Estimating Yield Losses in Stressed Corn Fields

By: Peter Thomison, OSU Extension

Many corn fields are still silking (and some are just past the mid-vegetative stages)….so, it may seem a little early to discuss estimating grain yields. However, according to the most recent  NASS crop report, for the week ending Aug. 8, 2019,  25% of the corn crop has reached the dough stage (compared to 63% for the 5 year average). Corn growers with drought damaged fields and late plantings may want to estimate grain yields prior to harvest in order to help with marketing and harvest plans. Two procedures that are widely used for estimating corn grain yields prior to harvest are the YIELD COMPONENT METHOD (also referred to as the “slide rule” or corn yield calculator) and the EAR WEIGHT METHOD. Continue reading

Drought and Heat Stress

By: Peter Thomison, OSU Extension

One of the corn production scenarios agronomists least like is an exceptionally wet spring followed by a hotter and drier than normal July and August. The spring of 2019 was one the wettest on records throughout much of the state and now, as the dry weather that started in July persists, such a scenario seems to be a possibility in many Ohio corn fields. A combination of warm temperatures and inadequate rainfall is beginning to stress corn fields across Ohio. Continue reading

Western Bean Cutworm: It’s Time to Scout for Egg Masses!

Results from week four of The Ohio State University Western bean cutworm (WBC) monitoring network has resulted in an increase of moths captured in the majority of Ohio counties; which means now is the time to get out and scout for egg masses.  Last week’s trap count included WBC adults captured from July 15 – July 21. A total of 26 counties monitored 79 traps across Ohio. Overall, trap counts increased, resulting in a total of 2001 WBC adults (287 total last week) and a statewide average of 25.3 moths/trap (up from 3.8 average last week) (Figure 1). A WBC statewide average of 25.3 is similar to what we observed in the WBC peak week in 2018 (25.1) (Figure 2).


Figure 1. Average Western bean cutworm adult per trap followed by total number of traps in the county in parentheses for week ending July 21, 2019
Continue reading

Ponding and Saturated Soils: Results of Recent Ohio Corn Research

By: Alexander Lindsey and Peter Thomison, Ohio state University Extension

Persistent rains during May and early June have resulted in ponding and saturated soils in many Ohio corn fields and led to questions concerning what impact these conditions will have on corn performance.

The extent to which ponding injures corn is determined by several factors including (1) plant stage of development when ponding occurs, (2) duration of ponding and (3) air/soil temperatures. Continue reading

The Implications of Late Planting for the 2019/20 Corn Balance Sheet

By: Todd Hubbs and Scott Irwin, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois. farmDoc Daily

USDA’s release of the Crop Progress report on May 20 showed corn planting at 49 percent nationally.  The planting progress in numerous major corn producing states lags behind historical averages significantly.  The implications for corn acreage and yield are potentially large in 2019.  The purpose of this article is to explore the implications of late planting on corn acreage and yield and investigate the consequences for the corn balance sheet in the 2019-20 marketing year.

Acreage Implications Continue reading

Ohio Corn, Soybean and Wheat Enterprise Budgets: Projected Returns For 2019

By Barry Ward, Ohio State University Assistant Extension Professor, Leader Production Business Management

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be largely unchanged from last year with slightly higher fertilizer and interest expenses that may increase total costs for some growers. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2019 are projected to range from $356 to $451 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2019 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $210 to $230 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2019 are projected to range from $178 to $219 per acre. Continue reading

How Late is Too Late for Corn?

By: Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension CCA

As I write this it is obvious that the majority of the corn crop this year will be planted after May 20. I sat last Thursday with a grower from Miami County. We figured the days it takes him to dry out, then to plant first corn and then soybeans and determined that at least some of his crop will be planted into June no matter what. Yields are likely to be reduced. Continue reading

Will Planting Delays Require Switching Corn Hybrid Maturities?

By: Peter Thomison, OSU Extension Corn Specialist

According to the USDA/NASS, for the week ending May 5, only 2% of Ohio’s projected corn acreage was planted – compared to 20% last year and 27% for the five-year average. Persistent rains and saturated soil conditions have delayed corn planting. The weather forecast this week indicates the likelihood of more rain so it is probable that many soggy fields may not be drying out soon.

Given this outlook, is there a need to switch from full season to shorter season hybrids? Probably not. In most situations, full season hybrids will perform satisfactorily (i.e. will achieve physiological maturity or “black layer” before a killing frost) even when planted as late as May 25, if not later, in some regions of the state. Continue reading

Here We Go Again: How Many Days Does It Take to Plant the U.S. Corn Crop?

By: Scott Irwin and Todd Hubbs, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics,University of Illinois

USDA’s release of the March Prospective Planting report indicated an increase in planted acreage for corn in 2019.  At 92.8 million acres, the report shows approximately 3.7 million additional acres of corn planted to be planted compared to last year.  Given the large acreage, corn planting progress in 2019 will once again merit considerable interest.  This is compounded by cold and wet conditions over large areas of the Corn Belt that have delayed early planting.  The potential for more significant planting delays or acreage adjustments depends on the rate that corn planting can proceed once the weather improves. Continue reading

Managing Nitrogen for Corn in 2019

By: Emerson Nafziger, Department of Crop Sciences University of Illinois, farmdoc Daily

The fall of 2018 and so far in 2019, there have been limited opportunities to apply nitrogen fertilizer. Average rainfall through the first 25 days of March ranged from a little less than normal in the northern half of Illinois to an inch or more above normal in south-central Illinois. But temperatures have averaged 3 to 4 degrees below normal, which slowed drying. There were several days in the first week of March when it was frozen on the surface and a considerable amount of P and K went on. Continue reading