Extensive Spread of Corn Toxin Could Affect 2019 Crop

By: Ohio Ag Net Staff. Previously published by Ohio Ag Net

A wetter than normal summer and fall in Ohio led to the worst spread of a toxin on corn in at least a decade, according to a grain disease expert with The Ohio State University.

And next year’s crop may be at risk as well. The fungus that produces the toxin can survive the winter, particularly if stalks or other plant material from the 2018 corn crop are left on the surface of the soil, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension specialist in corn and small grain diseases.

Ear Rots of Corn

Continue reading

Corn Producers Benefit from Red Meat Exports

By: U.S. Meat Export Federation 

The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) has received the results of an updated study aimed at quantifying the value delivered to U.S. corn producers through exports of red meat. The original 2016 study, as well as the 2018 follow-up, were conducted by World Perspectives, Inc. (WPI), a leading agricultural consulting firm.

The original study, titled The Intersection of U.S. Meat Exports and Domestic Corn Use, concluded that in 2015 exports of U.S. red meat accounted for 11.7 million tons of combined corn and Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) use. In its update, WPI concluded that 2018 beef and pork exports will use a combined total of 14.9 million tons of corn and DDGS, which equates to an additional 459.7 million bushels of corn produced – an increase of 29 percent over the 2015 projections.  Continue reading

2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test: Regional Overviews

By: Rich Minyo, Allen Geyer, David Lohnes, and Peter Thomison

In 2018, 192 corn hybrids representing 24 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide). Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments. Continue reading

Drying Costs Versus Stalk Loss—Which Costs More?

By: Sonja Begemann, Farm Journal Seed and Crop Production Editor, Previously published on AgWeb Daily

As fields inch toward harvest Mother Nature isn’t letting up. Downpour after downpour brought on by hurricane Gordon is leading to questionable stalk and shanks in corn fields.

With stalks and shanks threatening to break, are you prepared to harvest early? Does it make economic sense? Scout fields, weigh drying costs and remember, every bushel you leave in the field is potential dollars out of your pocket. Continue reading

Stress During Corn Reproductive Stages a Concern

By: Roy Ulrich, Technical Agronomist for Dekalb/Asgrow, previously published on Ohio Ag Net

The growing season has been quite variable across the region this year so far. For some regions of Ohio, the start to the growing season may have been slightly delayed, but once it was fit the crop went in relatively fast and stress free. For other regions, the growing season was extremely late to get started and each management step has been a struggle to accomplish between all the rains. Continue reading

Foliar Fungicide Use in Corn

ByPierce Paul, OSU Extension Corn and Small Grains Disease Specialist

Foliar diseases, especially Gray Leaf Spot (GLS), are beginning to show up in some corn fields. This is not at all surprising, given that the crop was planted relatively late and it has been wet and humid in some areas. GLS is favored by humid conditions, particularly if temperatures are between 70 and 90 F. Foliar diseases of corn are generally a concern when they develop early and progress up the plant before grain fill is complete Continue reading

Ponding and Corn

By Peter Thomison and Alexander Lindsey, Ohio State University Extension

Persistent rains during the past two weeks have resulted in ponding and saturated soils in many Ohio corn fields and led to questions concerning what impact these conditions will have on corn performance.

The extent to which ponding injures corn is determined by several factors including: (1) plant stage of development when ponding occurs, (2) duration of ponding and (3) air/soil temperatures. Continue reading

Former “Billion Dollar Bug” is Mounting a Come Back

By: Sonja Begemann, Farm Journal Seeds and Crop Production Editor
Published previously on AgWeb Daily

One billion dollars. Prior to Bt technologies farmers lost $1 billion annually to corn rootworm—in the form of chemical costs or actual yield loss. With resistance to traits that once killed the pest on the rise, it might just nibble its way back to a billion-dollar price tag.

Corn rootworm (CRW) poses a double threat—the adult snips corn silks, and if unchecked could prevent successful pollination and kernel development, and the larvae munch on roots which leads to risk for disease and plant stress. CRW was once controlled by traits but with resistance on the rise is now at risk of running rampant: it’s time to find a solution to slow the spread of resistance. Continue reading

Late Planting Corn Considerations

By: Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension

With some “late” planting some folks are concerned already about whether or not we might be caught by a fall frost before maturity without a change in maturity selection. Not to worry. The corn plant has the ability to adapt to the later planting by advancing more rapidly through the growth stages. Continue reading

Hybrid Switching Decisions

By: Dave Huff, NuTech Seed Agronomist, Eastern Product Specialist
Previously on Ohio Ag Net

With a late start for some and corn fields not yet planted throughout the region, growers are asking, “Do I need to be switching to earlier maturing corn varieties?” and “Should I replant problem fields?”

It seems like each year I need to address these questions. We learned in the past that corn requires fewer Growing Degree Units (GDUs) to mature when planted after May 1 than listed in product brochures. From my own research trials and University trial data, we can expect corn planted in our region to require on average around 6.8 fewer GDUs to mature for every day of delay beyond May 1. Another way to interpret this is that it would require approximately 200 fewer GDUs from May 1 planting versus June 1 planting to reach black layer. Continue reading