Safe Driving During Harvest Season

By: Dee Jepsen – State Agricultural Safety and Health Leader
Previously published in OSU S.T.A.T Newsletter

As tractors, combines, and grain trucks begin to appear on Ohio roads, roadway safety becomes a focus for all who share the road with farm machinery.

Vehicle collisions can happen at any time. Many are a result of speed differential between slower-moving farm equipment and passenger vehicles, where the motoring public doesn’t slow down in time before colliding with machinery. Continue reading

Preventing Barn Fires

By: Christine Gelley – OSU Extension, Noble County Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

The fire department is a service you hope you will never need to use, but the one you are most thankful for when an emergency occurs and life as you know it is going up in flames. It is crucial that we all do our best to reduce fire risks in our homes and work environments. Continue reading

Who Can Work on Your Farm?

By: Emily G. Adams, Ohio State University Extension Educator, Coshocton County, Ohio
Previously published by Ohio Ag Net

The 2018 hay baling season has arrived and, for some farms, that means more labor than usual is required to get all the jobs done. That labor may include your own children or grandchildren. Today we’ll take a look at what the law allows and also consider what types of jobs kids are capable of handling from a developmental standpoint.

One great reference to guide these considerations are “Youth on the Farm: What Type of Farm Work Can They Perform” by Peggy Hall and Catherine Daniels in the OSU Agricultural and Resource Law Program. Another very helpful publication is Penn State Extension’s “Children and Safety on the Farm.” Continue reading

Lyme Disease Myths and Tips for Prevention

By: Kristin Rose, previously published by Farm Journal’s Pork online

Lyme disease is now the most reported vector-borne disease in the United States and the CDC released a report showing that diseases from biting insects, ticks, and mosquitoes in the U.S. have tripled since 2004.

Brandon Jutras, a Lyme disease researcher in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, says, “Warming temperatures are playing an important role in this increase. Ticks not readily killed due to warmer winters, are coming out earlier in the season and spreading to more northern areas. Another factor likely playing a role in the increase is public and physician awareness.” Continue reading

Who Can Work on Your Farm

By: Emily G. Adams –  Ohio State University Extension Educator, Coshocton County, Ohio

It won’t be long until hay season will be upon us. For some farms that means more labor than usual is required to get all the jobs done. That labor may include your own children or grandchildren. Today we’ll take a look at what the law allows and also consider what types of jobs kids are capable of handling from a developmental standpoint.

One great reference to guide these considerations are “Youth on the Farm: What Type of Farm Work Can They Perform” by Peggy Hall and Catherine Daniels in the OSU Agricultural and Resource Law Program. Another very helpful publication is Penn State Extension’s “Children and Safety on the Farm.” Continue reading

Safety With Hand and Power Tools

By: Kent McGuire, OSU Ag Safety and Health Coordinator

It’s time to start those projects or repairs that need to be completed in preparation for the spring busy season. Most of these projects will involve the use of hand or power tools. Common injuries associated with hand and power tools include cuts, burns, blunt trauma, or flying debris, as well as health hazards associated from dust, or fumes. Below are safety considerations when working with hand and power tools. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Keeping Safe and Warm this Winter

It has been a frigid start to 2018 across much of the country, with temperatures hovering around zero here in our corner of the Buckeye State. That being said, it if often a hazardous time for both people and pets once temperatures drop.

Managing the cold weather for our pets can become a challenge. If possible allow them to seek shelter in a barn, garage, or consider bring them into the home if house trained. At the very least we should provide some insulation to them in there pen or box. Straw makes a good winter insulation for multiple species, both pets and farm animals alike. Continue reading

Make Skid Steer Safety A Priority For All

By: Sara Brown, Farm Journal
Livestock and Production Editor

Safety on the farm is a year-round worry. And livestock operations often carry the most risk—with humans and livestock—so much so that equipment companies are making an effort to promote equipment safety with livestock producers.

“Most accidents happen from trips and falls. That’s why we have safety steps—to prevent those accidents from happening,” says Craig Reidhead, training services representative at the Empire dealership in Mesa, Ariz.

The second most common cause of skid-steer accidents is operator error. “Any time you make direction changes, ease into a stop before going forward or reverse. You don’t want to operate this machine without putting on a safety belt, either,” adds Tony Newlin, who also works at the Empire dealership in Mesa. Continue reading

Reduce the Risk of a Combine Fire

Author(s):
Rory Lewandowski, CCA
Previously printed in C.O.R.N. Newsletter

I have seen several photos and even some video clips of harvest 2017 combine fires come across my twitter feed. On our recent CORN newsletter conference call, several Extension Educators mentioned seeing or hearing about combine fires in the past week. Crop residue accumulation near a direct heat source such as the engine or exhaust system, or on and around bearings, belts and chains where heat can be generated, accounts for the majority of combine fires. Continue reading