Recommendations for Late Planted Soybeans

By: Laura Lindsay, OSU Extension Soybean Specialist

Persistent wet weather is likely to push soybean planting into late May-early June in many areas of the state. Late planting reduces the cultural practice options for row spacing, seeding rate, and relative maturity.

Row spacing. The row spacing for June planting should be 7.5 to 15-inches, if possible. Row width should be narrow enough for the soybean canopy to completely cover the interrow space by the time the soybeans begin to flower. The later in the growing season soybeans are planted, the greater the yield increase due to narrow rows. Continue reading

Switching From Alfalfa to Soybean…Should I Inoculate?

By: Laura Lindsey and Mark Sulc, Ohio State University Extension

Alfalfa stands were negatively affected by this winter’s weather. Some farmers may be converting their alfalfa fields to soybean. Does the soybean seed need to be inoculated?

While there is very little information on this topic, we believe yes. You should inoculate soybean with Rhizobia when converting an alfalfa field to soybean. Here’s why… Both alfalfa and soybean plants have a symbiotic relationship with bacteria in which the bacteria fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into a plant-available form of nitrogen. Continue reading

Looking At Barley, Double-Crop Soybeans in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle and Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators

Many growers have heard the discussions of growing winter barley in Ohio. Small-plot data is available from Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Stations, but not many field-scale data have been published.

While growing a newly reintroduced crop could be a consideration on your farm, it may not be for everyone. This article is not intended to endorse growing barley or review best management practices for growing winter barley. The intent here is to simply present the one-year, simple averages of several test fields in the upper northwest region of the state. Continue reading

Late Season Rains Impacted Seed Quality

By: Anne Dorrance and Felipe F. Sartori, Ohio State University Department of Plant Pathology

We have received many calls and samples concerning seed quality and I’ve also heard about the rejections at the elevators. I was in Florida a couple of weeks ago with my colleagues (soybean pathologists) from across the country and Ontario, Canada and we are not alone. We were not the only state where soybeans had plentiful rains through and after grain fill with some of the crop still out in the fields. Continue reading

Soybean Cyst Nematode Samples – Spring Is Still A Good Time!

By: Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Soybean Disease Specialist

Lots of news about Soybean cyst nematode at Commodity Classic a couple of weeks ago. We have continued support to run assays and education sessions for farmers throughout the region to be able to answer “What’s your number?”  There are fields throughout the Midwest, where not only are SCN numbers creeping up to economic levels but also the reproduction factor, which is the ability to reproduce on the one source of resistance (PI 88788) is also creeping up.  The good news is that adaptation to the PI 88788 type of resistance towards SCN in soybean is going to be slow – but it is happening in a couple of fields in Ohio where the number of cysts are up to 27% of the susceptible check.  Continue reading

Tracking the Pace of Soybean Consumption

By: Todd Hubbs, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois

Previously published by Farmdoc daily online

Recent developments in trade negotiations with China provided support to soybean prices and raised hopes of reducing the 910 million bushel ending stock projection for this marketing year.  The current pace of soybean consumption confirms the notion that any reduction of ending stocks lies with increased soybean exports. Continue reading

Double-Crop Soybean Yields after Barley in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle, Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators
Previously published in OSU C.O.R.N. Newsletter

Several growers across the state had the opportunity to grow winter malting barley in 2018.  We had the opportunity  to work with eight of those growers from Northwest Ohio, in particular, to learn more about the viability of growing this newly, re-introduced crop.  As a learning cohort of sorts, these growers agreed to share their yield and quality data results while participating in a simple, field-scale research project with these two objectives:

1) Determine the field-scale, simple averages for yield (grain & straw), harvest date and quality characteristics for barley grown in Northwest Ohio.

Simply put: Can we grow barley with high yield and good quality?

2) Compare the yield and plant/harvest dates for the same variety soybean as a i) first crop system, ii) double crop after barley system and iii) double crop after wheat system.

Simply put: What will the double crop soybeans yield in this barley system? Continue reading

How Many Soybean Acres Do We Need In 2019?

By: Todd HubbsDepartment of Agricultural and Consumer Economics University of Illinois
Previously published by Farmdoc Daily

We have reached the time of the year where speculation about acreage for the 2019 crops begins in earnest. While the number of acres planted to soybeans appears set to decrease, current projections indicate an intention to plant significantly more acres than necessary to reach breakeven prices in Illinois under current consumption and stock level forecasts.

Projections by industry analysts place 2019 soybean planted acreage in a range from 84.5 to 86.5 million acres. A reduction in soybean acreage from the 89.1 million acres planted in 2018 seems probable. Continue reading

Low-Quality Beans Ahead

By: Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Growers should expect lower-than-average germination rates from their soybean seed next year, experts told DTN.

Much of the country’s soybean crop was plagued by unusually wet weather and a long, delayed harvest, which hurt final soybean quality despite overall high production. Continue reading