Putting Ash Wood to Good Use – Lessons from the Urban Wood Network

By: Amy Stone, OSU Extension Lucas Co.

Earlier this month, Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) hosted an online webiner entitled, “Putting Ash Wood to Good Use – Lessons from the Urban Wood Network.” While many of us from Ohio have already lived through the devastation of EAB; some may have utilized the ash, some may have not, but either way, you will enjoy the webinar presented by Don Peterson, executive director of the Urban Wood Network to learn more about what is happening in this arena across the county when it comes to urban wood utilization.

All EABU sessions are recorded and posted on the EABU You Tube Channel following the live presentation.

To check out the Urban Wood Utilization session, check out this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrksAL-mGfM&feature=youtu.be

To learn more about EABU and look at past session, or view a calendar of upcoming sessions, you can explore on the EABU webpage on the Regional Emerald Ash Borer website, http://www.emeraldashborer.info/

The National Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program Scores a “Win”

By: Joe Boggs, OSU Extension

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) (Anoplophora glabripennis) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America.  The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families.  This includes Acer (all maple species); Aesculus (horsechestnuts and buckeyes); Ulmus (elms); Salix (willows); Betula (birches); Platanus (Sycamore/Planetrees); Populus (Poplars); Albizia (Mimosa); Cercidiphyllum (Katsura); Fraxinus (ashes); Koelreuteria (goldenraintree); and Sorbus (mountainash). Continue reading

Corn Earworm in Field Corn; Watch for Molds

By: Kelley TilmonPierce PaulAndy Michel, OSU Extension

There have been recent reports of high corn earworm populations in certain grain corn fields.  Corn earworm is a pest with many hosts including corn, tomatoes and certain legumes.  In Ohio it is typically considered a pest of sweet corn rather than field corn, but this past week substantial populations have been found in certain field corn sites.  Corn earworm moths are most attracted to fields in the early green silk stage as a place to lay their eggs.  These eggs hatch into the caterpillars that cause ear-feeding damage, open the ear to molds, and attract birds.  With a wide range of planting dates this year, different fields may be at greater risk at different times. Continue reading

Stink Bug Management In Non-Uniform Crop Stages

By: Kelley Tilmon and Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension

With all the planting difficulties in 2019 there are soybeans in a much greater variety of growth stages than usual this summer. What does this mean for stink bug management? First, it means that different fields will be in the danger zone at different times. Stink bugs feed on developing pods and seeds, with the potential for damage beginning in R3 and R4-R5 being prime damage time, with damage potential still lingering in early R6. Continue reading

Western Bean Cutworm: It’s Time to Scout for Egg Masses!

Results from week four of The Ohio State University Western bean cutworm (WBC) monitoring network has resulted in an increase of moths captured in the majority of Ohio counties; which means now is the time to get out and scout for egg masses.  Last week’s trap count included WBC adults captured from July 15 – July 21. A total of 26 counties monitored 79 traps across Ohio. Overall, trap counts increased, resulting in a total of 2001 WBC adults (287 total last week) and a statewide average of 25.3 moths/trap (up from 3.8 average last week) (Figure 1). A WBC statewide average of 25.3 is similar to what we observed in the WBC peak week in 2018 (25.1) (Figure 2).


Figure 1. Average Western bean cutworm adult per trap followed by total number of traps in the county in parentheses for week ending July 21, 2019
Continue reading

Gypsy Moth Adults Take Flight

By: Amy Stone, OSU Extension Lucas County

The caterpillar feeding frenzy has ended for the year and adult activity is being observed in NW Ohio. The male moths have taken flight in their zig-zag pattern in hopes of finding a mate. The female moths are white and a bit larger in size, and typically don’t move far distances from the pupal casing that they emerged from. She gives off a pheromone to alert close by males of her location. After a visit from the male moth, she will begin laying eggs. The mass of eggs laid now, will remain in that stage until the following spring, as there is one generation per year. Continue reading

Beware of Thrips on Strawberries

By: Celeste Welty, OSU Extension Specialty Crop Entomologist

Although strawberries are not considered to be a vegetable crop, using VegNet is a good way to get information out to growers who have both vegetables and berry crops.

Strawberry fruit that have been injured by thrips are a dull or bronzed color, and are often small, hard, seedy, and fail to ripen. They can cause uneven maturity of fruit. When severe, their injury can make the strawberry crop completely unmarketable.

Figure 1. Typical appearance of a thrips. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Keep Critters Out

Well where did October go? As I look at the calendar it feels like things are getting a bit hectic as we plan for Northwest Ohio Crops Day (February 8th), pesticide certification, and all of our other winter programming. Seems like the holidays will be here before we know it.

Significant progress was made in the last two weeks with regards to harvest, but with the recent and forecasted rainfall, it is looking like the remainder of harvest will be delayed for the time being. With a significant rain system heading our way and poor drying conditions it may take a while before fields are firm enough to access. This has raised some concerns over the standing corn stalk quality. Of course late harvest crop standability is largely weather dependent, however one can expect some lodging if a heavy wind come through the region. Continue reading