From Across the Field – April Showers

Everyone knows the saying “April showers bring May flowers.” As I wrote last week I think we can amend that old adage to say “April showers bring May planted corn.” Jim Noel from the National Weather Service suggested that change as he predicts a wetter than average April followed by a drier May in this week’s C.O.R.N. newsletter. As a reminder the Crop Observation Reporting Network newsletter comes our weekly during the growing season and can be found at corn.osu.edu. Continue reading

Ohio’s 2018 County Yields Now Available

By: Bruce Clevenger, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

The 2018 Ohio county estimates for crop yields were recently published by the USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service. This annual report provides a look back to the previous production year and give an average of planted and harvested acres as well as the county yield in bushels per acre and a total estimated production for the county. The report additionally groups counties into nine reporting districts and provides an overall state yield estimate for corn and soybean. Ohio county estimates for the 2018 wheat crop were released back in December of 2018. Continue reading

From Across the Field – New “Normal”

March came in like a lion, and went out just the same. Who would have thought we’d be talking snow going into April, especially after a fairly nice week? That brings to question, what does a “normal” spring looks like? Going into what will be my third planting season here in Henry County, the normal I know has been by in large wet and cool. Continue reading

Looking At Barley, Double-Crop Soybeans in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle and Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators

Many growers have heard the discussions of growing winter barley in Ohio. Small-plot data is available from Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Stations, but not many field-scale data have been published.

While growing a newly reintroduced crop could be a consideration on your farm, it may not be for everyone. This article is not intended to endorse growing barley or review best management practices for growing winter barley. The intent here is to simply present the one-year, simple averages of several test fields in the upper northwest region of the state. Continue reading

Nitrogen Application Timing for Weak Wheat Stands

By: Ed Lentz, OSU Extension

Late-planted wheat fields had little opportunity for growth before cold and wet conditions moved into the area last November. Fall tiller production was limited because of early cold weather soon after planting. In addition, some wheat stands have been damaged this winter from lack of snow cover, standing water, saturated soils, ice sheets, and days of very cold temperatures. Continue reading

Double-Crop Soybean Yields after Barley in Northwest Ohio

By: Eric Richer CCA, Sarah Noggle, Garth Ruff, OSU Extension Educators
Previously published in OSU C.O.R.N. Newsletter

Several growers across the state had the opportunity to grow winter malting barley in 2018.  We had the opportunity  to work with eight of those growers from Northwest Ohio, in particular, to learn more about the viability of growing this newly, re-introduced crop.  As a learning cohort of sorts, these growers agreed to share their yield and quality data results while participating in a simple, field-scale research project with these two objectives:

1) Determine the field-scale, simple averages for yield (grain & straw), harvest date and quality characteristics for barley grown in Northwest Ohio.

Simply put: Can we grow barley with high yield and good quality?

2) Compare the yield and plant/harvest dates for the same variety soybean as a i) first crop system, ii) double crop after barley system and iii) double crop after wheat system.

Simply put: What will the double crop soybeans yield in this barley system? Continue reading

Ohio Fall Weed Survey Follow-Up

By: Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension Agronomic Systems Field Specialist

So I got some calls after our Extension Fall Weed Survey — if these are the problem weeds, then how do you deal with them?

It is becoming apparent that with the move to herbicide tolerant crops, we aren’t necessarily getting rid of all of our weeds — only 30% of our fields are weed free. Giant ragweed moved back into first place for worst weed, seen in 34% of fields overtaking marestail seen in 30% of fields. And then there is the pigweed problem — waterhemp appeared frequently, so did redroot pigweed and then there are the concerns about Palmer amaranth and its escape across Ohio.

 

Weed 2018 Ohio rank % of fields
Giant Ragweed 1 34
Marestail 2 30
Waterhemp 6 10
Redroot pigweed 10 5

Continue reading

From Across the Field – New Year, New Changes

As with every changing of the calendar, come changes as to how farmers are asked (or required) to implement certain production practices. This year, 2019 is no different. One of those major changes will affect producers who are planning to use dicamba based herbicides this growing season. The revised label for those products no longer allows for the applicator to be a trained person under direct supervision of a pesticide license holder, rather the person making the application must now be a licensed applicator themselves. For those needing to obt Continue reading

2018 eFields Research Report Available

By: Elizabeth Hawkins, John Fulton, Jenna Lee, OSU Extension
Previously published in OSU Extension C.O.R.N. newsletter

High quality, relevant information is key to making the right management decisions for your farm. The eFields program at The Ohio State University was created to provide local information about critical issues for Ohio agriculture. The 2018 eFields Research Report highlighting 95 on-farm, field scale trials conducted in 25 Ohio counties was released on Jan. 9. Research topics include nutrient management, precision seeding, crop management, soil compaction management, remote sensing, and data analysis and management. To help identify trial locations that are similar to your operation, each study includes information about weather, soil types, and management practices. Additionally, economic analysis was added to select trials this year. QR codes that link to videos featuring the researchers and partner farmers are available in the report. Continue reading