Cautious Optimism on CWD

By: John Maday. (Originally published by Drovers online).

Since Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) first emerged in captive deer in Colorado in the 1960s, the prion disease has spread to at least 26 states, three Canadian provinces and several countries in Europe. While the fatal disease continues to spread, fears that it could cross species barriers to affect livestock or humans have, so far, not come to fruition.

Results of a long-term exposure trial, reported in 2018 in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, for example, support the belief that the lethal prion disease is highly unlikely to spread to cattle. Continue reading

Putting Ash Wood to Good Use – Lessons from the Urban Wood Network

By: Amy Stone, OSU Extension Lucas Co.

Earlier this month, Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) hosted an online webiner entitled, “Putting Ash Wood to Good Use – Lessons from the Urban Wood Network.” While many of us from Ohio have already lived through the devastation of EAB; some may have utilized the ash, some may have not, but either way, you will enjoy the webinar presented by Don Peterson, executive director of the Urban Wood Network to learn more about what is happening in this arena across the county when it comes to urban wood utilization.

All EABU sessions are recorded and posted on the EABU You Tube Channel following the live presentation.

To check out the Urban Wood Utilization session, check out this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrksAL-mGfM&feature=youtu.be

To learn more about EABU and look at past session, or view a calendar of upcoming sessions, you can explore on the EABU webpage on the Regional Emerald Ash Borer website, http://www.emeraldashborer.info/

The National Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program Scores a “Win”

By: Joe Boggs, OSU Extension

Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) (Anoplophora glabripennis) is potentially the most devastating non-native pest to have ever arrived in North America.  The beetle kills trees belonging to 12 genera in 9 plant families.  This includes Acer (all maple species); Aesculus (horsechestnuts and buckeyes); Ulmus (elms); Salix (willows); Betula (birches); Platanus (Sycamore/Planetrees); Populus (Poplars); Albizia (Mimosa); Cercidiphyllum (Katsura); Fraxinus (ashes); Koelreuteria (goldenraintree); and Sorbus (mountainash). Continue reading

/From Across the Field – On Pause 9/18/2019

Typically, this time of year farmers are gearing up for harvest, instead this year we are playing a bit of a waiting game. One bit of evidence to support that thought is that we sold more tickets for Farm Science Review this year than in the last two combined. Other than some hay baling being finished up and specialty crops being harvested we are looking well into October before there will be much action in the way of corn or soybean harvest. Continue reading

WOTUS Repealed, Will Get ‘Redefined,’ EPA Says

By: Rhonda Brooks (previously published by Farm Journal’s Pork online)

On Thursday, a 2015 rule that expanded the definition of “waters of the United States” (WOTUS) under the Clean Water Act was formally revoked.

“Let’s just call it what it was, an example of the worst kind of regulatory overreach,” said U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), of the Obama-era WOTUS rule, during the announcement.

“Repealing the rule is a major win for American agriculture,” noted U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, in remarks he made at the presentation. “Farmers and ranchers are exceptional stewards of the land, taking great care to preserve it for generations to come. President Trump is making good on his promise to reduce burdensome regulations to free our producers,” he added. Continue reading

Solar Leasing Guide Available

By: Peggy Kirk Hall
Source: https://farmoffice.osu.edu/blog
Large “utility-scale” solar energy development is on the rise in Ohio.  In the past two years, the Ohio Power Siting Board has approved six large scale solar projects with generating capacities of 50MW or more, and three more projects are pending approval.   These “solar farms” require a large land base, and in Ohio that land base is predominantly farmland.   The nine solar energy facilities noted on this map will cover about 16,500 acres in Brown, Clermont, Hardin, Highland and Vinton counties.  About 12,300 of those acres were previously used for agriculture.

Continue reading

Gypsy Moth Adults Take Flight

By: Amy Stone, OSU Extension Lucas County

The caterpillar feeding frenzy has ended for the year and adult activity is being observed in NW Ohio. The male moths have taken flight in their zig-zag pattern in hopes of finding a mate. The female moths are white and a bit larger in size, and typically don’t move far distances from the pupal casing that they emerged from. She gives off a pheromone to alert close by males of her location. After a visit from the male moth, she will begin laying eggs. The mass of eggs laid now, will remain in that stage until the following spring, as there is one generation per year. Continue reading

New Beech Tree Disease Could Cost Ohio Millions

By: Misti Crane, Ohio State Assistant Director of Research Communications

A confounding new disease is killing beech trees in Ohio and elsewhere, and plant scientists are sounding an alarm while looking for an explanation.

In a study published in the journal Forest Pathology, researchers and naturalists from Ohio State University and metro parks in northeastern Ohio reported on the emerging beech leaf disease epidemic, calling for speedy work to find a culprit so that work can begin to stop its spread. Continue reading

USDA Announces Sign-Up Period for Updated Conservation Stewardship Program

Source: USDA

The next deadline for Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) applications to be considered for funding this year is May 10, 2019. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) plans to invest up to $700 million for new enrollments and contract extensions in fiscal year 2019. The 2018 Farm Bill made several changes to this critical conservation program, which helps agricultural producers take the conservation activities on their farm or ranch to the next level. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Winter is Here

Just as I wrote last week about the weather being fairly warm, Mother Nature decided to drop some snow across the state this past weekend. On Saturday I attended the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association annual meeting and banquet held just north of Columbus. The banquet adjourned around 8:00 p.m. and then it was like an episode of Ice Road Truckers coming back to Napoleon. It’s not that the roads we too poor of shape, I was more concerned about the lack of driving skill in the snow demonstrated by other drivers on the road (tends to be a recurring theme the more I have to drive to Columbus).

As part of the OCA annual meeting, faculty from the Department of Animal Sciences presented a nice update on beef research happening across the state at the research stations. Their topics focused on fixed time artificial insemination and embryo transfer, feedlot nutrition, and weaning strategies that minimize calf stress. Some of these topics will be covered here in Napoleon during our 2019 Beef School in late March and into April on Monday evenings. Continue reading