Concerns With Continuous Soybeans in 2018

By: Matt Reese, Ohio Ag Net

With the likelihood of 2018 farm economics again favoring soybean production, soybeans being planted after soybeans could be on the rise this spring.

With consecutive years of soybean production, yield potential declines and the potential need for additional inputs and precautions increases. Continue reading

“Plant As Much Corn As You Want, Don’t Expect to Make Money”

By: Ashley Davenport, Farm Journal Broadcast Multimedia Editor

In 1983 for the first time, planted soybean acres surpassed corn acres by 3.5 million acres. Some market analysts thought 2017 would be another year this would happen, but it didn’t.

There have been some rumblings that because of current corn prices, 2018 could be the year where King Corn has its crown knocked off and replaced with another crop: soybeans.

Continue reading

From Across the Field – That Time of Year

Meeting season is here and based on what I have heard from folks regarding programming needs in the county, I think we have a good line up of programs this winter, and I hope to see you at one or more of them. From our flagship program, Northwest Ohio Crops Day to Pesticide Applicator Training we have been hard at work planning and preparing here in the office.

Speaking of Northwest Ohio Crops Day, time is running out to RSVP for the event on February 9th at the Bavarian Haus. Be sure to register by February 1st for the discounted rate, registration includes a light breakfast, lunch, and information packet. We have a great group of vendors, exhibitors, exhibitors and speakers lined up for the day, so be sure to come on down to Deshler and learn what you need to know going into the 2018 crop year. Continue reading

Dicamba Training Opportunities

By: Matt Reese, Ohio’s Country Journal/Ohio Ag Net

For those planning on planting dicamba tolerant crops next year, there is plenty of change coming in 2018 compared to last year.

The label requirements for spraying will be much different and training is being required for applicators.

“The new labels for Engenia, XtendiMax, and FeXapan have many new precautions that applicators need to be aware of,” said Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist. “An additional requirement is that anyone applying these products must attend an annual dicamba or group 4 herbicide-specific training.” Continue reading

Sidedressing Manure Into Corn Continues to Have Promising Results

Glen Arnold, OSU Extension Field Specialist Manure Nutrient Management

Ohio State University Extension has conducted manure research on growing crops for several years in an effort to make better use of the available nutrients. Incorporating manure into growing corn can boost crop yields, reduce nutrient losses, and give livestock producers or commercial manure applicators another window of time to apply manure to farm fields. Continue reading

From Across the Field – A January Thaw

The thermometer has warmed up (relatively speaking) here in NW Ohio over the past couple of days, which is a welcome sight for many.  The recent cold snap was a bit rough on the office, as I think we have all battled a cold since the start of the new year. I had the pleasure of thawing out some pipes in my basement, as did many others as it appears, based on the scarcity of heat lamp bulbs at the store. The forecast for the end of this week and into the weekend is a mix of good and bad, as the welcome warmer temperatures look to bring with them a dose of snow, rain, or a wintery mix.

Looking back while fairly short lived, this recent blast of Arctic air, brought some of the colder temperatures that I can remember. My parents and grandparent talk about the blizzard of 1978, but was long before my time. However, a couple of other cold spells do stick out in my mind. I was in college during the Polar Vortex of 2014, where even Ohio State had a couple of snow days. Columbus drivers are bad enough on dry pavement, let alone on ice skates. Continue reading

Ohio Annual Crop Summary for 2017

From Ohio Ag Net/Ohio’s Country Journal

Crop conditions varied widely across the state, due to delays in planting, replanting, and emergence issues throughout the 2017 season, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Heavy rains along with cold temperatures at the beginning of the season hindered the drying of fields and caused the need for significant replanting. Dryer conditions in June brought opportunities to dry out fields to resume planting and other field activities. The dry weather continued allowing growers to catch up on replanting, apply fertilizer and cut hay. Excessive moisture throughout July created concerns in crop progress. August brought cooler drier conditions which helped stabilize crops.

Ohio’s 2017 average corn yield was 177 bushels per acre, a new State record, up 18 bushels from last year. Producers harvested 3.13 million acres, compared to 3.30 million acres in 2016. Total State production of corn for grain was 554 million bushels, up 6 percent from the 2016 production of 525 million bushels. Acreage harvested for silage was 220,000 acres, an increase of 10,000 acres from 2016. The average silage yield increased by 4.5 tons from 2016 to 20 tons per acre. The Ohio corn harvest progressed slightly behind 2016 throughout the fall and was near completion by the end of November. Continue reading

How Did the Soybean Become Such a Common Crop in The U.S.?

By: Anna Casey

Chris Murray is a fifth-generation farmer in Champaign County, Illinois.  Like most farmers in the heartland, he grows both corn and soybeans, but says it was a particularly good year for the bean.

“We’re still probably going to be in one of our top five best soybean years we’ve ever had,” Murray said.

Farmers in the U.S. grew more soybeans in 2017 than ever before, according to USDA data. Nearly 89.5 million acres were planted this year, an increase of more than 25 million acres over the last decade.  The plant, native to Asia, has become ubiquitous across the American Corn Belt, but the crop was virtually unknown to the region until the middle of the 20th century. And the soybean’s rise can be traced back to one enterprising Illinois industrialist, A.E. Staley. Continue reading

N Prices on the Rise

By: Russ Quinn
DTN Staff Reporter

OMAHA (DTN) — The recent rise in anhydrous prices comes as a big lump of coal in farmers’ stockings right at the holiday season. With already tight crop margins, higher anhydrous prices were not on any farmer’s Christmas list.

The average retail price of anhydrous was $461 per ton the third week of December 2017, up 12% from $410 the third week of November 2017, according to retailers surveyed by DTN. Continue reading