What you can see on a Day in the Woods

You’re invited to come see, hear and learn about breeding birds at a program in southeast Ohio’s Vinton Furnace State Forest on Friday, June 8. It’s part of the A Day in the Woods series co-sponsored by CFAES’s Ohio State University Extension outreach arm and a number of partners. Hours are 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Registration is $12. Learn more.

Fun fact: The beautiful cerulean warbler, pictured, an Ohio species of concern, is among the birds breeding in the area. (Photo: iStock.)

CFAES’s celebrity snakes are back tweeting

Warm weather’s here, and the rattlesnake stars of the @TimberTweets feed — Jimbo, Hope, et al — are back, active and tweeting. Follow their rarely seen daily lives in the woods of southern Ohio. It’s all in the name of research being done by CFAES’s Peterman Lab. Fun fact (unless you’re a rodent or a tick): Timber rattlesnakes eat rodents that carry Lyme disease ticks. (Photo: iStock.)

These CFAES courses are on fire (sign up!)

Hey, Ohio State students: The courses described in this story are taught during Autumn Semester. Course enrollment for Autumn Semester 2018 begins at the end of March and runs through mid- to late April. So sign up soon if you’re interested!

Students at The Ohio State University have a unique opportunity to take a two-course sequence that culminates with a real prescribed burn and certification.

The courses, offered by CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR), teach about fire ecology, fire’s role in ecosystems, and managing controlled and wild fires. In the end, students prepare for and conduct a prescribed burn. Continue reading

On St. Patrick’s Day, the carin’ for the green

The annual Ohio River Valley Woodland and Wildlife Workshop, aimed at landowners in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana but also for anyone else interested in conservation, is on March 17 near Cincinnati. CFAES is one of its sponsors. Read more about it. (Photo: Red trillium, Joshua Moore, iStock.)

Invasive species in your woods and how you can stop them

Register by Wednesday, Oct. 11, for the Forest Health: Invasive Species workshop being offered by CFAES’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. It’s from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 18 at the Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina, part of the Medina County Park District.

The event, which is for landowners, gardeners and others, will look at the invasive plants, diseases and insects bugging Ohio; how to identify and monitor them; the harm they do to woods and wildlife if left unchecked; and options for controlling them.

Registration is $35. (Photo: European buckthorn, T. Davis Sydnor, Ohio State, Bugwood.org.)

‘It’s important to find new ways of slowing deforestation’

When residents take charge of their rainforests, fewer trees get the ax, says a story by Ohio State’s University Communications office, detailing a study done in Guatemala by CFAES researchers.

Pictured left to right are co-authors Brent Sohngen and Douglas Southgate, both of CFAES’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, and Lea Fortman, now of the University of Puget Sound who worked on the study as a graduate student. (Photo courtesy of Brent Sohngen.)

Sssselebrities to follow on Twitter

Follow Skeate, Arwen, Hermione and Mr. Darcy, among others — radiotagged timber rattlesnakes living in southeast Ohio woods — on the @TimberTweets Twitter feed by CFAES’s Peterman Lab. Lab staff are tracking the secretive snakes, an Ohio endangered species, to see how forest management affects them. Venomous but shy, with a taste for eating small rodents (including ones spreading Lyme disease), timber rattlers help ecosystems and, quietly, people.

Lab head Bill Peterman, assistant professor in CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, says, “I’ve had a passion for amphibians and reptiles since I was a kid catching frogs and snakes.” He’s in the video above.