Will Planting Delays Require Switching Corn Hybrid Maturities?

By: Peter Thomison, OSU Extension Corn Specialist

According to the USDA/NASS, for the week ending May 5, only 2% of Ohio’s projected corn acreage was planted – compared to 20% last year and 27% for the five-year average. Persistent rains and saturated soil conditions have delayed corn planting. The weather forecast this week indicates the likelihood of more rain so it is probable that many soggy fields may not be drying out soon.

Given this outlook, is there a need to switch from full season to shorter season hybrids? Probably not. In most situations, full season hybrids will perform satisfactorily (i.e. will achieve physiological maturity or “black layer” before a killing frost) even when planted as late as May 25, if not later, in some regions of the state. Continue reading

Here We Go Again: How Many Days Does It Take to Plant the U.S. Corn Crop?

By: Scott Irwin and Todd Hubbs, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics,University of Illinois

USDA’s release of the March Prospective Planting report indicated an increase in planted acreage for corn in 2019.  At 92.8 million acres, the report shows approximately 3.7 million additional acres of corn planted to be planted compared to last year.  Given the large acreage, corn planting progress in 2019 will once again merit considerable interest.  This is compounded by cold and wet conditions over large areas of the Corn Belt that have delayed early planting.  The potential for more significant planting delays or acreage adjustments depends on the rate that corn planting can proceed once the weather improves. Continue reading

Managing Nitrogen for Corn in 2019

By: Emerson Nafziger, Department of Crop Sciences University of Illinois, farmdoc Daily

The fall of 2018 and so far in 2019, there have been limited opportunities to apply nitrogen fertilizer. Average rainfall through the first 25 days of March ranged from a little less than normal in the northern half of Illinois to an inch or more above normal in south-central Illinois. But temperatures have averaged 3 to 4 degrees below normal, which slowed drying. There were several days in the first week of March when it was frozen on the surface and a considerable amount of P and K went on. Continue reading

Extensive Spread of Corn Toxin Could Affect 2019 Crop

By: Ohio Ag Net Staff. Previously published by Ohio Ag Net

A wetter than normal summer and fall in Ohio led to the worst spread of a toxin on corn in at least a decade, according to a grain disease expert with The Ohio State University.

And next year’s crop may be at risk as well. The fungus that produces the toxin can survive the winter, particularly if stalks or other plant material from the 2018 corn crop are left on the surface of the soil, said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension specialist in corn and small grain diseases.

Ear Rots of Corn

Continue reading

Corn Producers Benefit from Red Meat Exports

By: U.S. Meat Export Federation 

The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) has received the results of an updated study aimed at quantifying the value delivered to U.S. corn producers through exports of red meat. The original 2016 study, as well as the 2018 follow-up, were conducted by World Perspectives, Inc. (WPI), a leading agricultural consulting firm.

The original study, titled The Intersection of U.S. Meat Exports and Domestic Corn Use, concluded that in 2015 exports of U.S. red meat accounted for 11.7 million tons of combined corn and Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) use. In its update, WPI concluded that 2018 beef and pork exports will use a combined total of 14.9 million tons of corn and DDGS, which equates to an additional 459.7 million bushels of corn produced – an increase of 29 percent over the 2015 projections.  Continue reading

2018 Ohio Corn Performance Test: Regional Overviews

By: Rich Minyo, Allen Geyer, David Lohnes, and Peter Thomison

In 2018, 192 corn hybrids representing 24 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide). Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments. Continue reading

Soybeans Vs. Corn: Which to Plant Next Year?

By: AgWeb Guest Editor
Previously published on AgWeb


Tariffs on soybeans could mean more producers will be switching to corn next year. This year, farmers planted more soybeans than corn for the first time in more than three decades, assuming it would be in high demand, but those Chinese tariffs are causing big problems. It’s leading to lowers exports and lower prices. Now, some analysts are saying farmers could convert as much as four million acres from soybeans to corn next spring. That would be roughly equal to the size of Connecticut.

 

6 Pointers to Maintain, Adjust Corn Heads to Minimize Harvest Losses

By: Dave Mowitz
Previously published by Successful Farming

Corn head checkpoints.

Closer attention to combine settings and improvements in threshing and separation technology has worked wonders in minimizing grain losses in the combine. Dennis Bollig warns that corn heads contribute enormously to grain losses, however, citing an Iowa State University study that estimates 60% of all losses happen now at the corn head. Continue reading

Syngenta Corn Seed Settlement Claims Due Oct. 12

By: Peggy Kirk Hall, Associate Professor and Director, OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program

Those post cards advising producers of a $1.51 billion settlement in the Syngenta corn seed lawsuits are legitimate, and corn producers seeking compensation from the settlement must file claims by 11:59 p.m. on October 12, 2018. The settlement is the result of class action and individual lawsuits alleging that Syngenta failed to receive import approval from China before selling its genetically modified Viptera and Duracade seeds in the United States, which led to the rejection of U.S. corn shipments and a lowering of corn prices from 2013 to 2018. Continue reading