Ohio Department of Agriculture: Dicamba Use in Ohio ends June 30, 2020

By: Peggy Hall, OSU Extension

The dicamba roller coaster ride continues today, with a statement issued by the Ohio Department of Agriculture clarifying that the use of XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan dicamba-based products in Ohio will end as of June 30, 2020.  Even though the US EPA has issued an order allowing continued use of the products until July 31, 2020, use in Ohio must end on June 30 because the Ohio registrations for the three dicamba-based products expire on that day.

As we’ve explained in our previous blog posts here and here, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the registration of the dicamba products on June 3, 2020.  In doing so, the court stated that the EPA had failed to perform a proper analysis of the risks and resulting costs of the products.  According to the court, EPA had substantially understated the amount of acreage damaged by dicamba and the extent of such damage, as well as complaints made to state agriculture departments.  The court determined that EPA had also entirely failed to acknowledge other risks, such as the risk of noncompliance with complex label restrictions, economic risks from anti-competition impacts created by the products, and the social costs to farm communities caused by dicamba versus non-dicamba users.  Rather than allowing the EPA to reconsider the registrations, the court vacated the product registrations altogether. Continue reading

Court Ruling on Dicamba Products for Xtend Soybeans

By: Mark Loux, OSU Extension

Article Updated on June 9, 2020 at 8:15 AM due to EPA statement Monday night.

As most readers are probably aware, last week, the US 9th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision in a case concerning the use of dicamba on Xtend soybeans.  This decision essentially voided the labels for XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan that allows use on soybeans.  Tavium was not included in this decision, because it was not approved for use when the case was initially filed.  Last week’s entry in the OSU Ag Law blog covers this decision well and can be found here.  EPA issued a statement Monday night, providing further guidance about what this decision means for the use of dicamba for the rest of this season, which can be found here.  The critical part of that is as follows:

“Details of the Order

EPA’s order addresses the sale, distribution, and use of existing stocks of the three affected dicamba products – XtendiMax with vapor grip technology, Engenia, and FeXapan.

  1. Distribution or sale by any person is generally prohibited except for ensuring proper disposal or return to the registrant.
  2. Growers and commercial applicators may use existing stocks that were in their possession on June 3, 2020, the effective date of the Court decision. Such use must be consistent with the product’s previously-approved label, and may not continue after July 31, 2020.”

The next most immediate question concerns the options for control of glyphosate-resistant weeds in Xtend soybeans, for those growers who have not already purchased their dicamba products, since the EPA info states that no additional sales can occur.  Tavium, the premix of s-metolachlor and dicamba with VaporGrip, was not part of this decision and remained an option.  Tavium can be applied through the V4 soybean stage, or through 45 days after planting, whichever occurs first.  Aside from this option, without the availability of dicamba to use POST, the Xtend soybean becomes just an old school Roundup Ready soybean.  Weeds of most significant concern here are marestail, waterhemp, Palmer amaranth, giant ragweed, and also common ragweed in NW Ohio.  The primary POST option would be a mix of glyphosate with an ALS inhibitor (Classic, FirstRate, etc.) or PPO inhibitor (Flexstar and generics, Cobra/Phoenix, Ultra Blazer).   However, these five weeds are mostly glyphosate and ALS resistant in Ohio, and PPO resistance is reasonably common in waterhemp and also occurs in some common ragweed and Palmer amaranth populations.  None of these mixtures will be effective for marestail control.  Effectiveness on the other weeds will be variable among and within fields across Ohio.  Some giant ragweed populations are still partially sensitive to glyphosate, so plant size and glyphosate rate and the number of applications make a difference.  We would expect a complete lack of waterhemp control in some fields.  A third option would be to replant Xtend soybean fields with another type of soybean that provides for the POST options of 2,4-D choline and/or glufosinate – Enlist, LibertyLink, or LLGT27 – should seed still be available.

The Iowa State University ICM blog (June 5) covered the issue of waterhemp control in the absence of dicamba:

Of the alternatives available, we believe a Group 14 herbicide (acifluorfen, fomesafen, lactofen) has a better chance of controlling waterhemp than glyphosate due to the greater prevalence of glyphosate-resistant waterhemp. Group 14 herbicides should be applied as soon as waterhemp is found in a field, and a Group 15 herbicide (acetochlor, dimethenamid, pyroxasulfone, S-metolachlor) should be included to provide residual control after the POST application. Glyphosate or other appropriate tank-mix partners should be included in the mix to broaden the spectrum of weeds controlled.

Preemergence herbicides appear to be providing effective control in most soybean fields at this time, but the timeliness of application of the Group 14 herbicide will be critical. Spraying waterhemp between 0.5 and 1.5 inches in height is ideal. Follow all recommendations on the Group 14 label to maximize effectiveness, including carrier volume, nozzle type, spray pressure, spray additives, and sprayer speed.”

 

Dicamba Takes Another Blow: Court of Appeals Vacates Dicamba Registration

By: Peggy Hall, OSU Extension

Dicamba has had its share of legal challenges, and a decision issued yesterday dealt yet another blow when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals  vacated the product’s registration with the U.S. EPA.  In doing so, the court held that the EPA’s approval of the registration violated the provisions of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (“FIFRA”), which regulates the use of herbicides and other chemicals in the U.S.  Here’s a summary of how the court reached its decision and a few thoughts on the uncertainty that follows the opinion.

The challenge:  EPA’s approval of three dicamba products Continue reading

Had Your Auxin Training Yet?

By: Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension agronomist

I just sat through my second training of the season. Labels changed for all of the soybean dicamba products last fall; and the label says you will attend dicamba training every year. That means everyone who uses a dicamba product on soybeans must attend auxin training from the manufacturer; contact your seed dealer or herbicide supplier to see when yours is happening. If you missed it for the product you are using, that’s OK, you can attend any of the manufacturers’ training sessions to get the update. Continue reading

Be Informed About 2019 Dicamba Requirements

By: Ohio Ag Net Staff, previously published by Ohio Ag Net

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is reminding farmers of revised labels and new training requirements for applicators who intend to use dicamba herbicide products this year. In October 2018, U.S. EPA approved revised labels for the three dicamba products that are labeled for use on soybeans: Engenia (BASF), XtendiMax (Monsanto) and FeXapan (DuPont).

“Like any other product, we want to ensure licensed applicators are properly following label directions as they get ready for this growing season,” said Matt Beal, chief of the ODA Division of Plant Health. “This not only helps ensure the safe use of pesticides, it also helps prevent misuse and mishandling.” Continue reading

Inversion and Drift Mitigation – Workshop on December 14

By: Cindy Folck, OSU Extension

Recognizing weather conditions that could cause inversions is important when using certain herbicides in corn and soybeans. On December 14, join a discussion about recognizing inversions as well as ways to improve communication between farmers growing sensitive crops and pesticide applicators.

Inversion and Drift Management Workshop, presented by the Ohio State University Extension IPM program will be conducted on December 14 from 10 a.m. to noon. Farmers and pesticide applicators can attend the workshop in-person at the Ohio Department of Agriculture, 8995 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 or attend virtually through the online webinar link. More information about the workshop is available at http://go.osu.edu/IPM Continue reading

Reminders About Dicamba

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

This is the time of year when we received our first call about dicamba problems in soybeans in 2017. We can probably expect any problems to become evident soon, based on the timing of postemergence applications and timeline for development of symptoms.

Off-target issues have already developed in states farther west and south, and we would expect at least some to occur here, unless we’re really lucky. The symptoms of dicamba injury show in new soybean growth within approximately 7 to 21 days after exposure, and most of our soybeans receive postemergence applications from early June on. Continue reading

Pay Attention to Nozzle Selection to Meet Label Requirements for the New 2,4-D and Dicamba Products

By Erdal Ozkan, Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, The Ohio State University

Generally, this is the time of the year you complete shopping for nozzles because the spraying season is just around the corner. This task must be on top of your to do list if you are one of those who will be applying the new 2,4-D or Dicamba products for crops that are resistant to these products.

According to a survey conducted by Farm Journal magazine and reported in its Mid-February issue, out of the 411 people they contacted (mostly in Midwest, including Ohio) 40% of them indicated they plan to grow dicamba-tolerant soybeans. About 11% indicated they are still undecided. Continue reading

Inversion and Drift Mitigation Workshop to be held April 10

By: Cindy Folck, OSU Extension

Do you know the weather conditions that contribute to inversions? A workshop on April 10 will focus on tools to help farmers recognize inversions and other weather conditions that affect pesticide drift, for example dicamba. Aaron Wilson, weather specialist and atmospheric scientist, will discuss weather trends and how to recognize inversions. Additionally, workshop attendees will learn about the new tools available through the Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry by Field Watch to increase communication between field crop and specialty crop growers. Continue reading