CFAES sustainability news, Aug. 30, 2021

Where have fireflies gone?

Youngstown Vindicator, Aug. 23; featuring Dave Shetlar, CFAES Department of Entomology

Hundreds of U.S. cities adopted climate plans. Few have met the goals, but it’s not too late.

USA Today, Aug. 10; featuring Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension

‘Stinkweed’ could be used for green jet fuel

Bio Market Insights, Aug. 9; featuring Ajay Shah, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering

Tour Great Lakes fish farms virtually

Ohio Sea Grant, which is part of CFAES, and the Great Lakes Aquaculture Collaborative will host a free public webinar called Great Lakes Aquaculture Days from Aug. 31 to Sept. 2. The program offers virtual tours of farms around the region and Q&A sessions with the farmers and Sea Grant specialists. Find out more. (Photo: Yellow perch, CFAES.)

I feel the need … the need for stinkweed

A common farm weed called field pennycress, also known as stinkweed, could be farmed to make a cleaner bio-jet fuel.

That’s according to a recent study whose senior author is Ajay Shah, an associate professor in the CFAES Department of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering.

Read the story. (Photo: Field pennycress by Mary Ellen (Mel) Harte, Bugwood.org.)

‘Know more, waste less’

“As future leaders in the food and agriculture industry, we believe it is our social responsibility to consume and produce food in a conscientious manner.”

So says CFAES PhD student Aishwarya Badiger in our latest CFAES Story, which looks at her work with Know Food Waste, an award-winning CFAES student group.

Read the story.

CFAES sustainability news, May 12, 2021

New York Times, May 5; featuring Marne Titchenell, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Toledo Blade (subscription required), May 2; Ohio State and CFAES research mentioned

Akron Beacon Journal, April 11; featuring Jeff Reutter, special advisor, Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Lab

REALLY tiny bubbles could help fight algal blooms

New technology using something called nanobubbles—tiny gas bubbles that are several thousand times smaller than a grain of sand—could help fight Ohio’s harmful algal blooms. Testing, with CFAES as a partner, is about to begin.

“This could be a game-changer for small lakes and reservoirs,” said Heather Raymond, director of the CFAES Water Quality Initiative.

Read the story. (Photo: Getty Images.)

America’s forests as climate solutions

In America’s fight to reduce carbon emissions, expanding and better managing the nation’s forests would be the cheapest and easiest steps to take.

That’s according to new research by CFAES’ Brent Sohngen, who is slated as one of eight speakers—from academia, government agencies, advocacy groups, and multiple states—in a free public webinar titled “The Economics of U.S. Forests as a Natural Climate Solution.”

Set for April 29, noon to 2 p.m., the webinar is a joint program by CFAES, North Carolina State University, the University of Maine, the University of Idaho, and the International Union of Forest Research Organizations.

Read more about the webinar and Sohngen’s research.

Register for the webinar. (Photo: Getty Images.)

CFAES sustainability news, March 22, 2021

As millions go hungry, here’s how to reduce food waste in PA

Patch, March 19; research by Danyi Qi and Brian Roe, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, cited

Free gardening webinar series geared toward plant lovers with physical limitations

Wooster Daily Record, March 18; featuring Laura Akgerman and Pam Bennett, OSU Extension