Workshop: How to grow the bioeconomy in uncertain times

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, the bioeconomy is facing challenges.

On Tuesday, Dec. 8, from 9 a.m. to noon, The Ohio State University’s annual Advanced BioSystems Workshop will look at those challenges and will brainstorm ways for technology, research, and the government to address them.

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Join new student org to work for food justice

CFAES animal sciences major and Eminence Fellow Elena McGoey recently shared details about a new Ohio State student organization. Called Cultivate Columbus, the group “aims to connect Ohio State students with local communities to develop innovative and sustainable solutions for food justice in Columbus.”

The group’s mission, she said, “is to promote sustainable practices, nourish communities, and enhance food security.”

To find out more and to join the group’s mission, follow @cultivatecbus on Instagram or visit go.osu.edu/cultivatecolumbus.

CFAES sustainability news, Nov. 9, 2020

Climate change greater threat to human life than nuclear holocaust, warn experts

Kashmir Images (India), Nov. 1; featuring Rattan Lal, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Researchers narrow down causes of Lake Erie algae blooms in 2020 review

WNWO-TV, Toledo, Oct. 28; featuring Chris Winslow, Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory)

‘One extreme after another’: Climate change forces region’s ag sector to adjust practices

Farm and Dairy, Oct. 22; featuring Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension

CFAES sustainability news, Nov. 4, 2020

Reforest to stop drought-flood syndrome, says World Food Prize laureate Rattan Lal

Forests News, Oct. 19; featuring Rattan Lal, School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR)

From bin to beach: The realities of plastic waste and the Great Lakes region

Waste 360, Oct. 16; featuring Jill Bartolotta, Ohio Sea Grant

Soil health the focus of World Food Prize winner’s research

Radio Iowa, Oct. 15; featuring Rattan Lal, SENR

So you’ve got an old pumpkin to get rid of …

Pumpkins rotting in landfills produce methane, a climate change-causing greenhouse gas, and an especially scary one at that—it’s 20 times stronger than carbon dioxide.

So, if you don’t send your old pumpkin out in the trash, destined for burial in a landfill, what’s the best thing you can do with it?

We talked to three experts from CFAES for options. Spoiler alert: Sometimes (dun dun dun) they come back.

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Take 1:55 to learn to make your own kale chips

Got lots of leafy green kale? Discover a good, simple way you can eat it in the new CFAES video above.

“Kale is a healthy fall vegetable that can keep growing deep into cold weather,” says Tim McDermott, who produced the video with Jenny Lobb. Both of them work for OSU Extension, CFAES’ outreach arm.

“Kale chips are a crunchy snack that are easy to make, are full of vitamins, calcium, iron, and fiber, and are a delicious way to enjoy your harvest.”

Read more on growing food in fall in a previous post with McDermott.

‘As goes the soil, so goes humanity’

CFAES last week honored its own Rattan Lal, 2020 World Food Prize Laureate, with a video retrospective of his life and career, which you can watch above. Lal is Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science in the School of Environment and Natural Resources.

The video includes the announcement that Lal’s name is being added to the center that he founded—what will now be called the Rattan Lal Carbon Management and Sequestration Center.

You can watch the World Food Prize award ceremony itself, which the World Food Prize Foundation hosted on Oct. 15, here.