Rising seas threaten Bangladeshi farmers

Rising seas caused by climate change are making soils salty, and that could force about 200,000 coastal farmers in Bangladesh inland as glaciers continue to melt into the world’s oceans. So says a recent study co-led by CFAES scientist Joyce Chen (pictured), as reported by Ohio State science writer Misti Crane. Read the story.

Ahead to a resilient, sustainable future

Mark your calendar for Ohio State’s second annual Community Engagement Conference, set for Jan. 23-24 in Columbus. The theme: “Partnering for a Resilient and Sustainable Future.” Former Irish president Mary Robinson will be the keynote speaker. CFAES’s OSU Extension outreach arm is one of the event’s sponsors. Find out more and register.

How to ID Ohio’s aquatic invasive species

Want some good cold-weather reading? Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program offers a 160-page PDF e-book called Ohio Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive Species, with color photos for identifying aquatic invasive species and tips for preventing their introduction and spread. Featured are fish, plants, algae, mussels, crustaceans and others, including bighead carp, silver carp, didymo (an alga also called “rock snot”), fishhook waterflea, red swamp crayfish and Eurasian watermilfoil, to name just a few.

Ohio Sea Grant Specialist Tory Gabriel and Eugene Braig, CFAES aquatic ecosystems program director, helped produce the guide, whose introduction says, “Identifying and preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species are the keys to averting long-term ecosystem damage and ensuring the highest probability of effective control.”

Find details and links for downloading the guide.

‘What kind of world is this when a biologist needs to be scared to tell the truth?’

CFAES’s 2018 Environmental Film Series continues at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19, with “A River Below.” It’s the story of two South American activists’ attempts to use media coverage to help save the endangered Amazon River dolphin, but who face ethical and moral issues along the way.

“What sacrifices are acceptable in the battle for this endangered animal, and what are the grander social, economical and environmental issues involved?” Cara Cusumano, Tribeca Film Festival programming director, asks in writing about the film on the festival’s website. “Mark Grieco’s surprising documentary digs into the ethics of activism in the modern media age.”

Watch the trailer above. Get full details about the screening.

Join the conversation about soil balancing

The next “Soil Balancing Call-in Conversation,” organized by CFAES’s Organic Food and Farming Education and Research program, is today, Wednesday, Nov. 14, from 1:30-3 p.m. The theme is “Soil Balancing: What Do the Numbers Say About Its Effects on Soils, Crops, Weeds and Farms?” There’s still time to register to participate.

The third conversation in the series, called “Soil Balancing: The Questions Matter,” is set for Dec. 12.

Download the flyer for the series.

A deeper look at elevated phosphorus

Some farm fields have more phosphorus than their crops need. Called elevated phosphorus fields, such fields may be at higher risk of contributing to Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms.

That’s the premise of a new five-year study, based in northwest Ohio’s Maumee River watershed, that hopes to better understand those fields. How much phosphorus, an algal bloom-fueling nutrient, runs off of them? What are the best ways to limit that runoff while also maintaining yields?

CFAES scientist Jay Martin is leading the study, which is partnering with some of the watershed’s nutrient service providers and farmers.

Read the full story. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Are harmful algal blooms making people sick?

The 2018 Environmental Film Series sponsored by CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources continues tonight, Monday, Nov. 5, with “Toxic Puzzle,” a look at how harmful algal blooms may be affecting human health, specifically as possible triggers for Lou Gehrig’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Watch the trailer above.

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