From Across the Field – Thinking Ahead

Thank goodness the ice held off long enough for us to have a great turnout for the 2019 edition of Northwest Ohio Crops Day. We had right at 100 total attendees, an increase from last year. I certainly appreciate the support of both vendors and producers who helped make the event the success as we continue to improve the quality of service and improve the knowledge base of producers in the area. Go ahead mark the Friday of the first full week in February for next year’s event. Continue reading

Is AI Worth the Effort?

By: John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator (originally published in the Ohio Farmer on-line)

Artificial insemination (A.I.) in beef cattle is not a new technology as it has been available to producers for several decades. Nearly every cow-calf producer in this country has some degree of awareness of this management practice. While there is a relatively high degree of awareness amongst producers of A.I., misconceptions still exist about the value of this useful tool.

The use of artificial insemination offers several obvious advantages over natural service sires. Some of these advantages include: Continue reading

Understanding The New Food Nutrition Labels

Previously published by Ohio Farmer online

One of the biggest changes in the new food nutrition label is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read.

In 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the updated food nutrition label design. According to the FDA, the new design was part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make more informed decisions about food choices and maintaining healthy diets.

NEW LOOK: Here’s a comparison of the old and new food nutrition labels. (Courtesy of U.S. Food and Drug Administration)

Continue reading

OSU Looks At Options to Apply Manure When It’s Rained A Lot

Previously published by Ohio Farmer online

Throughout the growing season, and particularly this fall, there were a lot of rainfalls — off and on. Not only did fields fill up with water, but manure ponds and lagoons did also, and that might make some farmers a bit nervous.

Ohio had the third-wettest year ever in 2018, and there’s been little letup since then, leaving farm fields across the state saturated. For farmers with a lot of livestock, spreading manure onto wet or frozen land as fertilizer is not an option right now, and manure ponds are filling up fast. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Thinking Ahead

With all of the rain we have had, yards, hay fields, and pastures may need re-seeded in areas that have been torn up. There is a method called “frost seeding” where you apply seed to the ground and the freezing and thawing of the soil in February and early March will provide seed to soil contact allowing germination of the seed. There is a little more risk of the seed not germinating than a traditional seeding, but the cost and time is a lot less.  Continue reading

Lake Erie Bill of Rights Issue To Go To Toledo Voters

By Ellen Essman, Sr. Research Associate, Ohio State University Agricultural & Resource Law Program

The Ohio Supreme Court recently decided that a “Lake Erie Bill of Rights” initiative could be placed before Toledo residents in a special election Feb. 26, 2019. The Lake Erie Bill of Rights (LEBOR) is a proposed amendment to the Toledo City Charter. Josh Abernathy, an opponent to the initiative, brought the lawsuit, seeking a “writ of prohibition”— meaning he wanted the Ohio Supreme Court to determine that the Lucas County Board of Elections must remove LEBOR from the special election ballot. Continue reading

Double-Crop Soybean Yields after Barley in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle, Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators
Previously published in OSU C.O.R.N. Newsletter

Several growers across the state had the opportunity to grow winter malting barley in 2018.  We had the opportunity  to work with eight of those growers from Northwest Ohio, in particular, to learn more about the viability of growing this newly, re-introduced crop.  As a learning cohort of sorts, these growers agreed to share their yield and quality data results while participating in a simple, field-scale research project with these two objectives:

1) Determine the field-scale, simple averages for yield (grain & straw), harvest date and quality characteristics for barley grown in Northwest Ohio.

Simply put: Can we grow barley with high yield and good quality?

2) Compare the yield and plant/harvest dates for the same variety soybean as a i) first crop system, ii) double crop after barley system and iii) double crop after wheat system.

Simply put: What will the double crop soybeans yield in this barley system? Continue reading

There Are Viable Strategies for Transitioning the Farm

By: Robert Moore, Attorney, Wright & Moore
Previously published by the Ohio Farmer

Each family farm facing a succession to the next generation must come up with a strategy to transfer ownership. Depending on the situation, it can be challenging to transfer ownership that does not trigger taxes, cause financial stress or cause financial discomfort for the family. There are several strategies that can be implemented to bring the next generation into the farming operation. Continue reading

Mastitis in Sheep and Goats

Michael Metzger, Michigan State University Extension Educator
(Previously published on MSU Extension, Sheep & Goat: January 3, 2019)

Mastitis is an important disease of sheep and goats because it decreases the amount and quality of the milk produced by a dairy animal and reduces weight gain in lambs and meat kids. It can also affect the animals well-being. Mastitis is an inflammation of udder.Physical injury, stress, or bacteria can cause mastitis. There are several bacteria which are known to cause mastitis in sheep and goats including Streptococcus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Pasteurella sp., and coliforms, such as E. coli. The exact type of bacteria that is causing the mastitis can only be determined by laboratory analysis. Mastitis can either be clinical or subclinical. Clots or serum in the milk are signs of clinical mastitis. In addition the udder may become swollen, hot and/or tender to the touch. Continue reading