Safe Driving During Harvest Season

By: Dee Jepsen – State Agricultural Safety and Health Leader
Previously published in OSU S.T.A.T Newsletter

As tractors, combines, and grain trucks begin to appear on Ohio roads, roadway safety becomes a focus for all who share the road with farm machinery.

Vehicle collisions can happen at any time. Many are a result of speed differential between slower-moving farm equipment and passenger vehicles, where the motoring public doesn’t slow down in time before colliding with machinery. Continue reading

Preparation of Grain Bins for Storage of Corn and Soybeans

By: Curtis Young, CCA, OSU Extension Educator Van Wert County
Previously published in OSU Extension’s C.O.R.N Newsletter

Empty Bin Treatments for Grain Bins for Storage of Corn, Popcorn and Soybeans

First – before using any product to treat grain bins, always read the most current label for the product to assure that the product is used correctly.  This is for the protection of the grain to be stored in the bin as well as for the protection of the applicator of the product.  Continue reading

Use Caution When Canning this Fall

Previously Published in Ohio’s Country Journal

While it’s a wonderful, cherished tradition in many families to preserve food based on recipes that were developed and honed over the years in grandma’s, great-grandma’s and great-great-grandma’s kitchens, recipes should be reviewed, and if they don’t match recipes that have been tested and researched by food safety experts, they shouldn’t be used. Continue reading

Preventing Barn Fires

By: Christine Gelley – OSU Extension, Noble County Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

The fire department is a service you hope you will never need to use, but the one you are most thankful for when an emergency occurs and life as you know it is going up in flames. It is crucial that we all do our best to reduce fire risks in our homes and work environments. Continue reading

Who Can Work on Your Farm?

By: Emily G. Adams, Ohio State University Extension Educator, Coshocton County, Ohio
Previously published by Ohio Ag Net

The 2018 hay baling season has arrived and, for some farms, that means more labor than usual is required to get all the jobs done. That labor may include your own children or grandchildren. Today we’ll take a look at what the law allows and also consider what types of jobs kids are capable of handling from a developmental standpoint.

One great reference to guide these considerations are “Youth on the Farm: What Type of Farm Work Can They Perform” by Peggy Hall and Catherine Daniels in the OSU Agricultural and Resource Law Program. Another very helpful publication is Penn State Extension’s “Children and Safety on the Farm.” Continue reading

Lyme Disease Myths and Tips for Prevention

By: Kristin Rose, previously published by Farm Journal’s Pork online

Lyme disease is now the most reported vector-borne disease in the United States and the CDC released a report showing that diseases from biting insects, ticks, and mosquitoes in the U.S. have tripled since 2004.

Brandon Jutras, a Lyme disease researcher in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, says, “Warming temperatures are playing an important role in this increase. Ticks not readily killed due to warmer winters, are coming out earlier in the season and spreading to more northern areas. Another factor likely playing a role in the increase is public and physician awareness.” Continue reading

Who Can Work on Your Farm

By: Emily G. Adams –  Ohio State University Extension Educator, Coshocton County, Ohio

It won’t be long until hay season will be upon us. For some farms that means more labor than usual is required to get all the jobs done. That labor may include your own children or grandchildren. Today we’ll take a look at what the law allows and also consider what types of jobs kids are capable of handling from a developmental standpoint.

One great reference to guide these considerations are “Youth on the Farm: What Type of Farm Work Can They Perform” by Peggy Hall and Catherine Daniels in the OSU Agricultural and Resource Law Program. Another very helpful publication is Penn State Extension’s “Children and Safety on the Farm.” Continue reading

From Across the Field – Road Safety with Farm Machinery

When I sit down to write an article or column, typically I have an idea of what I would like to say or accomplish, given a current topic or problem. This week was not one of those times as it tough to get excited about 30-degree weather in April or tariffs that may or may not happen on agricultural goods.

With the cold wet weather, it looks like May is going to be a busy month for farmers in the fields. That being said this is an opportune time to consider road and highway safety for the coming growing season. Fred Whitford, Ag Safety Specialist from Purdue University suggests farmer follow these guidelines. Continue reading

Safety With Hand and Power Tools

By: Kent McGuire, OSU Ag Safety and Health Coordinator

It’s time to start those projects or repairs that need to be completed in preparation for the spring busy season. Most of these projects will involve the use of hand or power tools. Common injuries associated with hand and power tools include cuts, burns, blunt trauma, or flying debris, as well as health hazards associated from dust, or fumes. Below are safety considerations when working with hand and power tools. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Keeping Safe and Warm this Winter

It has been a frigid start to 2018 across much of the country, with temperatures hovering around zero here in our corner of the Buckeye State. That being said, it if often a hazardous time for both people and pets once temperatures drop.

Managing the cold weather for our pets can become a challenge. If possible allow them to seek shelter in a barn, garage, or consider bring them into the home if house trained. At the very least we should provide some insulation to them in there pen or box. Straw makes a good winter insulation for multiple species, both pets and farm animals alike. Continue reading