From Across the Field – Grain Marketing Education

Another cold and somewhat soggy week continues to delay the remainder of harvest here across much of the state. Hopefully everyone had a safe and successful deer hunting week. Back in the Southeastern corner of the state where I grew up, we always had that first day of deer gun season off from school. Someone a long time ago realized they might as well cancel classes for the day, as attendance was poor at best. Over the weekend I even made an attempt at Christmas shopping, which ranks extremely low on my list of things that have to be done. Continue reading

A Look Back at the U.S. Hay Market Over the Last 100 Years

By: Carl Zulauf, The Ohio State University

Hay is the 3rd largest U.S. crop in terms of harvest acres.  It also provides environmental services, notably erosion control.  Understanding the U.S. hay market is therefore important for both market and policy reasons.  This article examines the U.S. hay market since 1919, or when the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistical Service began to report data separately for alfalfa hay. Continue reading

Low-Quality Beans Ahead

By: Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Growers should expect lower-than-average germination rates from their soybean seed next year, experts told DTN.

Much of the country’s soybean crop was plagued by unusually wet weather and a long, delayed harvest, which hurt final soybean quality despite overall high production. Continue reading

Non-Gm Soybeans Could Be Worth a Go In 2019

By: Bill Spiegel, Previously published by Successful Farming online

Seed dealers are already putting a full court press on you to choose soybean seed varieties for the 2019 crop.

Tighter margins may tempt you to follow a different path to prosperity – one in which you may choose to plant non-genetically modified soybeans. To some farmers, the notion is heresy. Seeds containing traits often have vastly improved options for weed control. But Jonathan Kleinjan, crop production Extension associate at South Dakota State University (SDSU), says farmers who choose non-GM soybean varieties may be able to save money and capture value in a specialty market that pays premiums for non-GM beans. Continue reading

Select Beef Will Be Phased Out

By: Greg Henderson, for Drovers online

Select grade beef will soon become a small niche product. That’s the conclusion of a new White Paper “Phasing Out Select Grade Beef,” published by the Red Angus Association of America with sponsorship from Anipro/Xtraformance Feeds.

The authors noted that as recently as 2006-2007, Select grade beef accounted for 40% of carcasses, but was reduced to 17% to 18% by 2018. Extending the current downward trend into the future, the authors suggest Select beef tonnage would be reduced to 10% by 2022, and to 5% by 2025. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Holiday Safety Tips

Hopefully everyone had a nice Thanksgiving weekend. I certainly enjoyed spending time with family on the farm, and watching the Buckeyes put a spanking on TTUN. Back home everyone is fighting the mud when it comes to finishing harvest and feeding livestock. We currently have about 55 head of cattle on pasture, thankfully we can feed them all out of the mud on a concrete lot near a barn. At my brother’s house we are having some of our “early” season lambs. There is not near as much mud around the sheep, however the soft ground sure does make it tough to haul manure. Continue reading

Net Farm Income Expected to Drop 12% This Year, USDA Says

By: Tony Dreibus, Successful Farming

Net farm income, a gauge of profits, is expected to drop 12% year-over-year in 2018 amid low crop prices and rising expenses, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said in a report on Friday.

Profits are pegged at $66.3 billion this year, down from $75.4 billion in 2017, according to the USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS). Adjusted for inflation, the decline will be 14%. Continue reading

2018 Ohio NoTIll Conference December 11

The annual Ohio NoTill Conference will be held on December 11, 2018 at the Der Dutchman Restaurant in Plain City, Ohio.  The program starts at 9 am – 4 pm.  Cost is $40.  To register and prepay go to https://ohionotillcouncil.com/

Topics include: Nutrient Application in NoTill;  Carbon, Nitrogen, Phosphorus Cycle; Deep Placement of Fertilizer with Strip-till; Cover Crops- It’s All About Timing; Conservation Benefits for Landowners; Digital Ag Apps; and more.

Basic Ventilation System Design for Producers

By Joe Darrington, South Dakota State University Extension

Within swine production barns, the management and mastery of ventilation systems can be viewed as both a science and an art. As the days change throughout the year, the ventilation requirements at barns also shift. The challenge lies in balancing the indoor environmental conditions with the varying needs of the pigs. Continue reading