CFAES sustainability news, July 23, 2021

National Geographic, July 22; featuring Mazeika Sullivan, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Marion Star, July 18; Whitney Gherman, OSU Extension

Cleveland.com, July 16; featuring Chris Winslow, Ohio Sea Grant, Stone Laboratory

CFAES sustainability news, July 1, 2021

How to protect species and save the planet—at once

Wired, June 10; featuring Daniela Miteva, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics

Bill seeks to overturn protections for ephemeral streams; experts say water quality will suffer

Columbus Dispatch, June 2; featuring Mazeika Sullivan, School of Environment and Natural Resources and director, Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park

CFAES sustainability news, May 28, 2021

Nature can save humanity from climate doom—but not on its own

Wired, May 25; featuring Daniela Miteva, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics

Appreciate, don’t fear, the ‘bugs of history’

Farm and Dairy, May 24; featuring Joe Boggs, OSU Extension

Scientists urge restoration of federal gray wolf protections

Associated Press and Holland (Michigan) Sentinel, May 15; featuring Jeremy Bruskotter, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Come join us in celebration

Today, March 3, is World Wildlife Day—a day, its website says, “to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild animals and plants.”

So, what’s your favorite wild animal or plant, and why—whether in Ohio, North America, or anywhere on the planet? Write your answer in “Leave a comment.”

Me, I’ll keep it close to home and split my vote for two locals—the familiar eastern fox squirrel and the stolid, beatific American toad, the first wild animals I got to know well as a kid growing up in the suburbs.

(Photo: Getty Images.)

If it walks like a …

Ohio’s coronavirus stay-at-home order continues through at least May 1. So you just might be noticing some busy new co-workers when you look out your dining room window from your “desk.” Let’s meet a few of them.

You might see me if you have a pond, stream, wetland, or retention basin near your home. I’m a fast flyer, good waddler, strong paddler, loud quacker. During my mating season, which is going on right now in Ohio, the males of my species (pictured on the right)—sometimes called “greenheads”—look a lot different than the females (pictured on the left), a low-key brown. I’m the duck you’re most likely to meet in North America. I’m …

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If I were a carpenter …

Ohio’s coronavirus stay-at-home order continues through at least May 1. So you just might be noticing some busy new co-workers when you look out your dining room window from your “desk.” Let’s meet a few of them.

You might think I’m a bumble bee. I’m big like one. But my back end is smooth and shiny black, while a bumble bee’s is hairy and black and yellow. Our females make nests by boring into wood. It’s how we get our name. Our males are territorial and protective. They’ll hover and buzz around up in your grill if you get too close to their nests. But it’s a case of all buzz and no bite. The males don’t have a stinger; they’re harmless. I’m a valuable native pollinator of plants who some call a “gentle giant.” I’m …

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Sing, sing a song, sing it loud, sing it strong

Ohio’s coronavirus stay-at-home order continues through at least May 1. So you just might be noticing some busy new co-workers when you look out your dining room window from your “desk.” Let’s meet a few of them.

You might see me skulking on the ground, under shrubs, under your bird feeder, scratching and kicking for things to eat. Sometimes I kick using both feet at once. That said, you might also see me out in the open, at the end of a branch or the top of tree, with my head thrown back, singing loudly. There’s a special connection between me—and more specifically, a groundbreaking life-history study of me—and a woman scientist who lived in Columbus 100 years ago. I’m …

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You can call me Ray, or you can call me …

Ohio’s coronavirus stay-at-home order continues through at least May 1. So you just might be noticing some busy new co-workers when you look out your dining room window from your “desk.” Let’s meet a few of them.

My cousins include crows, ravens, and magpies, but only crows and members of my species are common in Ohio. Together, we’re some of the smartest birds in the world, if I may be so bold to say (and bold is something I tend to be). I’m a helpful alarm system for other birds, calling “Jeer! Jeer!” and so on loudly when a predator like a hawk comes around. I tend to prefer living in woods with oak trees. But I’ve also adapted to living, say, in parks and your own backyard. Thanks for those sunflower seeds, by the way. There’s a Canadian baseball team named after me. I’m …

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