‘What kind of world is this when a biologist needs to be scared to tell the truth?’

CFAES’s 2018 Environmental Film Series continues at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19, with “A River Below.” It’s the story of two South American activists’ attempts to use media coverage to help save the endangered Amazon River dolphin, but who face ethical and moral issues along the way.

“What sacrifices are acceptable in the battle for this endangered animal, and what are the grander social, economical and environmental issues involved?” Cara Cusumano, Tribeca Film Festival programming director, asks in writing about the film on the festival’s website. “Mark Grieco’s surprising documentary digs into the ethics of activism in the modern media age.”

Watch the trailer above. Get full details about the screening.

CFAES’s celebrity snakes are back tweeting

Warm weather’s here, and the rattlesnake stars of the @TimberTweets feed — Jimbo, Hope, et al — are back, active and tweeting. Follow their rarely seen daily lives in the woods of southern Ohio. It’s all in the name of research being done by CFAES’s Peterman Lab. Fun fact (unless you’re a rodent or a tick): Timber rattlesnakes eat rodents that carry Lyme disease ticks. (Photo: iStock.)

Seats going fast for ‘An Evening with Grizzly Bear 399’

Only about 250 seats remain out of the original 1,000 available for “An Evening with Grizzly Bear 399” on Oct. 24 at Ohio State. So says CFAES’s David Hanselmann, coordinator of the Environmental Professionals Network, which is hosting the event. Read more here. Register here.

Ohio State hosting talks on famous grizzly bear, Ted Turner’s green impact in West

T. A. Moulton BarnTwo special events at Ohio State will look at two big personalities — a famous grizzly bear and media mogul turned environmentalist Ted Turner, who was born in Ohio — and the mark they’re making on the American West. Continue reading

Register by Friday for Endangered Species Act workshop

ESA workshopRegister by this Friday, May 22, for a May 29 workshop on the Endangered Species Act. The workshop is for natural resource professionals who work with the act — and with endangered species like the Kirtland’s warbler shown here. CFAES scientist Jeremy Bruskotter, one of the event’s organizers, said the Endangered Species Act is more important than ever due to persistent threats like climate change and new issues such as white-nose disease in bats. Congress passed the act in 1973. Details and a link to online registration. (Photo: Joel Trick, USWFS.)