The 4-H Urban Immersion Project – Washington DC, September 20-23, 2018

Now in its fifth year, the Urban Immersion Project is an Ohio 4-H initiative that combines cross-cultural learning, teamwork and service learning in the urban area of Washington DC.

Teens ages 15-18 may apply for this 4 day service-learning experience.  This trip is structured to build skills and abilities to prepare youth for success in a diverse workplace while building cultural understanding of those who are different.
The cost of the experience is only $150.
Application deadline – August 3, 2018
Limited space available.
Application Here! 
For more information, call Steve Brady at 513.695.1311

Raising Malting Barley and Hops – June 25

Jamie Arthur of Little Miami Farms of Spring Valley will highlight his farming operation which involves raising malting barley and hops along with his involvement with the craft beer industry at the Monday June 25 meeting of Greene Co. Farm Forum. In addition he will share some of the research ongoing at OSU and other universities related to plant breeding and the opportunities for raising malt barley and hops.

The June 25 program starts at 6:30 p.m. with a meal and will be held at Union United Methodist Church located at 1145 Union Road, Xenia. The meal cost is $12/person and will be served prior to the program which starts around 7:15 p.m. Please RSVP Paul Ayres by Friday June 22 if you intend to have dinner. No reservations are necessary if you just wish to attend the meeting. For reservations contact Paul Ayres at 937-352-6379 or email him at payres1@woh.rr.com. The meeting is open to the public and sponsored by Greene Co. Farm Forum.

Tick Season Begins

Summer has arrived and so have the ticks! Based on reports from researchers across the state, tick season in Ohio is expected to be pretty bad this year. This can be attributed to the extended cool winter and spring.

Recently in a College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences news release, Glen Needham, a retired entomologist and tick expert formerly with Ohio State University Extension, stated “With the extended winter cold we’ve experienced this year and the slower to develop spring weather, you can expect to see a lot of ticks starting to come out all at once,” Needham said. “Think of it as kind of a tick logjam. Needham further explains, “Although we’ve experienced a longer than normal winter, we really didn’t have a polar vortex come through and kill back the ticks, which typically are pretty cold hardy.” For example, soil temperatures have to reach zero to minus 5 degrees Fahrenheit to freeze dog ticks, he said. “So really, all the extended cold weather did was just delay tick emergence,” Needham said. “With these 70- and 80-degree days we’re now experiencing, ticks are going to be active and very hungry.”

With the rising tick population comes the risk of contracting tickborne illnesses such as AnaplasmosisBabesiosis and Lyme disease. Lyme disease is the major threat associated with deer tick bites. Most Lyme disease cases occur during the summer when the poppy seed-sized nymphs are most active.

To prevent tick diseases, be sure you can identify the offenders. Stop by the OSU Extension Greene County office today and pick-up your Tick ID card (pictured above). If you have questions, please give us a call or email, Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Trevor Corboy at 937-372-9971 or corboy.3@osu.edu. Learn more at greene.osu.edu.

 

Ohioans Reminded to Take Simple Steps to Stay Healthy at Fairs

As fair season begins (Paulding County Fair – June 11-16, and Pickaway County Fair – June 16-23) below is a news release from the Ohio Department of Agriculture with information on how to stay healthy at the fairs.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

OHIOANS REMINDED TO TAKE SIMPLE STEPS TO STAY HEALTHY AT FAIRS

REYNOLDSBURG (June 6, 2018) As millions of Ohioans prepare to visit any of Ohio’s 94 county and independent fairs, leaders at the Ohio Departments of Agriculture (ODA) and Health (ODH) want to encourage guests to practice good hygiene when visiting livestock exhibits this summer.

“Ohio’s fairs are wonderful events that promote our state’s next generation of leaders and highlight the strength of food and agriculture as Ohio’s largest industry,” said ODA Director David T. Daniels. “We want to ensure that guests and animals at our fairs stay healthy and it’s so important that patrons follow posted signs and make healthy decisions when visiting the fair.”

Visitors should always wash their hands with soap and water before and after petting or touching any animal. Never eat, drink or put anything in your mouth in animal areas. Parents and caregivers are encouraged to leave strollers outside the animal exhibits and carry small children. Older adults, pregnant women, young children and people with weakened immune systems should consider avoiding animal areas.

“Simply washing your hands can help ensure your visit to a fair is fun and safe,” said ODH Director Lance Himes. “While not common, some illnesses can be directly transmitted between animals and humans, and fairgoers need to keep that in mind this summer.”

ODA works with fairboards to increase access to hand sanitizers and hand-washing stations and provides educational signage for posting at barns. Frequent hand-washing can lower the risk of getting sick from influenza, salmonella, e. Coli and other illnesses. Ohio’s fair veterinarians are trained to closely monitor fair livestock and poultry for clinical signs of illness.

Exhibitors who believe their animal may be sick should immediately contact their barn manager and fair veterinarian. Fair guests who experience illness should contact a medical professional, and their local health district.

OSU Extension Greene County Welcomes Summer Intern

https://www.fairborndailyherald.com/news/28133/osu-extension-greene-county-welcomes-summer-intern

Submitted photo Juliana Erwin is joining three Greene County Ohio State University Extension office staff this summer.

Submitted photo Juliana Erwin is joining three Greene County Ohio State University Extension office staff this summer.

XENIA — OSU Extension Greene County was selected to have one of 12 paid intern for the summer from June 4 to Aug. 10.

Juliana Erwin was a 11-year member of 4-H in Clark County. Erwin showed hogs and a dairy feeder in FFA. She is attending The Ohio State University studying community leadership extension education. She will be a senior for the 2018-2019 school year and will graduate in August 2019. Erwin lives in Springfield.

This summer she will be working with all of the staff at the OSU Extension Office. Some tasks include planning, helping or teaching community classes, day camps, field days or fairs. In addition, she will be attending meetings with community leaders and volunteers. Erwin will also develop materials and brochures specific to the county needs. She will also work with youth through a variety of 4-H activities including the Greene County Fair, Cloverbud Camp, Overnight Camp, and judging day.

”We are so excited to have her for the summer and all of the experience she will bring to Greene County,” said OSU Extension Greene County Director & Educator Rebecca Supinger. “Our programs will benefit from having her in our county.”

For more information on OSU Extension Greene County visit www.greene.osu.edu.

Hops Bulletin

The Ohio State University, will now be publishing a quarterly Hops Bulletin.  Authors are Brad Bergefurd, OSU Horticultural Specialist and Extension Educator and Charissa Gardner, OSU Program Coordinator.

In this bulletin you will find many exciting aspects about this growing industry, including crops reports, research, resources, and events.  All of which are important aspects for all growers.

Attached is the first of the Hops Bulletin.

AEDE Agricultural Outlook Newsletter

AEDE Agricultural Outlook Newsletter

Inside this issue:

Commodity Outlook up to May 31st– (Corn and Soybean markets have decreased in the last two weeks on uncertainty of exports to Mexico and China; however, todays WASDE does suggest continued strength in both soybean meal and ethanol production as outlined in the newsletter)

Agricultural Risk Coverage Payments Expected Lower in 2018 – (Representing the 2017 crop, but distributed in October of 2018)

As Trade Tensions Build, Do Ohio Producers Need to Worry?

Ohio CAUV Projections for 2018

Ohio Land Values and Cash Rent Outlook

 

Links to the full article can be found within the newsletter or at the Department’s website at aede@osu.edu.

1093rd Issue of Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Six new articles have been posted in this week’s 1093rd issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Late spring + above normal frequency of rainfall + above normal May temperature has the potential to be a disaster for cattlemen that depend on hay for quality winter feed. This week Chris Penrose and Dan Lima discuss what can happen when hay is baled at greater than optimum moisture levels, or the resulting quality if harvest is delayed..

Articles this week include:

  • Hay Moisture Levels
  • Determining a Manure Application Rate
  • A Comparison of Continuous vs. Management Intensive Grazing Systems
  • Multiflora Rose Problems in Pastures? Control it Now!
  • Calf Castration Considerations
  • Fed Heifer Marketings Surge over Last 6 Weeks

CORN Newsletter – June 12

June 12 – June 18, 2018

Corn Newsletter Online

2018-17

 

Double Crop Soybean Considerations

Laura Lindsey

Small grain harvest will soon be underway. For profitable double crop soybean production, there must be adequate time for the production of the soybean crop and soil moisture. Double crop soybean management differs from traditional, full-season soybean management.

 

Relative Maturity- Relative maturity has little effect on yield when soybeans are planted during the first three weeks of May. However, the effect of relative maturity can be larger for later planting dates. When planting double crop…https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-17/double-crop-soybean-considerations

 

Rest of June warmer than normal with high rainfall variability Jim Noel Not much has change since last week in terms of the outlook. The rest of June is likely to be warmer than normal with high variability of rainfall but tendency to above normal rainfall.

 

It appears a heat dome will be centered in the south central U.S. this summer with periods where it shifts over the corn and soybean belt and Ohio Valley. The next surge of heat will come this weekend into early next week. With these surges come a ring of fire of storms around the heat dome leading to locally…https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-17/rest-june-warmer-normal-high-rainfall-variability

 

Wheat and Barley: Cool, Wet Late-Season Conditions Pierce Paul Cool weather and moisture after flowering often means extended grain-fill and high yields, especially when disease levels are as low as they were at the time of pollination and early grain development in some fields. However, excessive rainfall associated with the cool temperatures could increase the severity of diseases that thrive under cool conditions. But with the crop now well into grain-fill and even turning in some locations, there is very little you can do about late-season diseases….https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-17/wheat-and-barley-cool-wet-late-season-conditions

 

Western Ohio Precision Ag Field Day Planned Sam Custer, Amanda Bennett Western Ohio Precision Ag Field Day is planned for July 16, 2018 beginning at 8 a.m. at 9060 Versailles, Southeastern Road, Versailles.

 

This event will feature field demonstrations on nutrient placement, management, and utilizing field data to make decisions. Credits will be available for fertilizer applicator re-certification, certified crop consultants, and certified livestock managers.

 

Several agribusinesses will be participating in the trade show. Those currently include Integrated Ag…https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-17/western-ohio-precision-ag-field-day-planned

 

Diagnosing Soybean Seedling Issues in 2018 Anne Dorrance, Kelley  Tilmon, Laura Lindsey, Mark Loux It seemed to take forever this spring, but hopefully all of your soybeans are planted ? for the first and only time.? Ohio?s biggest challenge is replanting; it is costly (new seed, cost of planting, lower yields due to delay in planting).? The first step is assessing overall stand health ? do you have enough plants to obtain the best yields?? Based on a substantial amount of data, for soybeans planted in May, a harvest population of at least 100,000 plants/acre is generally adequate…https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-17/diagnosing-soybean-seedling-issues-2018

 

EVENTS:

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

06/14/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Field Day at OARCD Northwest Ag Research Station

06/21/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/field-day-oarcd-northwest-ag-research-station

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

06/28/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

07/12/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

07/26/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

08/09/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

08/23/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Precision Ag Day — Data Management (Woodstock)

08/29/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/precision-ag-day-data-management-woodstock

 

Farm Science Review

09/18/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/farm-science-review-0

 

Contributors(s):

Wayne  Dellinger (Union County)

Lee Beers, CCA (Trumbull County )

Ted Wiseman (Perry County)

Amanda Bennett (Miami County)

Clifton Martin, CCA (Muskingum County)

Rory Lewandowski, CCA (Wayne County)

Sam Custer (Darke County)

Jeff Stachler (Auglaize County)

Dean Kreager (Licking County)

Sarah Noggle (Paulding County)

Eric Richer, CCA (Fulton County)

Garth Ruff (Henry County)

Amanda Douridas (Champaign County)

Mark Badertscher (Hardin County)

Rich Minyo

Bruce Clevenger, CCA (Defiance County)

Dennis Riethman (Mercer County)

Glen Arnold, CCA (Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management ) Kelley  Tilmon (State Specialist, Field Crop Entomology) Anne Dorrance (Extension Specialist, Soybean Diseases) Pierce Paul (State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases) Elizabeth Hawkins (Field Specialist Agronomic Systems) Steve Culman (State Specialist, Soil Fertility) David Dugan (Adams, Brown and Highland Counties)

Corn Newsletter Online

June 5 – June 11, 2018

Corn Newsletter Online

2018-16

Increasing Variability In Rainfall

Jim Noel

As summer nears, the weather pattern supports an increasing risk of big differences in rainfall totals from too wet to too dry.https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-16/increasing-variability-rainfall

 

Early Corn Coloration ? Green, Purple, or Yellow?

Alexander Lindsey, Steve Culman, Peter Thomison Corn seedlings often turn yellow (due to low nitrogen uptake and/or limited chlorophyll synthesis) or purple (reduced root development and/or increased anthocyanin production) under cool, wet conditions. Some hybrids are more likely to increase anthocyanin (purple pigment) content when plants are cool. Yellowing or purpling of corn plants at this stage of development generally has little or no effect on later crop performance or yield potential.https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-16/early-corn-coloration-?-green-purple-or-yellow

 

Using PEAQ to Estimate Alfalfa NDF for Multiple Cuttings Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Mark Sulc Much of the region?s alfalfa crop has been harvested over the past two weeks.? As cooler temperatures move into the area regrowth will likely slow down. Once regrowth reaches 16 inches tall again, the NDF (neutral detergent fiber crude protein)?can rapidly be estimated in the field using the predictive equations for alfalfa quality (PEAQ).https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-16/using-peaq-estimate-alfalfa-ndf-multiple-cuttings

 

Corn leaf striping often temporary

Steve Culman, Peter Thomison

Leaf striping (interveinal chlorosis) in corn is appearing in many Ohio fields.? There are several nutrient deficiencies (including sulfur, zinc, magnesium, and manganese) that result in leaf striping and some of these look similar. The severity of the striping may vary considerably within a field and may be associated with differences in soil pH, organic matter, compaction, tillage, temperature and moisture. Bright yellow to white interveinal striping running the length of leaves may be the result of ?genetic stripe?, but it?s usually limited to scattered plants within a field.https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-16/corn-leaf-striping-often-temporary

 

Weed of the Week: Cressleaf Groundsel

Sarah Noggle

Many questions come into the County Extension Office daily.? Many times those include a question about a weed identification.? During the month of June 2018, OSU Extension will be featuring a weed identification of the week.? This week’s weed is cressleaf groundsel,?Senecio glabellus.?https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-16/weed-week-cressleaf-groundsel

 

Agronomic Field Day June 21 at OARDC Northwest Ag Research Station Alan Sundermeier, CCA The public is invited to attend at no cost the 2018 Agronomic Field Day.? It will be held on Thursday, June 21 starting at 9:00 am to 11:30 am.? The location is 4240 Range Line Road, Custar, Ohio, 43511.?

 

The topics for the field day include:https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-16/agronomic-field-day-june-21-oardc-northwest-ag-research-station

 

EVENTS:

Small Grains Field Day

06/12/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/small-grains-field-day

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

06/14/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Field Day at OARCD Northwest Ag Research Station

06/21/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/field-day-oarcd-northwest-ag-research-station

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

06/28/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

07/12/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

07/26/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

08/09/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Lady Landowners Leaving  Legacy (Urbana)

08/23/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/lady-landowners-leaving-legacy-urbana

 

Precision Ag Day — Data Management (Woodstock)

08/29/2018

https://agcrops.osu.edu/events/precision-ag-day-data-management-woodstock

 

Contributors(s):

Jeff Stachler (Auglaize County)

Wayne  Dellinger (Union County)

Mark Badertscher (Hardin County)

Sam Custer (Darke County)

Les Ober, CCA (Geauga County)

Jason Hartschuh, CCA (Crawford County)

Clifton Martin, CCA (Muskingum County)

Ted Wiseman (Perry County)

Mary Griffith (Madison County)

Rory Lewandowski, CCA (Wayne County)

Amanda Douridas (Champaign County)

Dean Kreager (Licking County)

John Schoenhals, CCA (Williams County)

Mike Gastier, CCA (Huron County)

Dennis Riethman (Mercer County)

Lee Beers, CCA (Trumbull County )

David Dugan (Adams, Brown and Highland Counties) Jim Noel (National Weather Service) Glen Arnold, CCA (Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management ) Greg LaBarge, CCA (Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems) Andy Michel (State Specialist, Entomology) Steve Culman (State Specialist, Soil Fertility) Peter Thomison (Extension Specialist, Corn Production) Anne Dorrance (Extension Specialist, Soybean Diseases)