Rattan Lal quoted in Wall Street Journal

CFAES’ Rattan Lal, Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science and a 2019 winner of the prestigious Japan Prize, was interviewed for a recent story in the Wall Street Journal. In “How to Get Rid of Carbon Emissions: Pay Farmers to Bury Them,” Lal talks about whether paying farmers to sequester carbon to fight the climate crisis is realistic or not, and what some feasible goals could be. The story is here, but you’ll need a subscription to read it.

Lal founded and directs CFAES’ Carbon Management and Sequestration Center. In the video above, he explains the interconnected reasons for storing organic matter (such as carbon) in the soil.

Temple Grandin to speak in central Ohio

Temple Grandin, world-renowned expert on both animal science and autism, speaks as part of the “Animals in Our Lives” program, a fundraising event for CFAES’ Center for Human-Animal Interactions Research and Education (or CHAIRE), on Sept. 30 in Dublin, Ohio.

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Farm ponds, K-9s: Thursday in the Gwynne

On tap for Thursday, Sept. 19, in the Gywnne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review are Top Five Pond Enquiries (10–10:30 a.m.), K-9 Units (11–11:30 p.m.), The Concept of Cover: Managing Structure for Pond Fisheries (noon to 12:30 p.m.), Invasives You Should Know (12:30–1 p.m.), and six other educational sessions. See the full schedule.

Farm Science Review continues through today, Sept. 19, at CFAES’ Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio.

Oaks, aquaculture, flood-tolerant forages: Wednesday in the Gwynne

Wednesday, Sept. 18, in the Gywnne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review features 21 presentations, including Utilizing Aquaculture for Conservation (10:30–11 a.m.), Forages for the Extremes—Drought and Flood Tolerant Options (12:30–1 p.m.), The Future of Oak Is in Our Hands (2–2:30 p.m.), and The Basics of Tree Identification (2–3 p.m.). See the full schedule.

Farm Science Review continues through Thursday, Sept. 19, at CFAES’ Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio.

The Gwynne Conservation Area is hosting free talks and other activities—on topics related to woods, wildlife, aquatics, and forages and grazing—on all three days of the event.

Keeping deer out: Tuesday in the Gwynne

The 17 free sessions set for Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Farm Science Review’s Gywnne Conservation Area include Landscaping for Wildlife (10­–10:30 a.m.), The Exclusion Solution—Mesh Fence to Protect Plantings from Deer (noon to 1 p.m.), Soil Testing to Increase Yields (1:30–2 p.m.), and Things You Should Know Before Selling Your Timber (2-3 p.m.). See the full schedule.

The Review runs from Sept. 17–19 at CFAES’ Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio.

The Gwynne Conservation Area is hosting free talks and other activities—on topics related to woods, wildlife, aquatics, and forages and grazing—on all three days of the event. (Photo: White-tailed deer, Getty Images.)

Spend 2 days in the woods this week

The ongoing A Day in the Woods series, co-sponsored by CFAES’ OSU Extension outreach arm, is hosting two events this week. Timber Harvesting: Things to Consider, Friday, Sept. 13, at the Zaleski State Forest CCC Camp in McArthur, provides details on timber sales, pricing, and meeting financial and environmental goals. The $12 registration fee includes lunch and materials.

The kid-friendly Family Day in the Woods, set for Saturday, Sept. 14, in Vinton Furnace State Forest, also in McArthur, features hands-on activities, a hay ride through the forest, interactive booths, details on local wildlife, and more. Free admission.

Click on the links for more information.

Come help celebrate Humboldt

Activities set for Sept. 13–14 in CFAES’ Secrest Arboretum in Wooster will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Alexander von Humboldt—explorer, geographer, and visionary naturalist whose thinking influenced Darwin. Included will be the Ohio premiere of a play called “Humboldt Unbound.” It’s all free and open to the public. Explore more here and here. (Image: Alexander von Humboldt by Joseph Karl Stieler via Wikimedia Commons.)