Invasive species in your woods and how you can stop them

Register by Wednesday, Oct. 11, for the Forest Health: Invasive Species workshop being offered by CFAES’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. It’s from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 18 at the Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina, part of the Medina County Park District.

The event, which is for landowners, gardeners and others, will look at the invasive plants, diseases and insects bugging Ohio; how to identify and monitor them; the harm they do to woods and wildlife if left unchecked; and options for controlling them.

Registration is $35. (Photo: European buckthorn, T. Davis Sydnor, Ohio State, Bugwood.org.)

‘It’s important to find new ways of slowing deforestation’

When residents take charge of their rainforests, fewer trees get the ax, says a story by Ohio State’s University Communications office, detailing a study done in Guatemala by CFAES researchers.

Pictured left to right are co-authors Brent Sohngen and Douglas Southgate, both of CFAES’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, and Lea Fortman, now of the University of Puget Sound who worked on the study as a graduate student. (Photo courtesy of Brent Sohngen.)

Sssselebrities to follow on Twitter

Follow Skeate, Arwen, Hermione and Mr. Darcy, among others — radiotagged timber rattlesnakes living in southeast Ohio woods — on the @TimberTweets Twitter feed by CFAES’s Peterman Lab. Lab staff are tracking the secretive snakes, an Ohio endangered species, to see how forest management affects them. Venomous but shy, with a taste for eating small rodents (including ones spreading Lyme disease), timber rattlers help ecosystems and, quietly, people.

Lab head Bill Peterman, assistant professor in CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, says, “I’ve had a passion for amphibians and reptiles since I was a kid catching frogs and snakes.” He’s in the video above.

Learn how to cut down a tree safely, and actually get to do it

When it comes to using a chainsaw, there are things you want to cut, like any of Ohio’s millions of still-standing dead ash trees killed by the emerald ash borer pest, and things you don’t want to cut, like … anything not a tree.

A class you can take on Aug. 3 will help you keep them straight. (Photo: iStock.)

Thursday: Saving Ohio’s hemlocks

Dave Apsley, natural resources specialist with CFAES’s outreach arm, OSU Extension, presents “Ohio’s Eastern Hemlock Forests and the Threat of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 2, in Ashland University’s 2016-17 Environmental Lecture Series. Details. (Photo: Eastern hemlock, Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org.)