Recommendations for Late Planted Soybeans

By: Laura Lindsay, OSU Extension Soybean Specialist

Persistent wet weather is likely to push soybean planting into late May-early June in many areas of the state. Late planting reduces the cultural practice options for row spacing, seeding rate, and relative maturity.

Row spacing. The row spacing for June planting should be 7.5 to 15-inches, if possible. Row width should be narrow enough for the soybean canopy to completely cover the interrow space by the time the soybeans begin to flower. The later in the growing season soybeans are planted, the greater the yield increase due to narrow rows. Continue reading

Late Season Rains Impacted Seed Quality

By: Anne Dorrance and Felipe F. Sartori, Ohio State University Department of Plant Pathology

We have received many calls and samples concerning seed quality and I’ve also heard about the rejections at the elevators. I was in Florida a couple of weeks ago with my colleagues (soybean pathologists) from across the country and Ontario, Canada and we are not alone. We were not the only state where soybeans had plentiful rains through and after grain fill with some of the crop still out in the fields. Continue reading

Soybean Cyst Nematode Samples – Spring Is Still A Good Time!

By: Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Soybean Disease Specialist

Lots of news about Soybean cyst nematode at Commodity Classic a couple of weeks ago. We have continued support to run assays and education sessions for farmers throughout the region to be able to answer “What’s your number?”  There are fields throughout the Midwest, where not only are SCN numbers creeping up to economic levels but also the reproduction factor, which is the ability to reproduce on the one source of resistance (PI 88788) is also creeping up.  The good news is that adaptation to the PI 88788 type of resistance towards SCN in soybean is going to be slow – but it is happening in a couple of fields in Ohio where the number of cysts are up to 27% of the susceptible check.  Continue reading

Low-Quality Beans Ahead

By: Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Growers should expect lower-than-average germination rates from their soybean seed next year, experts told DTN.

Much of the country’s soybean crop was plagued by unusually wet weather and a long, delayed harvest, which hurt final soybean quality despite overall high production. Continue reading

Non-Gm Soybeans Could Be Worth a Go In 2019

By: Bill Spiegel, Previously published by Successful Farming online

Seed dealers are already putting a full court press on you to choose soybean seed varieties for the 2019 crop.

Tighter margins may tempt you to follow a different path to prosperity – one in which you may choose to plant non-genetically modified soybeans. To some farmers, the notion is heresy. Seeds containing traits often have vastly improved options for weed control. But Jonathan Kleinjan, crop production Extension associate at South Dakota State University (SDSU), says farmers who choose non-GM soybean varieties may be able to save money and capture value in a specialty market that pays premiums for non-GM beans. Continue reading

Sampling for Soybean Cyst Nematode – Fall is the time!

By: Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Soybean Disease Specialist

SCN in Ohio

As we wait another week for the fields to dry out, this provides some time to sample soil for the SCN populations.  The SCN Coalition theme for the next few years is What’s your number?  Do you know where SCN is in your fields and what the current population is sitting at?  If its high, then there is a second number – what is the SCN type?  Which addresses the bigger question can it reproduce on the SCN resistance source PI 88788 or Peking.  All of these numbers can impact management of this root pathogen and future losses. Continue reading

Local Agronomic Insect Trapping Report 7-10

For the week of 6/24-6/30. No traps at the economic threshold for treatment for Western Bean Cutworm (WBC), European Corn Borer (ECB), or Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

WBC:

Freedom – 9
Monroe – 0
Pleasant -0
Bartlow – 2
NWARS – 0

ECB:

Freedom – 2
Bartlow – 0

BMSB:

Flatrock – 0 male; 0 female; 0 nymphs

 

 

Reminders About Dicamba

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

This is the time of year when we received our first call about dicamba problems in soybeans in 2017. We can probably expect any problems to become evident soon, based on the timing of postemergence applications and timeline for development of symptoms.

Off-target issues have already developed in states farther west and south, and we would expect at least some to occur here, unless we’re really lucky. The symptoms of dicamba injury show in new soybean growth within approximately 7 to 21 days after exposure, and most of our soybeans receive postemergence applications from early June on. Continue reading

Brown Spot and Frogeye: Know The Difference

By: Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist.

Frogeye Leaf Spot in Soybeans. Photo by OSU Extension

As farmers and consultants have been out checking their soybean stands, they are finding spots on the leaves. The most common spotting on the unifoliates and first leaves is caused by Septoria glycines. This is a fungus that overwinters on the previous soybean crop residue and in modern cultivars it is limited to the lower canopy. Continue reading

SDS Threat Higher in Early Planted Soybeans

By: Sonja Begemann, Farm Journal Seeds and Crop Production Editor
Previously on Farm Journal Online

While sudden death syndrome (SDS) doesn’t appear until early reproductive stages, the fungus infects the plant in early stages. This season is ripe for high infestation as a record-cold April could encourage fungal spores that survive in the soil to germinate.

Researchers first discovered this tricky disease 45 years ago in Arkansas. It claims the No. 2 spot—just behind soybean cyst nematode—for yield loss. While research continues working to contain and control this disease, understand your risk is likely higher this year. Continue reading