker.1@osu.edu

CLASS PARTICIPANTS: please take a moment to complete an evaluation for the August 1st session. Click HERE    (IF promoted, for an access code, please use R-Zfd0mvuUoEngrtv  (the first 0 is a zero)

A copy of the PowerPoint can be found HERE.

Brief Timelines:

Links to Other Resources:

OSU Extension Programs and Resources:

References: (in addition to those listed above)

Clark-Robinson, M. (2021). Standing on Her Shoulders: a Celebration of Women. (L. Freeman, Illus.). Orchard Books.

Donnan, R. (1954). The Beginning of Agricultural Extension Work in Northwestern Ohio. The Historical Society of Northwestern Ohio, Toledo. Northwest Ohio Quarterly, Winter 1954, Volume XXVI – No. 1.

Dreilinger, D. (2021). The secret history of home economics: How trailblazing women harnessed the power of home and changed the way we live. W W Norton & Company.

McGregor, S. (2020). Home ecology to home economics and beyond: Ellen Swallow Richards’ disciplinary contributions. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences. Vol. 112 No. 2.

Miami University. Digital Collections. Alice Swisher Memorial: https://digital.lib.miamioh.edu/digital/collection/facmem/id/209

Nickols, S., Ralston, P., Anderson, C., Browne, L., Schroeder, G., Thomas, S., and Wild, P. (2009). The family and consumer sciences body of knowledge and the cultural kaleidoscope: Research opportunities and challenges. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, vol 37:3: 266-283.

Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction

Virtual Handout on Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction.

  • Define burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction
  • Review researched recommendations
  • Practice a few short exercises
  • Set a personal intention related to compassion satisfaction

Questions? Contact Patrice powers-barker.1@osu.edu

Resources:


References (including previous resources listed above):

Bergstrom, C. (2017) Three senses mindfulness activity for kids, teens, and grown ups. Blissful Kids. https://blissfulkids.com/three-senses-mindfulness-activity-kids-teens-grown-ups/

Compassion Fatigue Awareness Project. (2021). https://compassionfatigue.org/index.html

Coping with COVID: Lesson Plans to Promote Mental, Emotional and Social Health (MESH). (2020). Ohio State University. 4-H Healthy Living Design Team.  https://ohio4h.org/books-and-resources/design-team-curriculum/coping-covid-lesson-plans-promote-mental-emotional-and

Coyne LW, Gould ER, Grimaldi M, Wilson KG, Baffuto G, Biglan A. (2020) First Things First: Parent Psychological Flexibility and Self-Compassion During COVID19

Golden, A. (2021). Supporting Yourself in Uncertain Times Webinar. Bright Horizons. https://event.on24.com/wcc/r/3408866/3063A19E2F4E5AF1A809639C1DC076F7

Kent, C. (2016). 10 ways to survive what you can’t control: As more stresses originate beyond our reach, being a physician is more challenging than ever. Review of Ophthalmology. https://www.reviewofophthalmology.com/article/10-ways-to-survive-what-you-cant-control

Kraynak, A. (2020). Compassion fatigue in the time of COVID. Network, 33(4), p4-5.

Kumar, A., Killingsworth, M., and Gilovich, T. (2014, August 21). Waiting for merlot: Anticipatory consumption of experiential and material purchases. Psychological Science.

Manage stress: Strengthen your support network. (2019) American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/topics/stress/manage-social-support

Marrison, E. (2019). My future self. Live Healthy Live Well. Ohio State University. https://livehealthyosu.com/2019/12/12/my-future-self/

Mayo Clinic Staff. (n.d.)  Job burnout: How to spot it and take action https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/burnout/art-20046642

Neupert, S. (2020). Knowledge is power: learning more about COVID-19 can reduce your pandemic stress. North Carolina State University.

Polk, M.G., Smith, E.L., Zhang, L.-R., & Neupert, S.D. (2020). Thinking ahead and staying in the present: Implications for reactivity to daily stressors. Personality and Individual Differences.

Powers-Barker, P., Carter, S., Worthington, T. (2019). Mindful Wellness. Ohio State University. https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/mindful-wellness/

Powers-Barker, P. (2021). What’s wrong with positivity. Live Healthy Live Well Blog. Ohio State University.  https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/04/08/whats-wrong-with-positivity/

The Importance of Having a Support System. (2020). Mental Health First Aid, News, Self-Care. https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/2020/08/the-importance-of-having-a-support-system/

Tips for Disaster Responders: Understanding Compassion Fatigue. (2014). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). HHS Publication No. SMA-14-4869. https://store.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/d7/priv/sma14-4869.pdf


The November 5, 2021 Zoom session for OSU Extension colleagues also shared the following:


 

The Secret History of Home Economics and Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS)

 

 

Description for FCS 2021 Conference:

This break-out session will use history and future planning to find and sustain balance in the midst of current change. Whether our work and position title are more along the lines of traditional Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) programming that covers all three healthies or particular to one of the healthies or specific to community nutrition (which all fall under the broad umbrella of FCS), this session will touch upon themes among all three healthies. The need to understand, relate and promote FCS is important to all of us for this field of work. We are fortunate to learn from history as well as be able to make action plans for a successful future.

This session will use the newly published book (2021) The Secret History of Home Economics: How Trailblazing Women Harnessed the Power of Home and Changed the Way We Live by Danielle Dreilinger as a source to look at where we’ve been and where we are going. Although the presenters recommend the book as a good read, participants to this session do not have to read the book beforehand. The co-presenters will offer a short history of Home Economics through Family and Consumer Sciences in the United States, highlight some of the great successes, conflicts and changes from the mid1800s through current time.

Dreilinger lists five recommendations in the conclusion of her book. Participants will review the recommendations and share how we can promote this valuable profession.

Participants will:

  • Discover inspiring (often untold) stories from the past professionals
    in our field of work
  • Learn from the past as we create present and future healthy lifework balance
  • Use Dreilinger’s five recommendations in the conclusion to inspire a 5-step action plan
  • Be inspired to add their current professional story to the contemporary narrative of FCS

Co-presenters: 

Patrice Powers-Barker, OSU FCS Educator, Lucas County powers-barker.1@osu.edu

Melissa J. Rupp, OSU FCS Educator, Fulton County rupp.26@osu.edu

Brief Timeline FCS in Extension

References from the presentation:

For Our Teachers – Mindfulness and Self-Care

In recognition of teachers as professionals, educators, and caregivers, a session at the OATFCS – Ohio Association Teachers of Family Consumer Sciences conference focused on Mindfulness and Self-Care. This page has links to resources that were shared during the webinar.

Three recommended articles for teachers:

Mindful Mindset mini-lessons – this page was designed in partnership with a High School FCS teacher during remote learning. The links on this page were shared with staff as well as high school students with a sample of short online mindfulness practices as well as a link to Live Smart Ohio blog post on what to look for in a mindfulness app.

Mindful Practices depending on how much time you have, from 30 seconds to ten minutes.

Article Tech Tools to Support a Mindful Classroom

Check out Greater Good in Education – Science-Based Practices for Kinder, Happier Schools

Mindful Wellness is the Ohio State University Extension curriculum and series of lessons designed for adults. OSU Extension Educators teach in-person as well as remotely. If you are interested in offering Mindful Wellness to adults in your community (for example, worksite wellness), please use the following link to contact one our state representatives: go.osu.edu/mindfulwellness

If you would like to contact the two presenters from the August 2, 2021 webinar, emails below:

  • Patrice Powers-Barker, Ohio State University Extension, Lucas County Family and Consumer Sciences, powers-barker.1@osu.edu
  • Melinda Hill, Ohio State University Extension, Wayne County Family and Consumer Sciences, hill.14@osu.edu

If you or someone you know is experiencing Compassion Fatigue, Burn Out or any other struggles, please share information with others to seek help.

Ohio Care Line 1-800-720-9616

List of References for the webinar

Creamy Pumpkin Pasta – Create Your Own

Inspired by the work of Utah State University Extension and their Create Better Health series of recipes, specifically their Create a Skillet Meal handout, this create-your-own Creamy Pumpkin Pasta is a good choice for a few reasons:

The photo shows the recipe on the left with fresh rosemary, cooked on the stovetop and the right shows the recipe with nutmeg and crushed red pepper cooked in an electric skillet with deep sides and glass lid.

  • It’s fast and easy
  • The pumpkin is a great source of vitamin A
  • It’s adult – and child – approved!
  • It’s easy to adapt this basic recipe to meet your family’s needs and preferences:
    • Choose low-sodium broth
    • Add your own protein – from cooked chicken to a vegetarian version with Cannellini beans
    • Choose your favorite seasonings

 

Basic Recipe for One-Pot Creamy Pumpkin Pasta

Approximately 4 servings

Pasta – 8 oz pasta (linguine, penne or egg noodles)
Broth – 4 cups (can choose low-sodium, vegetarian, etc.)
Canned Pumpkin – 2 cups (1 – 15-oz can pumpkin)
Cheese – 4 oz (cream cheese, goat cheese or mascarpone)
Pepper – ¼ teaspoon
Choose Seasonings
• ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg OR 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary
• 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Decide on optional ingredients:
• Optional (to cook in the one-pot recipe): ½ medium onion (about 1 cup) and 2 Tablespoons chopped garlic, salt to taste
• Optional: (to add to the pot towards the end) a large handful of fresh chopped greens such as spinach, arugula, swiss chard to cook or wilt towards the end
• Optional (to garnish): fresh parsley, parmesan cheese

1. Choose your favorite one-pot cooking method: either a large, heavy pot on the stovetop or a medium to large size electric skillet with a glass lid.

2. Add pasta, broth, pumpkin, pepper, and dry seasonings to the pot. (if choosing to use onions and or garlic, add this also).

3. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook. Stir frequently, until the liquid is almost completely evaporated (approximately 10 minutes). The pasta should be tender and the sauce will start to thicken.

4. Remove from heat. Stir in the cheese until it is melted and combined. If using fresh chopped greens or fresh rosemary, add it at this point. Let sit a few minutes for the sauce to thicken.

5. Serve with (optional) garnishes like fresh parsley and parmesan cheese.

Other versions of this recipe can be found here and  here.

OSU Extension Mindfulness In-Service 2020

For more information about the OSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Mindful Wellness Program please visit the website. 

Agenda, Handouts and Links, August 20, 2020

As part of the 2020 Family and Consumer Sciences Professional Development Monthly In-services that have moved to a virtual platform, we are pleased to invite all OSU Extension staff to join our August Mindfulness In-Service. This In-Service will focus on the 2019 Mindful Wellness Curriculum, general resources, an on-your-own mindfulness activity, and experiences related to the broad topic of mindfulness. Mindfulness is applicable to OSU staff across all Extension program areas. Participants decided if they wanted to attend one, two, three, or all four of the August 20th sessions.

Description of Session 1: Introduction to Mindfulness, using the OSU Extension Mindful Wellness Curriculum 9:00AM-10:30AM

The Mindful Wellness curriculum (2019) is designed to equip healthy adults with practice and skills to strengthen the mind and body connection and promote holistic health and wellness across the lifespan. Participants in this session will participate in the one-hour Introduction to Mindfulness class and will learn more about the Mindful Wellness curriculum. For those who have previously attended a Mindful Wellness Curriculum training, the presentation will look familiar to what has been shared in the past but you are welcome to attend. We have found that we always learn something new about mindfulness even if it is an introduction lesson. Presenters: Melinda Hill, Marie Economos, Pat Holmes and Chris Kendle.

Description of Session 2: Mindfulness as a Tool During COVID-19, 11:00AM-12:00PM

Even before the arrival of COVID-19, stress had already been identified as a major health problem for Americans. Not only do we need to care for health and wellness when there is illness, but we also need to practice preventive care to stay well physically, mentally, and emotionally. Although we could never cover all of the resources related to mindfulness, this session will highlight some easily accessible, online, educational resources. They will be shared as timely tools for personal and professional use during this time of uncertainty. Presenters: Patrice Powers-Barker, Shari Gallup and Laura Stanton.

Description of Session 3: Mindful Afternoon Special – Your Choice

Do you remember “specials” in school like classes for art, physical education and music? We invite you to plan a mindfulness special today.  We know the days are busy, you need to fit things in and multitasking seems like the only option. We also know the benefits of practicing mindfulness. We invite you to use this time for personal mindfulness practice. We will share a list of ideas prior to the day, have an open zoom call (with music but no discussion or lesson) and then collect a list (via chat) of what our colleagues chose to do to practice mindfulness.

Description of Session 4: Mindfulness Panel, 2:00PM-3:30PM

In Mindful Foundations (one of the individual lessons within the Mindful Wellness curriculum series) instructors are encouraged to, “Open the class with a short example from your own mindfulness journey. This is so powerful for the class to understand the how and why of your passion for topic.” Join this session to learn from FCS colleagues who have found a mindfulness practice that works best for them. Practicing mindfulness offers not only personal benefits but can also increase professional excellence.

  • Some of our colleagues have previously shared about their mindfulness journeys via blog posts on Live Smart Ohio  (mind and body category)
  • Thank you Pat Bebo for moderating the panel. Panelists: Kathy Tutt, Shannon Carter, Patrice Powers-Barker with assistance by Laura Stanton.

Questions? The following professionals are on the 2020 Mindful Wellness Team and help with the planning and presentation of this in-service (all emails coming soon!)

Stacey Baker baker.782@osu.edu

Shannon Carter Carter.314@osu.edu

Marie Economos economos.2@osu.edu

Shari Gallup gallup.1@osu.edu

Whitney Gherman gherman.12@osu.edu

Misty Harmon harmon.416@osu.edu

Melinda Hill hill.14@osu.edu

Pat Holmes holmes.86@osu.edu

Chris Kendle kendle.4@osu.edu

Patrice Powers-Barker powers-barker.1@osu.edu

Roseanne Scammahorn scammahorn.5@osu.edu

Laura Stanton stanton.60@osu.edu

Michelle Treber treber.1@osu.edu

Kathy Tutt tutt.19@osu.edu