What do Americans think about wildlife?

By Mary Guiden, Science Writer and Senior Public Relations Specialist, Colorado State University

Abundant and healthy wildlife populations are a cultural and ecological treasure in the United States. Over time, however, decisions about how agencies manage wildlife have become highly contested: How should managers handle human-wildlife conflict, endangered species restoration, and predator control?

A new 50-state study called America’s Wildlife Values—the largest and first of its kind—describes individuals’ values toward wildlife across states. Leading the study were researchers from Colorado State and Ohio State, including Alia Dietsch and Jeremy Bruskotter of CFAES’ School of Environment and Natural Resources.

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Student club watching, protecting campus birds

“A club at The Ohio State University is working to tackle the problem of birds colliding head-on with building windows.” So begins our latest CFAES Story, which features CFAES’ Ornithology Club and was written by Yianni Sarris. Sarris is an Ohio State political science major and a student writer with CFAES’ Marketing and Communications unit.

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‘So many snakes!’—and that’s a good thing

If you’ve been to the Lake Erie islands lately, you’ve probably seen Lake Erie watersnakes, which were brought back from the brink of extinction—to the benefit of the islands’ natural systems—by scientists and volunteers with CFAES’ Stone Laboratory.

Learn more in the video above and in our latest CFAES Story.

It’s spring, peeps! Check out this workshop

The 2019 Ohio River Valley Woodland and Wildlife Workshop is later this week: it’s Saturday, March 30, at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana. It’s especially for woodland owners in Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky; features natural resource experts from those three states, including from CFAES (CFAES is one of the event’s organizers); and offers 13 sessions on interesting aspects of the trees and wildlife that live on your land.

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Spotlight on woods, water, wildlife

The annual Ohio Woodland, Water, and Wildlife Conference is for you if you work in natural resources, manage land, or both. The agenda features 15 expert-led sessions grouped in three tracks—woodlands, water, and wildlife—and is set for March 6 in Mansfield. Topics in the tracks range from managing tree galls to using drones, mitigating algal blooms to managing geese, conserving birds to helping bumble bees. Check out the full list of topics and speakers.

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Zoo animal behavior talk on tap

Wouter Stellaard, animal programs training director at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, presents “Zoo Animal Behavior and Training” from 5:30–6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 24, in the Animal Sciences Arena in the Animal Science Building on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. Admission is free and open to the public. The host is the Human-Animal Interactions Club, which is the undergraduate student arm of our college’s Center for Human-Animal Interactions Research and Education (or CHAIRE).

Find details.

Giving thanks for a most interesting bird

“The great size and beauty of the Wild Turkey, its value as a delicate and highly prized article of food, and the circumstance of its being the origin of the domestic race … render it one of the most interesting of the birds indigenous to the United States of America.” — naturalist and artist John James Audubon in his classic Birds of America, published in sections between 1827 and 1838.

Read Audubon’s full entry on the turkey.

Get the inside, outsized story on how Audubon’s epic tome came to be — what’s a double-elephant folio? — in writer Erin McCarthy’s “The Book So Big It Needed Its Own Furniture” published by Mental Floss. (Image by Audubon from the book, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.)

Hello, friend; or, Froggy went a-helpin’

CFAES wildlife specialist Marne Titchenell presents “Common Frogs and Snakes of Ohio” from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in the Gwynne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review. It’s a look at your small, shy, helpful neighbors — American toads, green frogs, garter snakes and others — and the good they do for farms, yards and gardens. See the full Gwynne schedule. (Photo: Leopard frog, Getty Images.)