America’s forests as climate solutions

In America’s fight to reduce carbon emissions, expanding and better managing the nation’s forests would be the cheapest and easiest steps to take.

That’s according to new research by CFAES’ Brent Sohngen, who is slated as one of eight speakers—from academia, government agencies, advocacy groups, and multiple states—in a free public webinar titled “The Economics of U.S. Forests as a Natural Climate Solution.”

Set for April 29, noon to 2 p.m., the webinar is a joint program by CFAES, North Carolina State University, the University of Maine, the University of Idaho, and the International Union of Forest Research Organizations.

Read more about the webinar and Sohngen’s research.

Register for the webinar. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Learn to identify Ohio’s mushrooms

April is mushroom season in Ohio, and you can learn about more than 140 different types—Which ones are good to eat? Which ones could kill you?—in a full-color handbook published by OSU Extension, CFAES’ outreach arm. Titled Mushrooms and Macrofungi of Ohio and the Midwestern States (166 pp.), it’s available in print ($20) and as a PDF ($8.50).

CFAES sustainability news, April 9, 2021

Floating gardens as a way to keep farming despite climate change

Ohio State News, March 31

Ohio bill seeks to deregulate state’s streams, wetlands and ponds

WKBN-TV, Youngstown, March 31; featuring Mažeika Sullivan, School of Environment and Natural Resources and director, Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park

Weed-free gardens organically?

Cathy Herms, manager of the Weed Lab at CFAES Wooster, presents “Organic Weed Control for the Home or Small Plot” at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 7, in the Organic Food and Farming Education and Research program’s winter webinar series.

“There’s no magic cure for weeds,” the event description says, “but there are biological principles that can guide your approach to weed management and help you avoid chemical solutions.”

Participating in the webinar is free and open to the public.

Find details and the login link.

Just how polluted are some urban soils, and how can organic farming help them?

CFAES scientist Larry Phelan presents “Remediation of Post-Industrial Urban Soils by Organic Management”—based on soil health research in vacant lots in Cleveland—from 11–11:45 a.m. Wednesday, March 31.

His talk is part of the free public winter webinar series by CFAES’ Organic Food and Farming Education and Research program.

Learn more and get the log-in details (scroll down).

CFAES sustainability news, March 22, 2021

As millions go hungry, here’s how to reduce food waste in PA

Patch, March 19; research by Danyi Qi and Brian Roe, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, cited

Free gardening webinar series geared toward plant lovers with physical limitations

Wooster Daily Record, March 18; featuring Laura Akgerman and Pam Bennett, OSU Extension

What research shows about how to improve soil health

CFAES’ Organic Food and Farming Education and Research (OFFER) program hosts a free public webinar, “Management Practices That Impact Soil Health and Organic Matter,” by Christine Sprunger, assistant professor in the CFAES School of Environment and Natural Resources, at 11 a.m. Wednesday, March 17. It’s part of a weekly series by OFFER. Learn more.

CFAES launching sustainable ag major

CFAES is launching a four-year degree program in sustainable agriculture. The new major, which will lead to a bachelor of science in agriculture, starts fall semester 2021.

“Our graduates will have practical skills, be problem solvers, and systems thinkers—the qualities needed for success in many careers and that will help them make the changes in the world we’re all hoping for,” said Casey Hoy, holder of CFAES’ W.K. Kellogg Foundation Endowed Chair in Agricultural Ecosystems Management. Hoy led the team that created the major.

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Sustaining health through what we eat

“It’s important that health-promoting foods be accessible and prevalent in the American diet.”

So says CFAES scientist Jessica Cooperstone, who’s using her multiple areas of expertise—plant breeding and genetics, analytical chemistry, bioinformatics, and nutrition—to try to develop even healthier tomatoes for people to grow and eat.

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