Local Agronomic Insect Trapping Report 7-10

For the week of 6/24-6/30. No traps at the economic threshold for treatment for Western Bean Cutworm (WBC), European Corn Borer (ECB), or Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

WBC:

Freedom – 9
Monroe – 0
Pleasant -0
Bartlow – 2
NWARS – 0

ECB:

Freedom – 2
Bartlow – 0

BMSB:

Flatrock – 0 male; 0 female; 0 nymphs

 

 

Reminders About Dicamba

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

This is the time of year when we received our first call about dicamba problems in soybeans in 2017. We can probably expect any problems to become evident soon, based on the timing of postemergence applications and timeline for development of symptoms.

Off-target issues have already developed in states farther west and south, and we would expect at least some to occur here, unless we’re really lucky. The symptoms of dicamba injury show in new soybean growth within approximately 7 to 21 days after exposure, and most of our soybeans receive postemergence applications from early June on. Continue reading

Brown Spot and Frogeye: Know The Difference

By: Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist.

Frogeye Leaf Spot in Soybeans. Photo by OSU Extension

As farmers and consultants have been out checking their soybean stands, they are finding spots on the leaves. The most common spotting on the unifoliates and first leaves is caused by Septoria glycines. This is a fungus that overwinters on the previous soybean crop residue and in modern cultivars it is limited to the lower canopy. Continue reading

SDS Threat Higher in Early Planted Soybeans

By: Sonja Begemann, Farm Journal Seeds and Crop Production Editor
Previously on Farm Journal Online

While sudden death syndrome (SDS) doesn’t appear until early reproductive stages, the fungus infects the plant in early stages. This season is ripe for high infestation as a record-cold April could encourage fungal spores that survive in the soil to germinate.

Researchers first discovered this tricky disease 45 years ago in Arkansas. It claims the No. 2 spot—just behind soybean cyst nematode—for yield loss. While research continues working to contain and control this disease, understand your risk is likely higher this year. Continue reading

Top 5 Sustainable Soybean Production Practices

By: Max Glover, Guest Commentator for AgWeb

Top 5 Sustainable Soybean Production Practices

Yes, we love the ag technology at our fingertips today. But every now and then we need to go back to the basics. Max Glover, agronomy specialist with the University of Missouri Extension, hits on five sustainable management practices that are the foundation of creating a viable soybean yield.

#1 Improve Drainage and Water-Holding Capacity Continue reading

Concerns With Continuous Soybeans in 2018

By: Matt Reese, Ohio Ag Net

With the likelihood of 2018 farm economics again favoring soybean production, soybeans being planted after soybeans could be on the rise this spring.

With consecutive years of soybean production, yield potential declines and the potential need for additional inputs and precautions increases. Continue reading

How Did the Soybean Become Such a Common Crop in The U.S.?

By: Anna Casey

Chris Murray is a fifth-generation farmer in Champaign County, Illinois.  Like most farmers in the heartland, he grows both corn and soybeans, but says it was a particularly good year for the bean.

“We’re still probably going to be in one of our top five best soybean years we’ve ever had,” Murray said.

Farmers in the U.S. grew more soybeans in 2017 than ever before, according to USDA data. Nearly 89.5 million acres were planted this year, an increase of more than 25 million acres over the last decade.  The plant, native to Asia, has become ubiquitous across the American Corn Belt, but the crop was virtually unknown to the region until the middle of the 20th century. And the soybean’s rise can be traced back to one enterprising Illinois industrialist, A.E. Staley. Continue reading

Dicamba Restrictions Added

After statewide bans, multiple lawsuits and countless disgruntled farmers nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has required the makers of dicamba, a controversial weed killer, to revise its label.

The label changes and new training requirements shift more responsibility into the hands of farmers to ensure if they apply dicamba, the herbicide does not spread to neighboring fields. The problem is the weed killer has been shown to easily go airborne and move far from its intended area, harming or killing plants and other crops along the way. Continue reading

Are Soybeans Responsive to Nitrogen Fertilizer?

By Laura Lindsey, Ohio State University Extension

Soybean plants have a high demand for nitrogen as soybean grain contains a large amount of protein. An 80-bushel per acre soybean crop requires approximately 302 pounds of N per acre. As soybean yield increases, many farmers question if nitrogen supplied through fixation and the soil is adequate to maximize yield. Continue reading

What Will Dicamba Changes Mean For Farmers?

By Peggy Kirk Hall, Asst. Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law and Ellen Essman, Law Fellow, Ohio State University

This fall, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced an agreement with Monsanto, BASF and DuPont to change dicamba registration and labeling beginning with the 2018 growing season. EPA reports that the agreement was a voluntary measure taken by the manufacturers to minimize the potential of dicamba drift from “over the top” applications on genetically engineered soybeans and cotton, a recurring problem that has led to a host of regulatory and litigation issues across the Midwest and South. The upcoming changes might alleviate dicamba drift issues, but they also raise new concerns for farmers who will have more responsibility for dicamba applications. Continue reading