Double-Crop Soybean Yields after Barley in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle, Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators
Previously published in OSU C.O.R.N. Newsletter

Several growers across the state had the opportunity to grow winter malting barley in 2018.  We had the opportunity  to work with eight of those growers from Northwest Ohio, in particular, to learn more about the viability of growing this newly, re-introduced crop.  As a learning cohort of sorts, these growers agreed to share their yield and quality data results while participating in a simple, field-scale research project with these two objectives:

1) Determine the field-scale, simple averages for yield (grain & straw), harvest date and quality characteristics for barley grown in Northwest Ohio.

Simply put: Can we grow barley with high yield and good quality?

2) Compare the yield and plant/harvest dates for the same variety soybean as a i) first crop system, ii) double crop after barley system and iii) double crop after wheat system.

Simply put: What will the double crop soybeans yield in this barley system? Continue reading

Ohio Fall Weed Survey Follow-Up

By: Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension Agronomic Systems Field Specialist

So I got some calls after our Extension Fall Weed Survey — if these are the problem weeds, then how do you deal with them?

It is becoming apparent that with the move to herbicide tolerant crops, we aren’t necessarily getting rid of all of our weeds — only 30% of our fields are weed free. Giant ragweed moved back into first place for worst weed, seen in 34% of fields overtaking marestail seen in 30% of fields. And then there is the pigweed problem — waterhemp appeared frequently, so did redroot pigweed and then there are the concerns about Palmer amaranth and its escape across Ohio.

 

Weed 2018 Ohio rank % of fields
Giant Ragweed 1 34
Marestail 2 30
Waterhemp 6 10
Redroot pigweed 10 5

Continue reading

Be Informed About 2019 Dicamba Requirements

By: Ohio Ag Net Staff, previously published by Ohio Ag Net

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is reminding farmers of revised labels and new training requirements for applicators who intend to use dicamba herbicide products this year. In October 2018, U.S. EPA approved revised labels for the three dicamba products that are labeled for use on soybeans: Engenia (BASF), XtendiMax (Monsanto) and FeXapan (DuPont).

“Like any other product, we want to ensure licensed applicators are properly following label directions as they get ready for this growing season,” said Matt Beal, chief of the ODA Division of Plant Health. “This not only helps ensure the safe use of pesticides, it also helps prevent misuse and mishandling.” Continue reading

Extensive Spread of Corn Toxin Could Affect 2019 Crop

By: Ohio Ag Net Staff. Previously published by Ohio Ag Net

A wetter than normal summer and fall in Ohio led to the worst spread of a toxin on corn in at least a decade, according to a grain disease expert with The Ohio State University.

And next year’s crop may be at risk as well. The fungus that produces the toxin can survive the winter, particularly if stalks or other plant material from the 2018 corn crop are left on the surface of the soil, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension specialist in corn and small grain diseases.

Ear Rots of Corn

Continue reading

2018 eFields Research Report Available

By: Elizabeth Hawkins, John Fulton, Jenna Lee, OSU Extension
Previously published in OSU Extension C.O.R.N. newsletter

High quality, relevant information is key to making the right management decisions for your farm. The eFields program at The Ohio State University was created to provide local information about critical issues for Ohio agriculture. The 2018 eFields Research Report highlighting 95 on-farm, field scale trials conducted in 25 Ohio counties was released on Jan. 9. Research topics include nutrient management, precision seeding, crop management, soil compaction management, remote sensing, and data analysis and management. To help identify trial locations that are similar to your operation, each study includes information about weather, soil types, and management practices. Additionally, economic analysis was added to select trials this year. QR codes that link to videos featuring the researchers and partner farmers are available in the report. Continue reading

Corn Producers Benefit from Red Meat Exports

By: U.S. Meat Export Federation 

The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) has received the results of an updated study aimed at quantifying the value delivered to U.S. corn producers through exports of red meat. The original 2016 study, as well as the 2018 follow-up, were conducted by World Perspectives, Inc. (WPI), a leading agricultural consulting firm.

The original study, titled The Intersection of U.S. Meat Exports and Domestic Corn Use, concluded that in 2015 exports of U.S. red meat accounted for 11.7 million tons of combined corn and Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) use. In its update, WPI concluded that 2018 beef and pork exports will use a combined total of 14.9 million tons of corn and DDGS, which equates to an additional 459.7 million bushels of corn produced – an increase of 29 percent over the 2015 projections.  Continue reading

2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test: Regional Overviews

By: Rich Minyo, Allen Geyer, David Lohnes, and Peter Thomison

In 2018, 192 corn hybrids representing 24 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide). Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments. Continue reading

Low-Quality Beans Ahead

By: Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Growers should expect lower-than-average germination rates from their soybean seed next year, experts told DTN.

Much of the country’s soybean crop was plagued by unusually wet weather and a long, delayed harvest, which hurt final soybean quality despite overall high production. Continue reading

Non-Gm Soybeans Could Be Worth a Go In 2019

By: Bill Spiegel, Previously published by Successful Farming online

Seed dealers are already putting a full court press on you to choose soybean seed varieties for the 2019 crop.

Tighter margins may tempt you to follow a different path to prosperity – one in which you may choose to plant non-genetically modified soybeans. To some farmers, the notion is heresy. Seeds containing traits often have vastly improved options for weed control. But Jonathan Kleinjan, crop production Extension associate at South Dakota State University (SDSU), says farmers who choose non-GM soybean varieties may be able to save money and capture value in a specialty market that pays premiums for non-GM beans. Continue reading