Greene Co. Beef Quality Assurance Certification – February 2, 2019

Join OSU Extension Greene County on February 2, 2019 at 10 a.m. for a Beef Quality Assurance Certification at the office on the fairgrounds. Beef and dairy

farmers as well as 4-H & FFA members who show or sell these projects should strongly consider becoming certified.

In 2019, some of America’s largest meat distributers will only buy beef that is from BQA Certified producers. This certification is not mandated by law. However, it is being required by some of the links that make up the beef supply chain, including auction barns, feed lots, packers, retailers, and consumers. Essentially, marketing beef without BQA certification will become increasingly difficult and those who do so successfully may find their compensation inadequate.

The February 2, Greene County training will certify participants for three years. This opportunity is for any beef or dairy cattle producer in Greene County or surrounding area at $10 per person to cover educational materials. Additionally, Greene County 4-H and FFA members exhibiting beef or dairy market animals are strongly encouraged to attend for no charge. This will also cover their annual requirement for Quality Assurance for 2019. Special thank you to Greene County Cattlemen’s for providing lunch for the program.

Also, a session for the annual Quality Assurance for 4-H and FFA members will be held on February 2 starting at 10 a.m. at the OSU Extension office. This is for anyone showing livestock market projects at Fair that require Quality Assurance annually. Additional opportunities to complete annual Quality Assurance for youth will be on March 25 at 10 a.m., March 27 at 6 p.m., and May 8 during a Goat Clinic. More details on these additional opportunities are forthcoming.

Visit greene.osu.edu to more details and to register for these upcoming programs. Questions on Beef Quality Assurance can be directed to OSU Extension Greene County, Trevor Corboy, Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator at 937-372-9971 ext. 114 or corboy.3@osu.edu. Further, annual 4-H & FFA youth Quality Assurance questions may be directed to 4-H Youth Development Educator, Rebecca Supinger at supinger.5@osu.edu.

Ohio BEEF Cattle letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

 

Five new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1111 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

 

With significantly cooler temperatures upon us throughout Ohio, this week Mark Sulc shares concerns for the forage species that can be extremely toxic soon after a frost or freeze.

 

Articles this week include:

  • Avoid Forage Toxicities After Frosts
  • Too Much, Too Early
  • The Effect of Cow Udder Score on Calf Performance
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for October 12, 2018
  • Spot, Futures and Forward Markets

Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Three new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1108 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Rain makes grain . . . and LOTS of weeds too! This week Christine Gelley and Clifton Martin talk about a relatively new weed that’s invading eastern Ohio pastures – spotted knapweed.

Articles this week include:

  • Spotted Knapweed; a weed quickly becoming a growing concern!
  • Biennial and Perennial Weed Control is Best in the Fall
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for September 21, 2018

Ohio BEEF Cattle letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

 

Four new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1106 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

 

It’s been 10 years since Ohio’s fence laws were updated, and yet today there remains confusion among some on how to interpret them. This week Christine Gelley clarifies many of the questions, and offers resources to explain the rest.

 

Articles this week include:

  • Neighborly Fence Care
  • Utilizing Corn Stalks and Extending the Grazing Season
  • Effect of Corn Residue Grazing or Baling on Subsequent Crop Yield and Nutrient Removal
  • Seasonality of Feeder Futures

Beef Cattle Letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Five new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1102 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

This week’s letter focuses on the beef cattle market . . . what’s happened, what’s happening, and what’s expected to happen for the balance of the year.

Articles this week include:

  • Beef AG NEWS Today, the August Podcast
  • Is That Tree or Shrub Poisonous? What You Don’t Want Your Cattle to Eat (Part II)
  • Mid-year Cattle Inventory Suggests Slower Expansion Ahead
  • Beef Continues to Fare Well, and a Personal Note
  • Lots of Down-Side Risk Ahead

Ohio BEEF Cattle letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Four new articles have been posted in this week’s 1100th issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Quality stored forages are already hard to come by in parts of Ohio this year. One of the quickest ways to reduce the need is to eliminate those cows that are open. This week we talk about culling, as well as adding value to those culls.

Articles this week include:

  • Financial, Management Benefits of Pregnancy Diagnosis
  • Flip this Cow: Adding Value by Reconditioning Cull Cows
  • Late Summer Establishment of Perennial Forages
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for July 27, 2018

Ohio BEEF Cattle letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

 

Seven new articles have been posted in this week’s 1097th issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

 

State wide, few springs have been as challenging as this one for getting quality forages harvested in a timely fashion. Now that first cutting might finally be concluded – in many parts of Ohio, just within the past week  – the challenge of finding a way to feed it effectively commences. This week Mark Landefeld addresses the situation.

 

Articles this week include:

  • You Finally Got the Hay Made, How Good is It?
  • Heat Stress in Feedlot Cattle
  • Water; Vital to Beating Summer Heat
  • Adequate Vegetative Cover Vital for Efficient Moisture Utilization
  • Manure Science Review – Wednesday, July 25
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for July 6, 2018
  • Abundance of Feedstuffs Lend Strength to Calf Prices

Beef Newsletter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

 

Out of respect for Independence Day, six new articles have been posted a day early in this week’s 1096th issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

 

As the saying goes, “if it was easy, everyone would be doing it.” Thus far this year very little related to anything that’s grown or raised outdoors has been easy. This week we focus on alternatives for dealing with many of the feed related challenges we’ve enjoyed to this point in 2018.

 

Articles this week include:

  • Avoiding Forage Shortages
  • When Rain Wrecks Your Pasture Plan!
  • Alternatives Remain for Producing High Quality Forages This Year
  • Stored Forage Production Systems
  • Feeding Sprouted or Otherwise Damaged Wheat to Beef Cattle
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for June 29, 2018

1093rd Issue of Ohio Beef Cattle Letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Six new articles have been posted in this week’s 1093rd issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Late spring + above normal frequency of rainfall + above normal May temperature has the potential to be a disaster for cattlemen that depend on hay for quality winter feed. This week Chris Penrose and Dan Lima discuss what can happen when hay is baled at greater than optimum moisture levels, or the resulting quality if harvest is delayed..

Articles this week include:

  • Hay Moisture Levels
  • Determining a Manure Application Rate
  • A Comparison of Continuous vs. Management Intensive Grazing Systems
  • Multiflora Rose Problems in Pastures? Control it Now!
  • Calf Castration Considerations
  • Fed Heifer Marketings Surge over Last 6 Weeks

1091st Issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle Letter

Dear Ohio BEEF Cattle letter subscribers,

Six new articles have been posted in this week’s 1091st issue of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

Mother Nature has offered some unique challenges this spring, none the least of which is pasture and hay management. That’s a focus of this week’s articles.

Articles this week include:

  • When Should We Mow Pastures?
  • The Hay Debate: Quality versus Quantity
  • Discover Native Warm-Season Forages on June 16, 2018
  • Start Now to Prevent Anaplasmosis This Fall
  • A survey of recommended practices made by veterinary practitioners to cow-calf operations in the U.S. & Canada
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for May 25, 20