From Across the Field – New Year’s Checklist

Happy New Year. I had the opportunity to spend some quality time with friends and family in Morgan County before gearing up for our busy Extension meeting season. While I was in southern Ohio it was tough to do much farm work with all of the mud. On New Year’s Eve, 2018 became the wettest year on record according to the Columbus news stations. One thing we were able to accomplish, was cutting and splitting a couple of cords of firewood for my brother. It was splitting wood that reminded me this is a good time to check a couple of things around the house, now that the calendar has turned.

This is the time of the year when fuel-burning devices are at peak utilization, along with that come the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas that can cause sudden illness and death. The Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of State Fire Marshal, warns of following devices that may produce dangerous levels of CO gas: fuel fired furnaces (non-electric); gas water heaters; generators; fireplaces and wood stoves; gas stoves; non-electric space heaters; gas dryers; charcoal grills; and motorized automobiles and equipment. Continue reading

Is Your Livestock Barn At Risk For A Fire? Here’s A Safety Checklist

By: Sara Brown, previously published by Farm Journal’s Pork

It seems there have been more livestock barn fires in 2018 than years prior, according to coverage on Agweb.com and sister publications Farm Journal’s PORKDrovers and Dairy Herd Management.

While wildfires are nearly impossible to prepare for, stationary livestock barns can be modified to lower the risk of fire. During winter months, it’s even more important that farmers inspect livestock facilities before installing additional heaters and inspect electrical wiring for damage.

The National Fire Protection Association and Iowa State University offers these tips to lower fire hazards on the farm: Continue reading

From Across the Field – Merry Christmas

I hope everyone had a nice weekend and is just about ready for next week. I do want to let the farmers know that we have the 2018 Farmers Tax guides and IRS tax forms available at the Extension office at no charge as the year is coming to a close. We also have a supply of various account books available as well. It is hard to believe the year is coming to a close but 2019 is just around the corner. As I wrap up my first full year here in Henry County it has certainly been a pleasure to live and work in the area and I am excited to see what 2019 has in store. Continue reading

Safe Driving During Harvest Season

By: Dee Jepsen – State Agricultural Safety and Health Leader
Previously published in OSU S.T.A.T Newsletter

As tractors, combines, and grain trucks begin to appear on Ohio roads, roadway safety becomes a focus for all who share the road with farm machinery.

Vehicle collisions can happen at any time. Many are a result of speed differential between slower-moving farm equipment and passenger vehicles, where the motoring public doesn’t slow down in time before colliding with machinery. Continue reading

Preparation of Grain Bins for Storage of Corn and Soybeans

By: Curtis Young, CCA, OSU Extension Educator Van Wert County
Previously published in OSU Extension’s C.O.R.N Newsletter

Empty Bin Treatments for Grain Bins for Storage of Corn, Popcorn and Soybeans

First – before using any product to treat grain bins, always read the most current label for the product to assure that the product is used correctly.  This is for the protection of the grain to be stored in the bin as well as for the protection of the applicator of the product.  Continue reading

Use Caution When Canning this Fall

Previously Published in Ohio’s Country Journal

While it’s a wonderful, cherished tradition in many families to preserve food based on recipes that were developed and honed over the years in grandma’s, great-grandma’s and great-great-grandma’s kitchens, recipes should be reviewed, and if they don’t match recipes that have been tested and researched by food safety experts, they shouldn’t be used. Continue reading

Preventing Barn Fires

By: Christine Gelley – OSU Extension, Noble County Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

The fire department is a service you hope you will never need to use, but the one you are most thankful for when an emergency occurs and life as you know it is going up in flames. It is crucial that we all do our best to reduce fire risks in our homes and work environments. Continue reading

Who Can Work on Your Farm?

By: Emily G. Adams, Ohio State University Extension Educator, Coshocton County, Ohio
Previously published by Ohio Ag Net

The 2018 hay baling season has arrived and, for some farms, that means more labor than usual is required to get all the jobs done. That labor may include your own children or grandchildren. Today we’ll take a look at what the law allows and also consider what types of jobs kids are capable of handling from a developmental standpoint.

One great reference to guide these considerations are “Youth on the Farm: What Type of Farm Work Can They Perform” by Peggy Hall and Catherine Daniels in the OSU Agricultural and Resource Law Program. Another very helpful publication is Penn State Extension’s “Children and Safety on the Farm.” Continue reading

Lyme Disease Myths and Tips for Prevention

By: Kristin Rose, previously published by Farm Journal’s Pork online

Lyme disease is now the most reported vector-borne disease in the United States and the CDC released a report showing that diseases from biting insects, ticks, and mosquitoes in the U.S. have tripled since 2004.

Brandon Jutras, a Lyme disease researcher in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, says, “Warming temperatures are playing an important role in this increase. Ticks not readily killed due to warmer winters, are coming out earlier in the season and spreading to more northern areas. Another factor likely playing a role in the increase is public and physician awareness.” Continue reading

Who Can Work on Your Farm

By: Emily G. Adams –  Ohio State University Extension Educator, Coshocton County, Ohio

It won’t be long until hay season will be upon us. For some farms that means more labor than usual is required to get all the jobs done. That labor may include your own children or grandchildren. Today we’ll take a look at what the law allows and also consider what types of jobs kids are capable of handling from a developmental standpoint.

One great reference to guide these considerations are “Youth on the Farm: What Type of Farm Work Can They Perform” by Peggy Hall and Catherine Daniels in the OSU Agricultural and Resource Law Program. Another very helpful publication is Penn State Extension’s “Children and Safety on the Farm.” Continue reading