Come study woodland fungus amongus

CFAES’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program holds a workshop called Fascinating Woodland Fungi on Friday, Oct. 12, on Ohio State’s Mansfield campus.

Registration is $35 and includes lunch and handouts. Register by Friday, Oct. 5.

Unearth more details and register online. (Photo: Jack- o’-lantern mushrooms, beautiful but not to be eaten, Getty Images.)

Learn to ID trees so you can care for them better

Knowing how to correctly identify trees is a key part of diagnosing any problems you might with them, such as pests or diseases.

So says the flier for Nature vs. Nurture Tree ID, an upcoming workshop taught by CFAES’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. It’s set for Wednesday, Oct. 3 in CFAES’s Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, and you need to register by Wednesday, Sept. 26. Registration is $35 and includes lunch and materials. There will be indoor and outdoor sessions, so dress for the weather.

Find details and register online. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Enjoy fall, see pollinators today at 2 pm

CFAES’s Secrest Arboretum hosts a Guided Autumn and Pollinator Walk from 2-3:30 p.m. today, Tuesday, Sept. 25, starting at its Seaman Orientation Plaza.

The arboretum is at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., part of CFAES’s Wooster campus. Free admission; dress for the weather (a chance of showers).

Find out more. (Photo: Common buckeye butterfly on goldenrod, Getty Images.)

Making homes for pollinators

Pollinators — butterflies, bees and others — are key to farming, gardening and healthy diets. But globally, unfortunately, their populations are declining. Learn and see ways to help them, especially by growing the plants they need, in an expert talk called “Pollinator Habitat” in the Gwynne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review. It’s set for noon to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20.

See the full Gwynne schedule. The Review overall runs from Sept. 18-20. (Photo: Monarch butterfly, Getty Images.)

Hello, friend; or, Froggy went a-helpin’

CFAES wildlife specialist Marne Titchenell presents “Common Frogs and Snakes of Ohio” from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in the Gwynne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review. It’s a look at your small, shy, helpful neighbors — American toads, green frogs, garter snakes and others — and the good they do for farms, yards and gardens. See the full Gwynne schedule. (Photo: Leopard frog, Getty Images.)

Ohio chainsaw non-massacre

Millions of ash trees are dead in Ohio, victims of the emerald ash borer pest. Which means millions of chances exist for Ohioans to cut the trees down using chainsaws. Fortunately, demonstrations in the Gwynne Conservation Area at CFAES’s upcoming Farm Science Review, sawdust flying, will show how to do it safely and right. “Chainsaw Maintenance: Sharpening and Safety,” 11 a.m. to noon on all three days of the Review, Tuesday, Sept. 18, Wednesday, Sept. 19, and Thursday, Sept. 20. “Chainsaw Cutting Techniques,” 12:30-1:30 p.m., also all three days. See the full Gwynne schedule.

Wildlife K-9 demos

See demonstrations by Ohio’s first-ever wildlife K-9 program in the Gwynne Conservation Area at CFAES’s upcoming Farm Science Review. The dogs in the program are trained to sniff out poached wildlife, fish and ginseng, and gun powder and lost hunters, too. Their handlers are wildlife officers with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife, which started the program this yearTuesday, Sept. 18, 10:30-11 a.m., 1:30-2 p.m. Farm Science Review overall is Sept. 18-20. More Gwynne activities.

Working to clean up Lake Erie

The tweet above references the first hearing of the Toward a Cleaner Lake Erie Working Group, a bipartisan effort aimed at discussing ways to fight Lake Erie’s algal blooms. It took place at the Ohio Statehouse Tuesday.

Cathann A. Kress, as you may know, is CFAES’s dean. You can follow her on Twitter at @cathannkress.

Chris Winslow, director of Ohio Sea Grant and CFAES’s Stone Lab on Lake Erie, also spoke at the hearing.

What does it mean that Lake Erie’s ‘impaired’?

(Photo: Lake Erie algal bloom at Pelee Island, Ontario, 2009, by Tom Archer, Michigan Sea Grant, via Flickr.)

The Environmental Professionals Network, a statewide professional group organized by CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, holds its first monthly breakfast program of the 2018-19 academic year, “The Lake Erie Impairment Designation: What Does It Mean and What Can We Learn from Other Watersheds?” from 7:15-9:30 a.m. Sept. 11 on Ohio State’s Columbus campus.

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