Sorting Out the Soybean Herbicide Resistance Traits

By: Mark Loux, OSU Extension

The world of soybean herbicide resistance traits has gotten more complex over the past several years.  The good news is that we have new options for control of herbicide-resistant weeds, although it can be a little difficult to sort out which one is best for a given situation and whether the possible downsides of certain traits are tolerable.  The following is a quick rundown of what’s available and some things to consider when selecting seed.  Continue reading

Stink Bug Management In Non-Uniform Crop Stages

By: Kelley Tilmon and Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension

With all the planting difficulties in 2019 there are soybeans in a much greater variety of growth stages than usual this summer. What does this mean for stink bug management? First, it means that different fields will be in the danger zone at different times. Stink bugs feed on developing pods and seeds, with the potential for damage beginning in R3 and R4-R5 being prime damage time, with damage potential still lingering in early R6. Continue reading

Considerations for Using Soybeans as a Cover Crop

By: Laura Lindsey, OSU Extension Soybean Specialist

From the USDA RMA website (https://www.rma.usda.gov/News-Room/Frequently-Asked-Questions/Prevented-Planting-Flooding):

“Q. Can I plant a cover crop of the same crop I was prevented from planting? Or in other words, can I use the seed I have on hand (corn, soybeans, wheat) to plant a cover crop as long as it’s at a lower seeded rate that qualifies for cover crop?

  1. Yes. An acceptable cover crop must be generally recognized by agricultural experts as agronomically sound for the area for erosion control or other purposes related to conservation or soil improvement is planted at the recommended seeding rate, etc. The cover crop may be the same crop prevented from planting and may still retain eligibility for a prevented planting payment. The cover crop planted cannot be used for harvest as seed or grain.”

Soybean is an acceptable cover crop as it is agronomically sound for the area for erosion control or other purposes related to conservation or soil improvement. Continue reading

Ohio Corn, Soybean and Wheat Enterprise Budgets: Projected Returns For 2019

By Barry Ward, Ohio State University Assistant Extension Professor, Leader Production Business Management

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be largely unchanged from last year with slightly higher fertilizer and interest expenses that may increase total costs for some growers. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2019 are projected to range from $356 to $451 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2019 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $210 to $230 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2019 are projected to range from $178 to $219 per acre. Continue reading

Recommendations for Late Planted Soybeans

By: Laura Lindsay, OSU Extension Soybean Specialist

Persistent wet weather is likely to push soybean planting into late May-early June in many areas of the state. Late planting reduces the cultural practice options for row spacing, seeding rate, and relative maturity.

Row spacing. The row spacing for June planting should be 7.5 to 15-inches, if possible. Row width should be narrow enough for the soybean canopy to completely cover the interrow space by the time the soybeans begin to flower. The later in the growing season soybeans are planted, the greater the yield increase due to narrow rows. Continue reading

Switching From Alfalfa to Soybean…Should I Inoculate?

By: Laura Lindsey and Mark Sulc, Ohio State University Extension

Alfalfa stands were negatively affected by this winter’s weather. Some farmers may be converting their alfalfa fields to soybean. Does the soybean seed need to be inoculated?

While there is very little information on this topic, we believe yes. You should inoculate soybean with Rhizobia when converting an alfalfa field to soybean. Here’s why… Both alfalfa and soybean plants have a symbiotic relationship with bacteria in which the bacteria fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into a plant-available form of nitrogen. Continue reading

Looking At Barley, Double-Crop Soybeans in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle and Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators

Many growers have heard the discussions of growing winter barley in Ohio. Small-plot data is available from Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Stations, but not many field-scale data have been published.

While growing a newly reintroduced crop could be a consideration on your farm, it may not be for everyone. This article is not intended to endorse growing barley or review best management practices for growing winter barley. The intent here is to simply present the one-year, simple averages of several test fields in the upper northwest region of the state. Continue reading

Late Season Rains Impacted Seed Quality

By: Anne Dorrance and Felipe F. Sartori, Ohio State University Department of Plant Pathology

We have received many calls and samples concerning seed quality and I’ve also heard about the rejections at the elevators. I was in Florida a couple of weeks ago with my colleagues (soybean pathologists) from across the country and Ontario, Canada and we are not alone. We were not the only state where soybeans had plentiful rains through and after grain fill with some of the crop still out in the fields. Continue reading

Soybean Cyst Nematode Samples – Spring Is Still A Good Time!

By: Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Soybean Disease Specialist

Lots of news about Soybean cyst nematode at Commodity Classic a couple of weeks ago. We have continued support to run assays and education sessions for farmers throughout the region to be able to answer “What’s your number?”  There are fields throughout the Midwest, where not only are SCN numbers creeping up to economic levels but also the reproduction factor, which is the ability to reproduce on the one source of resistance (PI 88788) is also creeping up.  The good news is that adaptation to the PI 88788 type of resistance towards SCN in soybean is going to be slow – but it is happening in a couple of fields in Ohio where the number of cysts are up to 27% of the susceptible check.  Continue reading