Former “Billion Dollar Bug” is Mounting a Come Back

By: Sonja Begemann, Farm Journal Seeds and Crop Production Editor
Published previously on AgWeb Daily

One billion dollars. Prior to Bt technologies farmers lost $1 billion annually to corn rootworm—in the form of chemical costs or actual yield loss. With resistance to traits that once killed the pest on the rise, it might just nibble its way back to a billion-dollar price tag.

Corn rootworm (CRW) poses a double threat—the adult snips corn silks, and if unchecked could prevent successful pollination and kernel development, and the larvae munch on roots which leads to risk for disease and plant stress. CRW was once controlled by traits but with resistance on the rise is now at risk of running rampant: it’s time to find a solution to slow the spread of resistance. Continue reading

Late Planting Corn Considerations

By: Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension

With some “late” planting some folks are concerned already about whether or not we might be caught by a fall frost before maturity without a change in maturity selection. Not to worry. The corn plant has the ability to adapt to the later planting by advancing more rapidly through the growth stages. Continue reading

Hybrid Switching Decisions

By: Dave Huff, NuTech Seed Agronomist, Eastern Product Specialist
Previously on Ohio Ag Net

With a late start for some and corn fields not yet planted throughout the region, growers are asking, “Do I need to be switching to earlier maturing corn varieties?” and “Should I replant problem fields?”

It seems like each year I need to address these questions. We learned in the past that corn requires fewer Growing Degree Units (GDUs) to mature when planted after May 1 than listed in product brochures. From my own research trials and University trial data, we can expect corn planted in our region to require on average around 6.8 fewer GDUs to mature for every day of delay beyond May 1. Another way to interpret this is that it would require approximately 200 fewer GDUs from May 1 planting versus June 1 planting to reach black layer. Continue reading

Adjusting Corn Management Practices for a Late Start

By: Steve Culman and Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension

As prospects for a timely start to spring planting diminish, growers need to reassess their planting strategies and consider adjustments. Since delayed planting reduces the yield potential of corn, the foremost attention should be given to management practices that will expedite crop establishment. The following are some suggestions and guidelines to consider in dealing with a late planting season. Continue reading

Proven Production Practices for Increasing Corn Yields and Profits

By: Peter ThomisonSteve Culman, OSU Extension State Specialists

In the quest for high corn yields, considerable attention has been given to increasing various inputs, including seeding rates and fertilizers, narrowing row spacing, and making preventative applications of foliar fungicides, growth regulators and biological stimulants. However, the significant drop in crop net returns that’s occurred in recent years warrants developing strategies to lower input costs. An input that might have paid for itself with $5.50/bu corn may not at $3.75/bu corn. A practical and economic approach to achieving high yields is to follow proven cultural practices that enhance corn performance. Continue reading

“Plant As Much Corn As You Want, Don’t Expect to Make Money”

By: Ashley Davenport, Farm Journal Broadcast Multimedia Editor

In 1983 for the first time, planted soybean acres surpassed corn acres by 3.5 million acres. Some market analysts thought 2017 would be another year this would happen, but it didn’t.

There have been some rumblings that because of current corn prices, 2018 could be the year where King Corn has its crown knocked off and replaced with another crop: soybeans.

Continue reading

Sidedressing Manure Into Corn Continues to Have Promising Results

Glen Arnold, OSU Extension Field Specialist Manure Nutrient Management

Ohio State University Extension has conducted manure research on growing crops for several years in an effort to make better use of the available nutrients. Incorporating manure into growing corn can boost crop yields, reduce nutrient losses, and give livestock producers or commercial manure applicators another window of time to apply manure to farm fields. Continue reading

USGC Rolls Out 2017/2018 Corn Harvest Quality Report

By AgWeb Guest Editor

An excellent growing season resulted in record yields and good quality for the 2017 corn crop, according to the U.S. Grain Council’s (USGC’s) latest corn quality report, released recently.

The 2017/2018 Corn Harvest Quality Report is the seventh in the Council’s annual corn quality survey. The report revealed that the majority of 2017 corn crop conditions were rated as good or excellent during the growing season, leading to strong plant health, good kernel size and a projected record yield of 370.3 million metric tons (14.58 billion bushels), the second-largest crop on record. Continue reading

2017 Ohio Corn Performance Test Preliminary Results Now Available On-Line

Results from the 2017 Ohio Corn Performance Test are now available on line at: http://oardc.osu.edu/corntrials

Single and multi-year agronomic data is currently available for all sites and regions for 2017. The results can be accessed by following the links on the left side of the page. Information regarding the growing season, evaluation procedures and traits will be available soon. Additional hybrids will be added as soon as marketing information becomes available, as will the combined regional tables (which are especially helpful in assessing hybrid performance across locations).