Asian Longhorned Tick Confirmed in Ohio

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) announced the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has confirmed that an exotic tick, known as the Asian longhorned tick, has been found in Gallia County.

The tick was found on a stray dog originating from Gallia County, which was later transported to a shelter in Canal Winchester. The tick was identified on May 28 by The Ohio State University and sent to the federal lab for confirmation.

“Due to the nature of this pest, the female ticks can reproduce without a male, so it only takes one tick to create an established population in a new location,” said Dr. Tony Forshey, ODA State Veterinarian. “This pest is especially fatal to livestock, so producers should practice preventative measures and be on the lookout for this new threat.” Continue reading

Leafhoppers, Grasshoppers, and Beetles, Oh My!

By: Kelley Tilmon and Andy Michel, OSU Extension

As the summer progresses we are receiving reports of insect problems often encouraged by hot, dry weather.  Last week we reported on spider mites and especially if you are in an area of continued dry weather we recommend scouting your soybeans and corn  https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-22/watch-spider-mites-dry-areas .

Some areas are also reporting increases in young grasshoppers in soybeans, another insect favored by dry weather.  Grasshoppers of often start on field edges so early scouting may allow for an edge treatment.  Japanese beetles are another common defoliator of soybean that are starting to appear.  Both of these pests fall into a general defoliation measurement, and we recommend treatment if defoliation is approaching 20% on the majority of plants in post-flowering beans.  Download our guide to estimating defoliation in soybean at https://aginsects.osu.edu/sites/aginsects/files/imce/Leaf%20Defoliators%20PDF_0.pd Continue reading

Watch for Spider Mites in Dry Areas

Spider mite stippling damage in soybean (bugwood.org)

By: Andy Michel and Kelley Tilmon, OSU Extension

Hot, dry weather encourages certain pests in field crops, in particular spider mites in soybean and occasionally corn.  Spider mites are a sporadic problem that most often occurs in August, but infestations in July are possible with sustained periods of hot, dry weather like some parts of Ohio are experiencing.  Crop scouts in areas that have not received rain recently should be on the lookout for this problem; spider mites are easy to miss in early stages and can build quickly.

Look for light-colored stippling damage which is easier to spot than the mites themselves.  In areas with heavy stippling you can confirm the presence of mites by tapping vegetation over a black piece of construction paper.  [Many sources will say to use white paper; but insider tip:  they are actually easier to see against a dark background].  The mites will look like specks of dust that move.

Stippling is common in the lower canopy even in non-outbreak situations.  When the stippling extends up into the middle canopy and is common, treatment is recommended.  We do not recommend edge treatments for this particular pest.  Make the decision for the whole field.  Most pyrethroid products with the exception of bifenthrin are not effective against spider mites and may even flare them.  Lorsban and generics have been popular choices against mites but may be less available now.  Check the field five days after application for resurgence because these products do not kill mite eggs.

There are specific miticide products that are particularly effective because they also kill mite eggs, eliminating the next generation.  Two such products are abamectin (Agri-Mek SC), labeled for use on soybeans, and etoxazole (Zeal), labeled for use on corn and soybeans.

A resurgence of moisture will go a long way to reducing spider mite populations.  Mites are particularly susceptible to fungal insect/mite killing pathogens which are favored by moist conditions (one of the reasons dry weather encourages mite outbreaks).

 

 

 

From Across the Field – 6/25/2020

Dealing with Landscape Pests

Had a chance to go back to southern Ohio for Father’s Day and I can report that it is just as hot and humid down there as it is here other than the have had about an inch more rain in the past month. I spent Saturday with my brother at a large farm machinery consignment sale. The used equipment market has appeared to gain some strength as things sold very well, and higher than I would have anticipated.

Here locally everyone is dealing with dry conditions. I was in a barley field where the cracks in the ground were large enough to swallow a cell phone. After a week with many calls regarding Army Worm, it appears that they are on the tail end of the caterpillar cycle. I have set Western Bean Cut Worm traps across the county and will begin monitoring the flight of adult moths this week. Continue reading

From Across the Field 6-18-2020

Bugs, Birds, Busy Days

The past week has been prime time to complete many field operations in the county and across the state. The dry weather has kept machinery in farm fields as producers side dress corn, apply pest control, and cut hay. Before long wheat harvest will be upon us as we are usually a couple weeks behind southern Ohio, where they are getting close to harvest.

We received many reports of true armyworm infestations in wheat, barley, and corn in NW Ohio. The following is from this week’s C.O.R.N. newsletter on the pest. “These are black or green caterpillars with stripes along the side and orange heads.  In the spring, true armyworm moths migrate from the south and lay eggs in grasses such as forage and weed grasses, winter wheat and barley, and rye cover crops.  When the eggs hatch, the larvae can significantly damage wheat and barley before then moving to young corn. Continue reading

True Armyworm Infestations

By:Andy MichelCurtis Young, CCAKelley Tilmon OSU Extension

We received many reports of true armyworm infestations in wheat, barley, and corn. These are black or green caterpillars with stripes along the side and orange heads.  In the spring, true armyworm moths migrate from the south and lay eggs in grasses such as forage and weed grasses, winter wheat and barley, and rye cover crops.  When the eggs hatch, the larvae can significantly damage wheat and barley before then moving to young corn. Usually, moth flights occur in April, but we may have had a second peak the first or second week of May—it’s likely the caterpillars feeding now are from this later flight. Right now, wheat, barley, and corn should be inspected for true armyworm populations. Armyworms like to hide during the day and feed at night, so scouting should occur at dusk or dawn, and/or on cloudy days. Continue reading

Alfalfa Weevil Update

By: Kelley Tilmon, Aaron Wilson, Mark Sulc, Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Andy Michel

Peak alfalfa weevil feeding damage occurs between 325 and 575 heat units (based on accumulation of heat units from January 1 with a base of 48°F).  Locations in red are there, and locations in orange are getting close.  Now is the time for most alfalfa growers to step up their alfalfa weevil scouting.  For more details on alfalfa weevil scouting and thresholds please see our April 13 article https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-09/alfalfa-weevil-%E2%80%93-it%E2%80%99s-closer-you-think

Accumulated growing degree days (base 48°F sine calculation method) for January 1-May 3*, 2020 at several CFAES Ag Weather System (https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/) locations and additional NOAA stations around Ohio.  *Ashtabula through April 30

From Across the Field: 2-19-2020

I Hate Mud

I may have mentioned before that I hate mud, and that the ideal winter is one where it is cold enough for the ground to be frozen or one with limited precipitation. Unfortunately, over the past couple of winters we really haven’t experienced either of those conditions. With regards to rainfall, we are already ahead of where we were a year ago. Continue reading

Putting Ash Wood to Good Use – Lessons from the Urban Wood Network

By: Amy Stone, OSU Extension Lucas Co.

Earlier this month, Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) hosted an online webiner entitled, “Putting Ash Wood to Good Use – Lessons from the Urban Wood Network.” While many of us from Ohio have already lived through the devastation of EAB; some may have utilized the ash, some may have not, but either way, you will enjoy the webinar presented by Don Peterson, executive director of the Urban Wood Network to learn more about what is happening in this arena across the county when it comes to urban wood utilization.

All EABU sessions are recorded and posted on the EABU You Tube Channel following the live presentation.

To check out the Urban Wood Utilization session, check out this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrksAL-mGfM&feature=youtu.be

To learn more about EABU and look at past session, or view a calendar of upcoming sessions, you can explore on the EABU webpage on the Regional Emerald Ash Borer website, http://www.emeraldashborer.info/