Low-Quality Beans Ahead

By: Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Growers should expect lower-than-average germination rates from their soybean seed next year, experts told DTN.

Much of the country’s soybean crop was plagued by unusually wet weather and a long, delayed harvest, which hurt final soybean quality despite overall high production. Continue reading

Non-Gm Soybeans Could Be Worth a Go In 2019

By: Bill Spiegel, Previously published by Successful Farming online

Seed dealers are already putting a full court press on you to choose soybean seed varieties for the 2019 crop.

Tighter margins may tempt you to follow a different path to prosperity – one in which you may choose to plant non-genetically modified soybeans. To some farmers, the notion is heresy. Seeds containing traits often have vastly improved options for weed control. But Jonathan Kleinjan, crop production Extension associate at South Dakota State University (SDSU), says farmers who choose non-GM soybean varieties may be able to save money and capture value in a specialty market that pays premiums for non-GM beans. Continue reading

Sampling for Soybean Cyst Nematode – Fall is the time!

By: Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Soybean Disease Specialist

SCN in Ohio

As we wait another week for the fields to dry out, this provides some time to sample soil for the SCN populations.  The SCN Coalition theme for the next few years is What’s your number?  Do you know where SCN is in your fields and what the current population is sitting at?  If its high, then there is a second number – what is the SCN type?  Which addresses the bigger question can it reproduce on the SCN resistance source PI 88788 or Peking.  All of these numbers can impact management of this root pathogen and future losses. Continue reading

Soybeans Vs. Corn: Which to Plant Next Year?

By: AgWeb Guest Editor
Previously published on AgWeb


Tariffs on soybeans could mean more producers will be switching to corn next year. This year, farmers planted more soybeans than corn for the first time in more than three decades, assuming it would be in high demand, but those Chinese tariffs are causing big problems. It’s leading to lowers exports and lower prices. Now, some analysts are saying farmers could convert as much as four million acres from soybeans to corn next spring. That would be roughly equal to the size of Connecticut.

 

Tips For Harvest and Planning For the 2019 Field Season

By: Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University Extension Plant Pathologist
Previously published in OSU Extension’s C.O.R.N. Newsletter

There are some things to keep track of this fall as the combines run across the soybean fields.

  • Make note of those low yield spots in soybeans to soil sample for soybean cyst nematode levels.
  • Did you leave unsprayed strips? Harvest each of these first separately. Yield is not even throughout a field so comparisons to the average of these unsprayed strips are a more accurate measure of what the baseline level of yield is within a field. This is the number to compare yields for any treatments.

Continue reading

China’s Acreage Gap

By: David Widmar, Previously Published by Agriculture Economic Insights

A significant driver of the farm economy boom was China’s surge in soybean consumption. This impacted U.S. and global markets as China relied on imports to meet domestic demand.  While we have previously examined these trends for soybeans (here and here), this week’s post considers the broad impact of China’s production and consumption trends across thirteen commodities. The results reveal a large acreage gap between China’s production and domestic consumption. Continue reading

Late-Season Pod Feeding by Bean Leaf Beetle or Grasshopper

By: Kelley Tilmon and Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension, Previously published in the C.O.R.N. Newsletter

We have heard a few reports of either bean leaf beetles or grasshoppers increasing in soybeans. As we start to approach the end of the growing season the larger concern with these insects is the potential for pod feeding, rather than foliage feeding. Pod feeding directly impacts grain quality. Crop stage is also an important consideration. Continue reading

Reminders About Dicamba

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

This is the time of year when we received our first call about dicamba problems in soybeans in 2017. We can probably expect any problems to become evident soon, based on the timing of postemergence applications and timeline for development of symptoms.

Off-target issues have already developed in states farther west and south, and we would expect at least some to occur here, unless we’re really lucky. The symptoms of dicamba injury show in new soybean growth within approximately 7 to 21 days after exposure, and most of our soybeans receive postemergence applications from early June on. Continue reading