Learning from what’s in the can

Ohio State student employees are digging through garbage cans full of thrown-away food — messy, sloppy, smelly, tossed food — in the name of sustainability. They’re helping with food waste audits being done to help the university try to meet one of its sustainability goals: diverting 90 percent of its waste from landfills by 2025. Read the full story.

In the meantime, researchers will share results from the audits at Ohio State’s Oct. 11 Food Waste Collaborative Conference, which CFAES is sponsoring. Glean further details on the conference’s website, including a link to register.

If buried in a landfill, discarded food rots and produces methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Limiting landfilled food waste reduces that methane production and in turn helps slow human-caused climate change.

Doing good work for students and water

Check out a recent story by Ben Gelber of Columbus TV station WCMH, which looks at an effort by Ohio State, the Hilliard school district and several conservation agencies to get high school students’ feet wet in environmental science.

The project involves, among others, members of CFAES’s TerrAqua student club and Eugene Braig, aquatic ecosystems program director, who’s interviewed briefly in the video. He’s the subject of a recent profile on our CFAES Stories website.

Registration open for Stinner Summit

Registration is open for this year’s Stinner Summit, set for Friday, Oct. 12, in Delaware, north of Columbus. Hosted by CFAES’s Agroecosystems Management Program (AMP), the annual event brings together people interested in sustainable agriculture and sustainable communities; working together, they brainstorm, develop and decide projects to be funded by AMP’s Ben Stinner Endowment for Healthy Agroecosystems and Sustainable Communities.

Registration is free and open to the public. Lunch is included.

Find out more and register online.

Blue birds? Happiness

Members of the Greater Mohican Audubon Society lead a guided bird walk from 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, in CFAES’s Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, home to species like the indigo bunting shown here.

Admission is free and open to the public. Find out more. (Photo: Getty Images.)