Ohio New and Small Farm Colleges Set for 2021

Bringing small farms in Ohio to life is the theme of the New and Small Farm College program that has been offered to farm families since 2005. The program focuses on the increasing number of new and small farm landowners that have a need for comprehensive farm ownership and management programming.

The mission of the college is to provide a greater understanding of production practices, economics of land use choices, assessment of personal and natural resources, marketing alternatives, and the identification of sources of assistance.

The New and Small Farm College has three educational objectives:

  1. To improve the economic development of small farm family-owned farms in
  2. To help small farm landowners and families diversify their opportunities into successful new enterprises and new
  3. To improve agricultural literacy among small farm landowners not actively involved in agricultural

 

Since the program began, the New and Small Farm College has now reached over 1175 participants from 57 Ohio Counties representing almost 900 farms.

 

If you are a small farm landowner wondering what to do with your acreage, ask yourself these questions:

 

Are you interested in exploring options for land uses but not sure where to turn or how to begin?

 

Have you considered adding an agricultural or horticultural enterprise, but you just aren’t sure of what is required, from an equipment, labor, and/or a management perspective?

 

Are you looking for someplace to get some basic farm information?

 

If you or someone you know answered yes to any of these questions, then the Ohio State University New and Small Farm College program may be just what you are looking for.

 

The Ohio State University New and Small Farm College is a 7-session short course that will be held one night a week.  The 2021 Ohio New and Small Farm College program will be held in three locations across the state including:

 

Pike County area, to be held at the OSU South Centers facility, 1864 Shyville Road, Piketon, Ohio 45661, (Located off US 32 – Appalachian Hwy). Classes will be held on Wednesday evenings beginning August 18 and concluding September 29, 2021. For more information contact Pike County Extension Office at 740-289-4837.

 

Fayette county area, Fayette County Extension Office, 1415 US Route 22 SW, Washington Court House, Ohio 43160. Classes will be held on Thursday evenings beginning August 19 and concluding on September 30, 2021. For more information contact the Fayette County Extension Office at 740-335-1150.

 

Wayne County area, to be held at the OSU Wooster Campus, The Shisler Conference Center, 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster, Ohio 44961. Classes will be held on Tuesday evenings beginning August 31 and concluding October 12, 2021. For more information, contact Wayne County Extension at 330-264-8722.

 

All colleges will start each evening at 6:00 pm with a light dinner with the nightly presentations beginning at 6:30 pm and concluding at 9:00 pm.

 

Topics that will be covered in the Small Farm College course include:

  • Getting Started (goal setting, family matters, resource inventory, business planning)
  • Appropriate Land Use -Walking the Farm
  • Where to Get Assistance, (identifying various agencies, organizations, and groups)
  • Financial and Business Mgmt.: Strategies for decision makers
  • Farm Insurance
  • Soils
  • Legal Issues
  • Marketing Alternatives

 

In addition to the classroom instruction, participants will receive tickets to attend the 2021 Farm Science Review (www.fsr.osu.edu ), September 21, 22, & 23 Located at the Molly Caren Farm, London, Ohio. A soil sample analysis will also be provided to each participating farm.

 

The cost of the course is $125 per person, $100 for an additional family member.  Each participating family will receive a small farm college notebook full of the information presented in each class session plus additional materials.

 

Registrations are now being accepted. For more details about the course and/or a registration form, contact Tony Nye, Small Farm Program Coordinator 937-382-0901 or email at nye.1@osu.edu.

CORN Newsletter 22-2021

 

July 13 – 19

 

Editor: Stephanie Karhoff

 

Soybean Defoliation: It Takes a lot to Really Matter!

Authors: Curtis Young, CCA, Kelley Tilmon

The mid-season defoliators are beginning to show up in soybean fields across Ohio.

Read more

 

Tar Spot Showing Early this Year: a Note on Diagnosis

Author: Pierce Paul

I have so far only received one confirmed report of Tar Spot in the state, but the fact that the disease has been reported in a few neighboring states has some stakeholders asking questions about diagnosis and management. Tar Spot is a relatively easy disease to diagnose.

Read more

 

Pre-harvest Sprouting and Falling Number

Authors: Pierce Paul, Laura Lindsey, Wanderson B. Moraes

Persistent rainfall over the last several days has prevented some wheat fields from being harvested. This could lead to pre-harvest sprouting and other grain quality issues.

Read more

 

Nutrient Value of Wheat Straw

Authors: Laura Lindsey, Ed Lentz, CCA

Before removing straw from the field, it is important farmers understand the nutrient value.

Read more

 

Steps to Speed up Field Curing of Hay Crops

Authors: Mark Sulc, Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Allen Gahler

The rainy weather in many regions of Ohio and surrounding states is making it difficult to harvest hay crops.  We usually wait for a clear forecast before cutting hay, and with good reason because hay does not dry in the rain!

Read more

 

Late Wheat Harvest and Grain Quality Concerns

Authors: Laura Lindsey, Pierce Paul

Most of the winter wheat in Ohio has been harvested. However, persistent wet weather has delayed harvest in some areas of the state.

Read more

 

Western Bean Cutworm Numbers Begin to Increase Across Ohio

Authors: Amy Raudenbush, Suranga Basnagala , Aaron Wilson, Olivia Lang, Kyle Akred, Angela Arnold, Mark Badertscher, Jordan Beck, Frank Becker, Lee Beers, CCA, Bruce Clevenger, CCA, Tom Dehaas, Taylor Dill, Nick Eckel, Allen Gahler, Jamie Hampton, Andrew Holden, James Jasinski, Stephanie Karhoff, Alan Leininger, Ed Lentz, CCA, Cecilia Lokai-Minnich, David Marrison, Jess McWatters, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, CCA, Maggie Pollard, Eric Richer, CCA, Beth Scheckelhoff, Clint Schroeder, Mike Sunderman, Curtis Young, CCA, Chris Zoller, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

Western bean cutworm (WBC) numbers for the week ending July 11 have increased to the point where scouting for egg masses is recommended in Fulton, Henry, Lorain and Lucas counties.

Read more

 

About C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

 

Contributors:

 

Glen Arnold, CCA
Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management

 

Mark Badertscher
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Lee Beers, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Rachel Cochran
Water Quality Extension Associate

 

Taylor Dill
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Amanda Douridas
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Nick Eckel
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mike Estadt
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Ken Ford
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Allen Gahler
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jamie Hampton
Extension Educator, ANR

 

Jason Hartschuh, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Elizabeth Hawkins
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Andrew Holden
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Alan Leininger
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Laura Lindsey
State Specialist, Soybean and Small Grains

 

David Marrison
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jess McWatters

 

Gigi Neal
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Sarah Noggle
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Les Ober, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Pierce Paul
State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases

 

Eric Richer, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dennis Riethman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Joseph Ringler
Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Beth Scheckelhoff
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Matthew Schmerge
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Clint Schroeder
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mark Sulc
State Specialist, Forage Production

 

Kelley Tilmon
State Specialist, Field Crop Entomology

 

Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Hallie Williams
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Ted Wiseman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Curtis Young, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Chris Zoller
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.

Mysterious Bird Illness Strikes Ohio

 

What is Going on with the Birds? Mysterious Illness Affecting Ohio Birds

Have you seen or heard about an illness in Ohio affecting songbirds? If so, the attached handout has some information on the mysterious disease. At this time, biologists are unclear as to what is causing birds to get sick, but diagnostic laboratories, including the National Wildlife Health Center, are on the case. Check out the below publication for more information and what you can do to help.

In addition, the Ohio Division of Wildlife has created a new webpage for sharing updates and easy access to their reporting websites.

Beef Quality Assurance Recertification – 7/12/21

WHAT IS BQA?

Beef Quality Assurance is a nationally coordinated, state-implemented program that provides systematic information to U.S. beef producers and beef consumers on how common sense husbandry techniques can be coupled with accepted scientific knowledge to raise cattle under optimum management and environmental conditions. BQA guidelines are designed to make certain all beef consumers can take pride in what they purchase – and can trust and have confidence in the entire beef industry.

BQA Certification Flyer 7.12.21

Options for completion:

  • Complete your certification online at your own pace at www.bqa.org

  • Monday, July 12, 2021

    • 5:30pm OSU Extension Greene County
    • 100 Fairground Road, Xenia, Ohio 45385
    • Cost: $15
    • Register by stopping by or calling the office at 937-372-9971

CORN Newsletter

June 8, 2021 – June 14, 2021

 

Editor: Sarah Noggle

 

High Temperatures Mean Higher Risk of Spray Drift

Author: Erdal Ozkan

Mean high temperatures for the month of June in Central Ohio vary between 75°F at the beginning of the month and approaches around 80°F towards the end of the month.

Read more

 

June 10th Webinar focuses on In-season Nitrogen Application

Authors: Mary Griffith, Amanda Douridas, Mike Estadt, Will Hamman

As many producers are getting ready to side-dress corn, the agronomic crops team will host a free webinar on June 10th focused on important considerations and practices to achieve the efficient application of nitrogen.

Read more

 

Upcoming Events

 

June 9

 

2021 Overholt Drainage Workshop

 

June 10

 

June 10th Webinar Focuses on In-season Nitrogen Application

 

June 22

 

Small Grains Field Day

 

July 9

 

Science for Success

 

August 6

 

Science for Success

 

About C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

 

Contributors:

 

Glen Arnold, CCA
Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management

 

Mark Badertscher
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Rachel Cochran
Water Quality Extension Associate

 

Trevor Corboy
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Wayne Dellinger, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Nick Eckel
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mike Estadt
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Ken Ford
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mike Gastier, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mary Griffith
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Will Hamman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jamie Hampton
Extension Educator, ANR

 

Jason Hartschuh, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Elizabeth Hawkins
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Andrew Holden
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dean Kreager
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Laura Lindsey
State Specialist, Soybean and Small Grains

 

Mark Loux
State Specialist, Weed Science

 

David Marrison
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Brigitte Moneymaker
Water Quality Extension Associate

 

James Morris
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Gigi Neal
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Sarah Noggle
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Les Ober, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Erdal Ozkan
State Specialist, Sprayer Technology

 

Pierce Paul
State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases

 

Richard Purdin
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Eric Richer, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dennis Riethman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Matthew Schmerge
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Aaron Wilson
Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center

 

Curtis Young, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Chris Zoller
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.

Homeowner Lawns Spring/Summer – 6/23

Check out this upcoming program in partnership with Greene Soil and Water Conservation District on Homeowner Lawn Care for Late Spring and Early Summer. The program will be held via zoom on June 23 at 6 p.m. Topics will range from soil sampling, soil nutrient needs, how to manage nutrients in your lawn and more. See the Flyer – Homeowner Lawns SpringSummer_6.23.21 and information below to register.

Do you have questions about lawn care? Are you interested in learning about lawn care from a science based approach? Do some of these questions keep you up at night: How much fertilizer does my lawn need? When should I be applying? Do I need lime? How much do I need to be watering? Should I have my soil tested? How do I test my soil? I’ve tested my soil, but how do I interpret the results? We can help.

Location: Zoom – Pre-register at go.osu.edu/greenelawn

Cost: FREE; Pre- Registration Required

Contact information: Trevor Corboy 937-372-9971 or Amanda McKay 937-416-6906

Home Owner Lawn Care Program – 6/23/21

OSU EXTENSION GREENE COUNTY & GREENE SWCD PRESENTS:

Homeowner Lawn Care: Late Spring & Early Summer
WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021, 6:00 P.M.

Do you have questions about lawn care? Are you interested in learning about lawn care from a science based approach? Do some of these questions keep you up at night: How much fertilizer does my lawn need? When should I be applying? Do I need lime? How much do I need to be watering? Should I have my soil tested? How do I test my soil? I’ve tested my soil, but how do I interpret the results? We can help.

Location: Zoom –Pre-register at go.osu.edu/greenelawn

Cost: FREE; Pre-Registration Required

Contact information: Trevor Corboy 937-372-9971 or Amanda McKay 937-416-6906

CORN Newsletter

June 1, 2021 – June 7, 2021

 

Editor: Sarah Noggle

 

Recommendations for Soybeans Planted in June

Author: Laura Lindsey

According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, 66% of soybean acreage in Ohio was planted by May 23. As soybean planting continues into June, consider row spacing, seeding rate, and relative maturity adjustments.

Read more

 

Potato Leafhoppers Have Arrived in an Alfalfa Field Near You

Authors: Mark Sulc, Curtis Young, CCA, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

Potato leafhopper adults have been observed in alfalfa fields in Ohio. These adults have likely begun laying eggs, and it only takes about 3 weeks for these eggs to hatch into nymphs and develop into adults. Populations of PLH will begin increasing.

Read more

 

Common-sense practices for effective spraying of pesticides

Author: Erdal Ozkan

June is a busy time with spraying pesticides, especially herbicides. Paying attention to some key principles of spraying is likely to result in achieving your goal: maximum net return on expensive pesticides sprayed.

Read more

 

Fertilizing Hay and Pastures

Authors: Mark Sulc, Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA

Many hay producers across the state have completed or are in the process of completing their first cutting of the year. One of the two best times to topdress maintenance fertilizer on hay is right after the first cutting. The other top choice is in the early fall.

Read more

 

In-Person Small Grains Field Day: June 22 at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station in Wood County

Authors: Laura Lindsey, Eric Richer, CCA, Nick Eckel, Ed Lentz, CCA

Join OSU Extension for an in-person small grains field day on June 22 at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station in Wood County.

Read more

 

Upcoming Events

 

June 4

 

Science for Success

 

June 9

 

2021 Overholt Drainage Workshop

 

June 22

 

Small Grains Field Day

 

July 9

 

Science for Success

 

August 6

 

Science for Success

 

About C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

 

Contributors:

 

Mark Badertscher
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jordan Beck
Water Quality Extension Associate

 

Bruce Clevenger, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Wayne Dellinger, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Nick Eckel
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Boden Fisher
Water Quality Extension Associate

 

Mary Griffith
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Will Hamman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jason Hartschuh, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Elizabeth Hawkins
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Stephanie Karhoff
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dean Kreager
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Ed Lentz, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

David Marrison
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Clifton Martin, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

James Morris
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Gigi Neal
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Sarah Noggle
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Erdal Ozkan
State Specialist, Sprayer Technology

 

Pierce Paul
State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases

 

Eric Richer, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dennis Riethman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Garth Ruff
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Beth Scheckelhoff
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Clint Schroeder
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mark Sulc
State Specialist, Forage Production

 

Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Hallie Williams
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Aaron Wilson
Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center

 

Ted Wiseman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Curtis Young, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Chris Zoller
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Seven new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1245 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef

Articles this week include:

  • Managing the Breeding Season and Reproductive Performance of the Beef Herd
  • Keep an Eye on that Bull
  • Meeting Cow Nutrient Requirements in the Winter Starts in the Spring
  • It’s all about maximizing a grazing season!
  • Poisonous Pasture Weeds and Livestock
  • JBS Cyber Attack
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for May 28, 2021

Poison Hemlock and Wild Parsnip are Bolting and Blooming

Poison Hemlock and Wild Parsnip are Bolting and Blooming

Author Joe Boggs

Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is one of the deadliest plants in North America.  Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) sap can produce severe, painful skin blistering.  Both are commonly found growing together in Ohio and both are beginning to “bolt” and bloom meaning the clock is quickly winding down for controlling these non-native nasties.

These non-native weeds are members of the carrot family, Apiaceae.  The old name for the family was Umbelliferae which refers to the umbel flowers.  The flowers are a key family feature with short flower stalks rising from a common point like the ribs on an umbrella.  Queen Anne’s lace (a.k.a. wild carrot) (Daucus carota) is often used as the poster child for carrot family flowers.  This non-native blooms much later in the season.

Poison hemlock produces white flowers on stalks that create a more rounded look.  Wild parsnip has intense yellow flowers with the stalks producing a more flat-topped appearance.

Poison hemlock has a biennial life cycle. The first year is spent in the “vegetative stage” as a low-growing basal rosette.  Plants “bolt” during the second year “reproductive stage” to produce erect multi-branched stems topped with umbrella-like flowers.  Plants are bolting with some already producing flowers in southern Ohio.

Wild parsnip is also reported to have a biennial life cycle.  However, it may occasionally behave as a monocarpic perennial spending more than a year in the vegetative stage before flowering once and then dying.  Like poison hemlock, wild parsnip plants are also bolting and beginning to flower in southern Ohio.

Mature poison hemlock plants can tower as much as 6 – 10 ft. tall.  Mature wild parsnip plants are shorter in stature but still impressive at up to 4 – 5 ft. tall.  Both are prolific seed producers with seeds remaining viable for 4 – 6 years for poison hemlock and around 4 years for wild parsnip.

Why Worry?

Poison hemlock plants contain highly toxic piperidine alkaloid compounds, including coniine and gamma-coniceine, which cause respiratory failure and death in mammals. The roots are more toxic than the leaves and stems; however, all parts of the plant including the seeds should be considered dangerous.

The toxins must be ingested or enter through the eyes or nasal passages to induce poisoning; they do not cause skin rashes or blistering.  Regardless, this plant should not be handled because sap on the skin can be rubbed into the eyes or accidentally ingested while handling food.

Wild parsnip sap contains psoralen which presents a completely different mode of action compared to the piperidine alkaloids in poison hemlock sap.  Psoralen is a naturally occurring phytochemical grouped in a family of organic compounds known as linear furanocoumarins.  Psoralen acts as a photosensitizing compound by inhibiting DNA synthesis in epidermal cells, killing these light-shielding cells responsible for protecting us from long-wave ultraviolet radiation (LWUVR) bombarding us in sunlight.

Severe blistering occurs when the affected skin is exposed to LWUVR. The synergistic effect is called phytophotodermatitis (a.k.a. Berloque dermatitis) and the burn-like symptoms, as well as skin discoloration, may last for several months.

However, connecting skin blistering to exposure to wild parsnip sap can be a challenge.  It takes around 24 hours for symptoms to first appear after exposure to LWURV and severe blistering typically doesn’t peak until 48 -72 hours.  The time required for symptoms to appear after exposure to the sap means the effect may be disconnected from the cause.

Another challenge with connecting the dots is that wild parsnip commonly grows in and around other weeds, particularly poison hemlock (Conium maculatum).  Gardeners who are exposed to wild parsnip sap while weeding a mixed patch may mistakenly blame the poison hemlock for their ultimate misery.

Psoralens are also found in several other members of the Apiaceae family including the notorious giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) which has captured national attention in the past.  However, giant hogweed has only been confirmed in Ohio growing in the extreme northeast part of the state primarily in and around Ashtabula County.  Wild parsnip is found throughout the state and is equally damaging.  Of course, giant hogweed has a more threatening sounding common name; wild parsnip just sounds like a vegetable gone wild; which it is!

To Mow, or Not to Mow

The potential for poisonings from poison hemlock sap and the extreme skin reaction to the wild parsnip sap means these non-native invasive weeds should not be allowed to grow where they can be easily contacted by people.  However, mechanical control through mowing, weed trimming, or hand-pulling is problematic.  Certainly, wild parsnip presents a much higher risk with reports of sap spattered by mowers and string trimmers producing phytophotodermatitis on exposed arms and legs of equipment operators.

Still, mowing provides one option for managing poison hemlock and to a lesser degree wild parsnip as long as proper precautions are followed including wearing personal protective gear and equipment cleanup with soap and water.  However, timing is everything:  plants should be mowed once plants have bolted but before heavy flowering.  In other words, RIGHT NOW in southern Ohio!

I’ve watched a gas line right-of-way near my home being slowly converted to a poison hemlock (and teasel) right-of-way over the years because of poorly timed mowing.  Each season for the past several years, the right-of-way has been mowed in late August or September.

Of course, this is long after poison hemlock seed had been shed.  Mowing at that time of the year failed to cut the low-growing first-season poison hemlock rosettes.  What it did accomplish was to expose the rosettes to full sun for the winter and it eliminated plant competition with the poison hemlock flourishing when spring rolled around.  It’s also providing me with great poison hemlock photo ops!

Chemical Control Case Studies

Given the problematic nature of controlling poison hemlock and wild parsnip by physical removal, herbicides may be the best option particularly in areas where the weeds present a clear and present danger to the public.  I’ve observed both poison hemlock and wild parsnip being effectively managed in two parks in southern Ohio with properly timed herbicide applications.

Glenwood Gardens which is part of the Great parks of Hamilton County system, began targeting these non-native weeds last year with selective post-emergent herbicides and have had excellent results.  Voice of America (VOA) MetroPark which is part of the Butler County MetroParks system has declared war on poison hemlock and wild parsnip this season with dramatic results.

Poison hemlock and wild parsnip are susceptible to several selective and non-selective postemergent herbicides.  However, keep in mind that non-selective herbicides such as glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) can also illuminate plants that compete with these weeds.  Herbicidal openings produced by non-selective herbicides provide perfect opportunities for more wild parsnip and poison hemlock to spring forth from previously deposited seed.  Thus, it’s important to have a plan for establishing competitive plants such as over-seeding with grasses.

Selective post-emergent herbicides will preserve competitive plants.  Herbicides effective against wild parsnip and poison hemlock include clopyralid (e.g. Transline), metsulfuron (e.g. Escort XP), triclopyr (e.g. Triclopyr 4), and combination products such as those that contain 2,4-D, mecoprop, and dichlorprop (e.g. Triamine).  Applications made now can significantly reduce infestations of both wild parsnip and poison hemlock.  However, with plants beginning to flower, the control clock is winding down.