Making homes for pollinators

Pollinators — butterflies, bees and others — are key to farming, gardening and healthy diets. But globally, unfortunately, their populations are declining. Learn and see ways to help them, especially by growing the plants they need, in an expert talk called “Pollinator Habitat” in the Gwynne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review. It’s set for noon to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20.

See the full Gwynne schedule. The Review overall runs from Sept. 18-20. (Photo: Monarch butterfly, Getty Images.)

Hello, friend; or, Froggy went a-helpin’

CFAES wildlife specialist Marne Titchenell presents “Common Frogs and Snakes of Ohio” from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in the Gwynne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review. It’s a look at your small, shy, helpful neighbors — American toads, green frogs, garter snakes and others — and the good they do for farms, yards and gardens. See the full Gwynne schedule. (Photo: Leopard frog, Getty Images.)

Details on deer disease in Ohio

In August, parts of Tuscarawas and Holmes counties in northern Ohio were declared Disease Surveillance Areas for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), a fatal, easily spreadable illness of deer, elk, moose and caribou.

What does the declaration mean for deer farmers and deer hunters in those areas? What does the disease threat mean for Ohio hunters in general, including those who may travel to hunt in other states or in Canada?

Get answers to those questions in “Chronic Wasting Disease in White Tailed Deer,” a talk from 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Gwynne Conservation Area at next week’s CFAES-sponsored Farm Science Review.

See the full Gwynne schedule. (Photo: White-tailed deer, Getty Images.)

Weather or not to apply fertilizer

(Photo: Getty Images)

Using real-time precipitation forecasts and historical climate data, Ohio State’s new Field Application Resource Monitor (FARM) website tells you the best times to apply fertilizer and manure, based on your exact location. It can tell you whether rain is coming that could wash your fertilizer or manure away. Avoiding that washing-away can benefit your crops, your costs and water quality. Check out the site.

Ohio chainsaw non-massacre

Millions of ash trees are dead in Ohio, victims of the emerald ash borer pest. Which means millions of chances exist for Ohioans to cut the trees down using chainsaws. Fortunately, demonstrations in the Gwynne Conservation Area at CFAES’s upcoming Farm Science Review, sawdust flying, will show how to do it safely and right. “Chainsaw Maintenance: Sharpening and Safety,” 11 a.m. to noon on all three days of the Review, Tuesday, Sept. 18, Wednesday, Sept. 19, and Thursday, Sept. 20. “Chainsaw Cutting Techniques,” 12:30-1:30 p.m., also all three days. See the full Gwynne schedule.

Wildlife K-9 demos

See demonstrations by Ohio’s first-ever wildlife K-9 program in the Gwynne Conservation Area at CFAES’s upcoming Farm Science Review. The dogs in the program are trained to sniff out poached wildlife, fish and ginseng, and gun powder and lost hunters, too. Their handlers are wildlife officers with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife, which started the program this yearTuesday, Sept. 18, 10:30-11 a.m., 1:30-2 p.m. Farm Science Review overall is Sept. 18-20. More Gwynne activities.

Working to clean up Lake Erie

The tweet above references the first hearing of the Toward a Cleaner Lake Erie Working Group, a bipartisan effort aimed at discussing ways to fight Lake Erie’s algal blooms. It took place at the Ohio Statehouse Tuesday.

Cathann A. Kress, as you may know, is CFAES’s dean. You can follow her on Twitter at @cathannkress.

Chris Winslow, director of Ohio Sea Grant and CFAES’s Stone Lab on Lake Erie, also spoke at the hearing.

Save the date for Stinner Summit

CFAES’s 2018 Stinner Summit, an annual event inspired by Ben Stinner, the late CFAES scientist who specialized in sustainable agriculture, is set for Friday, Oct. 12, at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, located in Delaware just north of Columbus. This year’s theme: “The Roles of Faith and Ecology in Sustaining Agriculture.” 

Stinner led CFAES’s Agroecosystems Management Program (AMP), the host of the event, until his death in 2004. AMP’s website says he had the “rare ability to build relationships based on common interests and his vision, passion and commitment to building healthy agroecosystems and communities.”

Learn more about him and about the event.