Bad Grade? Bounce Back in 5 Steps!

Now that the first round of midterms is almost over, you’ve probably started to get your first midterm grades back. If you didn’t do as well as you expected on an exam, don’t be discouraged! Taking college exams is not an easy task, especially if you’ve never taken one before. Now that you are more familiar of how an actual college exam works, let’s take some time to reflect on how you can improve the next time around!

Here are some tips that I have found helpful after getting a disappointing grade on a midterm.

Talk to your instructor

Stop by office hours and go over your exam with the instructor. This is really helpful because you’ll be able to go over your mistakes and find out why your answers were incorrect. Make sure to ask questions and always ask to clarify a topic that you do not completely understand. Your professors are always willing to give you guidance on how to approach their class, so don’t be afraid to reach out to them!

Develop new study habits

In high school, you may not have studied much for midterms. In college, studying may require hours at Thompson Library, memorizing pages of notes and study guides. This is not always the most effective way to study the material. In my time as a college student, I’ve learned that it’s not about how long you study, but rather how well you study. The Dennis Learning Center in the Younkin Success Center has several student resources for effective study skills. You can also attend Use Your Brain! Memory Tools for Effective Studying (register through the First Year Success Series) if you want to learn a new way to study!

Make use of the resources on campus

Ohio State has so many resources on campus. The university wants its students to succeed above and beyond and it is only fitting that we use these resources to our advantage. Check out these campus tutoring centers (if you haven’t already) for help with subjects that many students study in their first year.

Campus Tutoring

Hold yourself accountable

Too often we place the blame on the professor with a different accent, or on our friends for distracting us, but we need to be the one to take responsibility for the disappointing grade. Placing the blame on someone or something else is counterproductive because then you will never be able to recognize how you can do better in the future! If you do get a bad grade, it’s okay to be upset about it, but then try to find ways to improve yourself. The best way to deal with a bad grade is to put in the effort to do things differently and to strive even harder the next time for the grade you feel like you deserve.

Stay motivated

Getting your first bad grade on an exam can make you rethink a lot of things in life: your major, your career choice, and maybe even your time here at Ohio State. Don’t fret! Everyone struggles with staying motivated at one time or another…I know I still do! Just know that we can get through this together! I found this article about staying motivated in college to be helpful.

The most successful students are the ones who ask for help when they need it! Don’t be afraid to ask for help and support, whether it’s from your professor, your TA, your RA or even your Peer Leader. Just know that together, we are all here to help you pave your path to success! Stay positive, work hard and make it happen!

Life Unexpected

I decided I was going to attend The Ohio State University when I was in the third grade. I was nine years old, standing in my kitchen, clutching the USA Synchro magazine in my hand, and told my parents that is where I was going to college. Ohio State’s synchronized swimming team had come in second at collegiate nationals that year, and that was my sole reason for wanting to go to Ohio State. I worked for the rest of my elementary, middle, and high school career and synchro career gearing up to swim at Ohio State. I would dream about swimming in the McCorkle Aquatic Pavilion, my mom coming down for all my meets, becoming friends with all the girls on the team, and swimming amazing routines with beautiful suits.

In my senior year of high school, I just missed the deadline for recruiting and I sent in my video late, but the coaches said I could try out in the fall. On a Saturday in September, I woke up nervous and excited about my try out. As I swam for the coaches, the entire team watched me, wondering who I was. They clapped after I finished my routine and it made me feel like I was on top of the world. They said they would email me later that week letting me know if I made it. I was anxious that entire week. On Thursday, I opened my email and saw the first few lines of the message that said:

Sorry Libby. You were really close, but you didn’t make the team.

My entire life had been about swimming for Ohio State. I didn’t know what I was going to do. I didn’t want to transfer, because I had already made friends and connections to the campus. It would be too sad to leave, so I made the best of my situation. I decided to get involved in other activities.

I kept in touch with the synchro team and for the rest of my freshman year I was the team’s manager. They welcomed me with open arms and made me feel like part of the group. I stayed in Columbus over winter break and helped with winter training and traveled with them. After winter break I went through formal recruitment through Sorority and Fraternity Life and joined my home away from home, Delta Delta Delta. They quickly became my best friends and truly my sisters. I joined University Choir where we performed in two concerts on campus.

In my second year, I went on my first Buck-I-Serv trip to Biloxi, MS, where we helped those who had been affected by Hurricane Katrina. In May Term at the end of my second year, I studied the History, Culture, and Politics of Great Britain in London, England with an amazing group of Ohio State students.

In my third year, I went on my second Buck-I-Serv trip to Costa Rica, where we helped build a road and cleaned up a beach. During both my sophomore and junior years, I participated in BuckeyeThon to help raise money for Nationwide Children’s Hospital. I have also served as a recruitment guide for formal recruitment and helped 75 first- and second-year students find their homes. I also started working at the RPAC teaching swim lessons, which brought me back to the pool I thought I was going to spend many hours in.

My college career has been nothing like nine-year-old Libby imagined it to be, but I have loved every second of what it has become. I want everyone out there who worries that college is not going to be how they imagine to know that will not be; it’s going to be even better. No matter what experience comes your way, go with it and see where it takes you–it might become the most amazing adventure of your life.

FYE Peer Leader Myths

Whether you saw us at Orientation or at the library studying for an exam, FYE Peer Leaders are everywhere. As the wise Hannah Montana once said, “I’m a lucky [student] whose dreams came true, but underneath it all I’m just like you.” The best part of our role is that we are YOUR peers! We take classes, participate in student organizations, and eat in the dining halls–and, believe it or not, we were all first-year students at one point, too! We know what it’s like to complete your first big college exam and get chills, or question what to get involved with on campus. Let’s face it: college is hard, but we’re here to help you figure those hard things out because we all wish that we had a Peer Leader there for us during the low points of our first year as well. In order to continue building relationships and connecting with Peer Leaders, it is important to bust some myths about Peer Leaders.

MYTH: Peer Leaders are scary upperclass students

Peer Leaders are in fact anything but scary upperclass students. Whether you want to talk about dogs to relieve stress or have a serious conversation about missing your home, every single Peer Leader is here to lend an ear. We care about the well-being of every student and want to help each and every person have a successful first-year and beyond. Do not be afraid to say hi when you see us on the Oval or reach out to us if you want to chat! Peer Leaders are friends, not food (:

MYTH: I should strive to be just like the Peer Leaders

The only thing you should strive to be just like is yourself! Although the Peer Leaders are wonderful people, you should utilize their knowledge and resources to help you grow closer to the person you have always wanted to become. Discover the people and things that make you light up the same way each one of us lights up about the things we are passionate about.

MYTH: If I make a mistake, a Peer Leader will be disappointed in me

We have all made mistakes, trust me. I have made plenty of mistakes during my collegiate career and so has every other Peer Leader. The best feeling in the world when you make a mistake, however, is having someone tell you, “it’s okay”. That is exactly what we are here to do. We are not here to get you in trouble or instill our own values upon you, but rather love and support you through the best four–yet toughest–years of your life. Some of the greatest mistakes I have made here at Ohio State have in fact not been asking for help when I needed it most. No matter if you find support through your Peer Leader, family, friends, or other campus resources, make sure to have the courage to ask for help, because we all need somebody to lean on!

MYTH: Peer Leaders have it all together

This just might be the biggest myth of them all. I can 120 percent guarantee that each one of us is still trying to figure life out one day at a time, just like each of you. None of the Peer Leaders are perfect, and neither are you, but that’s okay! It makes us normal and unifies us as one Buckeye family! It is important to remember that even Ohio State’s greatest leaders do not have it all together, but together we have it all.

When these barriers come down and myths are broken, you can finally start to see us for who we truly are: not the cool students in a red polo, but rather a genuine friend and resource who wants nothing more than see you find happiness and success here at Ohio State!

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Stand Up to Peer Pressure: College Edition

MYTH: Peer pressure only exists in high school

When we graduate from high school, we don’t graduate from peer pressure. I remember thinking that if I could just make it out of high school, I would finally escape the peer pressure to drink, smoke, and hook up that was ever present, especially on weekends. The reality is that peer pressure is a class from which few of us ever graduate. I had such high expectations for college that it was a rude awakening to realize that peer pressure was stronger than ever.

peer pressure 3

In college, peer pressure is heightened because–unlike high school, where we could escape to our bedrooms to avoid some of what was going on–we can’t separate ourselves so easily from our peer groups. Instead of a sanctuary to which we can retreat, our residence hall rooms can be the scene of the peer pressure. For many Ohio State freshmen–away from home for the first time–the physical presence and the emotional and spiritual support of parents and siblings is greatly diminished. The friends who shaped our experiences have gone off in different directions and some have radically changed. These alterations to our support systems can be confusing, and challenge our ability to distinguish among the morals and values we thought we packed and brought along to college.

Why is it so hard to say no?

We all want to make friends, fit in, and be liked. The desire to feel like we are part of a group is completely normal, and most people feel this way their entire lives! We want to appear cool to a potential new friend, so we go along with our ‘friend’s’ request despite knowing that it is not the right choice. I know from experience that sometimes my values can be compromised, especially when I’m trying to escape the loneliness that comes from being with others who don’t share the same values and morals.

peer pressure 1

How can we effectively deal with peer pressure?

I’m a senior in college and I still struggle with peer pressure. From the glimpses I’ve gotten of the working world, I’ve learned that peer pressure isn’t going away any time soon. Developing the skills to effectively deal with peer pressure will be a lifelong benefit to us. I have gathered some of the strategies that I and my fellow Peer Leaders use to cope with peer pressure:

  • Educate yourself with the facts. Not everyone is drinking or having sex!
  • Have honest conversations before you are put in a situation where peer pressure may arise. Peer Leader Lauren has found that when she is up front with her friends about her decision not to consume alcohol, her friends respect her choice and don’t pressure her to compromise her values. Don’t be afraid to communicate your perspective with your roommates and friends and be open to listening to others’ perspectives. Good communication on your part about your values helps others know where you stand, and others will be less apt to pressure you to do things you don’t want to do.
  • Try not to rely too heavily on the approval of brand new friends. This is easier said than done. Give more weight to the opinions of those you hold dear than to the opinions of new acquaintances. When stuck on a decision, consult those who embody your values instead of someone who doesn’t.
  • Surround yourself with people who share similar values, especially when you’re still developing a sense of self. I didn’t know myself well enough in my first year to know that I needed friends who didn’t go out and party. I wish I would have realized that there is always someone who wants to watch Gossip Girl or go to Jeni’s for ice cream instead of go out to a bar.
  • Have an exit plan. If you are in a situation where you feel pressured to do something you don’t want to do, it’s perfectly okay to say you’re not feeling well or you have to go. You don’t owe anyone a long-winded explanation.
  • Find someone you trust to talk to when you have felt peer pressured. Debriefing is a good way to understand more about yourself. Perhaps you might have these conversations with your Peer Leader or RA :)

4 Ways to Find Success as an Underrepresented Student

Discussing cultural differences is a touchy subject for some people; however, we cannot pretend like they don’t exist. In fact, that is a part of the beauty of the Ohio State experience–the diversity on campus. Navigating the diversity and trying to find yourself in the midst of learning more about your social identity is tough, especially when managing other aspects of your life like your academics, social life, and mental stability.

College marks a time when you are by yourself facing challenges like doing your own laundry, keeping up with a rigorous course load, and exploring the college scene. For some, that may be manageable, but for others…not so much. For minority students it is all of the above…and then some. I believe that being a minority does not just apply to race but also ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, age, gender, or anything else that would imply that you are not among “the majority”. So, let’s make this topic a little more comfortable for all of us.

Here are four tips to make the Ohio State campus experience a little less worrisome for you:

Join an ethnic group.

Find a safe place among your peers–who may also struggle with being the minority–because they can be your best support system. Whether you are Black, Asian, Mexican, a woman, a member of the LGBTQ community, you are never alone! I hate to break it to you, but in this case, you are not unique (smiley face). Human nature suggests that we are most interested in meeting people just like ourselves, so take initiative and put yourself out there to find those people first. Keep in mind that the best friendships begin unexpectedly, and it can all start with one organization meeting.

Take elective classes that best suit you.

Ohio State serves a diverse population. Therefore, the classes that can be taken are limitless: African American studies courses, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality studies courses, Religious Studies courses–the list goes on and on. Those courses are not just taken by people who personally identify with the course subject matter or who agree completely with the ideas conveyed by the instructor and other students; they are meant to expose you to new concepts and ways of thinking, which ultimately help you in that journey to finding yourself. Even if you want to learn about other cultures (as opposed to your own identity), don’t hesitate to take it–you are supposed to explore in college, and the possibilities here are endless!

Chill out.

Assume positive intent at all times. There is no need to be overly sensitive or constantly on edge because someone may or may not have offended you. Have a light heart and take some things with a grain of salt. While our differences are what make us awesome, try not to focus solely on that difference that you may have. Instead, focus on the similarities and common interests you share with others. There is so much more about you than what you identify as and so many ways to connect with other students.

Be proud!

Walk around with your head held high. Don’t be ashamed of who you are, and don’t let small things intimidate you from reaching your full potential. Embrace it! Sometimes I think the thought of reaching your full potential and being as great as you can be scares people. Don’t let that be the case for you because that hinders your ability to accomplish your goals. Always remember that you have the power to achieve anything you put your mind to. Just go for it!!

Life Unfiltered: Ohio State Edition

How many times do you check your Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook in a day? I check most of these accounts at least five times a day (if not more).

What do you see there? I see picture after picture of high school friends “absolutely loving” their respective colleges or having the “time of their life” in exotic places for vacation. I see friends at Ohio State tweeting about their amazing sorority sisters, or sharing great experiences and opportunities afforded to them.

Do you know what I don’t see? Struggles–the tough days, the inescapable stress, homesickness, the feeling of not belonging or not having true friends. Why do we only go to social media with the good stuff? We paint an unrealistic picture of our lives and we only see the unrealistic picture of others’ lives. No one’s life is as perfect as they make it appear on social media.

How I Actually Felt: My grandfather had just passed away the weekend before and I was still upset. I was wishing that I could be back home in Michigan with my family to go through the grieving process. I wasn't sure if Ohio State was right for me or if I had found any true friends.

Peer Leader Lauren- How I Actually Felt: My grandfather had just passed away the weekend before and I was still upset. I was wishing that I could be back home in Michigan with my family to go through the grieving process. I wasn’t sure if Ohio State was right for me or if I had found any true friends.

In May, an ESPNW article profiled University of Pennsylvania student, Madison Holleran, who committed suicide. The article talked about how her life looked perfect if you viewed her social media accounts; she was a varsity athlete at an Ivy League university with many friends and a supportive family. What it did not show was that she was battling depression and was extremely unhappy. She felt like she was the only one struggling with the transition to college and she did not want to show weakness, so she did not admit how hard of a time she was having.

Peer Leader Julia- Original Caption: All I need in this life of sin is me and my girlfriend <3 How I Actually Felt: Me and my childhood best friend of 13 years are now complete strangers who don't even like each other.

Peer Leader Julia- Original Caption: All I need in this life of sin is me and my girlfriend. How I Actually Felt: Me and my childhood best friend of 13 years are now complete strangers who don’t even like each other.

Her friends were struggling, too. They just tried to hide it through Instagram filters and “everything is great” tweets. They have recently started an initiative to show their bad days as well as the good and share their positive and negative emotions in their captions on social media. They share these pictures and thoughts with the hash tag #LifeUnfiltered.

Peer Leader Julie- How I Actually Felt: What you can't tell is that I'm freaking out over the decision to go to law school - Is it a mistake to not go into Engineering? Can I handle more debt? What if I'm terrible at it? What if I don't get in anywhere? Do people judge me for being a fifth year senior? Doubt and insecurity is underneath that smile.

Peer Leader Julie- How I Actually Felt- What you can’t tell is that I’m freaking out over the decision to go to law school – Is it a mistake to not go into Engineering? Can I handle more debt? What if I’m terrible at it? What if I don’t get in anywhere? Do people judge me for being a fifth year senior? Doubt and insecurity is underneath that smile.

One of my favorite lines from the article is, “It’s OK to not be OK. It’s OK to show people you’re not OK.” This is something I still struggle to accept to this day. This quote comforts me in knowing that I am not the only one who is struggling. If only more people would open up and say, “I am not OK,” we would realize that we are not alone in our struggles.

Peer Leader Inah- How I Actually Felt: Rethinking if Ohio State was right for me, deeply missing my family and my friends from back home, worried that I wasn't fitting in and wasn't finding meaningful relationships, concerned that I wasn't involved in anything, stressed out over passing Chemistry.

Peer Leader Inah- How I Actually Felt- Rethinking if Ohio State was right for me, deeply missing my family and my friends from back home, worried that I wasn’t fitting in and wasn’t finding meaningful relationships, concerned that I wasn’t involved in anything, stressed out over passing Chemistry.

Throughout this blog my fellow Peer Leaders and I have shared with you examples of things we have posted with the original captions and then we rewrote the captions to show how we were actually feeling or struggles that we were facing at that point in time. It is our own take on #LifeUnfiltered. I hope you all know that you are not alone in how you are feeling and that you may consider also participating in this initiative, posting your own photos using the hash tag #LifeUnfiltered.

Peer Leader Sarah- How I Actually Felt: Super nervous and wondering if deciding to move over 2,000 miles away from the place I had always called home was a mistake. I was questioning whether I would ever fit in at a place where I knew no one else.

Peer Leader Sarah- How I Actually Felt: Super nervous and wondering if deciding to move over 2,000 miles away from the place I had always called home was a mistake. I was questioning whether I would ever fit in at a place where I knew no one else.

If you are struggling with mental illness, please do not hesitate to get help and support from the university. Learn more about Counseling and Consultation Service through their website.

5 Ways to Meet New People on Campus

Welcome Week was fun and busy with hundreds of events all over campus, making it easy to meet new people through opportunities that were already planned for you–all you had to do was show up! Still, some new students do not make great connections during Welcome Week, and if you’re one of those students, you’re not alone…and you don’t have to worry. Here are five great ways to meet new people (now that Welcome Week is over):

Leave your door open in your residence hall (when you’re inside your room)

If you are living in a residence hall, you’ve learned by now that you are surrounded by many other students living on your floor, many of whom are new just like you. If you are just hanging out in your room, leave your door open. As people walk by, invite them to join you. Who knows, your new best friend could be living down the hall!

Introduce yourself to someone in class

If you get to class a few minutes early, introduce yourself to the person next to you. Maybe you will make a new friend, or–at the very least–a new study buddy. The First Year Success Series is also a great place to introduce yourself. Everyone in attendance at your session will be a first-year student, too, and since you all selected the same session, you already have something in common! Ask a student why they choose the particular session–it could be a great conversation starter!

Ask someone new to get lunch

Everybody has to eat, so next time you are heading out for a meal, ask someone new to join you. Maybe this is someone in your residence hall, or someone in class. Maybe you choose to venture out and try a new dining location.

Attend a fitness class at the RPAC

Group fitness classes at the RPAC are a fun way to get exercise. There are a bunch of different types of classes, and you can find one you are interested in through the Recreational Sports website. Just like class, get there a couple minutes early to introduce yourself to someone new.

Check out a student organization

There over 1,200 student organizations on campus. Find one you are interested in and plan to attend a meeting. Many student organization accept new members any time throughout the year. This is a great way to find people with similar interest as you.

Still not feeling connected? Reach out to me or to any Peer Leader in First Year Experience–we want to help you find your fit at Ohio State!

Six Snacking Tips for the Hungry College Student

It is certainly that time of the semester where my planner is chock-full of assignments, exams, and student organization meetings. In the midst of a busy semester, it is easy to take short cuts when it comes to your health and nutritional needs. If you are anything like me, I am constantly hungry. Three o’clock rolls around and I am ready for a boost of energy to get me through the day. Here are some tips and tools to arm you with the knowledge you need when hunger strikes.

Morgan blog

Be Proactive

My best piece of advice would be to be proactive. It is easy to grab unhealthy snacks such as chips, cookies, and other processed foods because they are convenient and prepackaged. However, there are alternatives that are more health conscious and will keep you fuller.

When I lived on campus, I would go to one of the campus market locations (Union Market, Curl Market, and Marketplace) and stock my Microfridge with containers of fresh cut berries, yogurt parfaits, and small salads. When a craving would strike, I would already be prepared with healthy options in my own room.

Watch Your Portion Size

Always remember, a snack is NOT a meal. A snack should be something to keep you focused throughout the day–not a meal replacement.

Keep portions small and pay attention to serving sizes. Check out the nutrition label on the back and estimate what a serving would be. It is so easy to mindlessly eat and all of the sudden the whole bag is gone. Oops!

Pack with Care

You might be on-the-go like me or a commuter student who brings your lunch and snacks to school. It is important to pack your snacks safely to avoid food spoilage.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, perishable items such as cheese, meats, and yogurts should not be left out for more than two hours. Make sure you pack snacks with a cold pack and in an insulated container to ensure safe snacking on the go.

Stay Hydrated

Staying hydrated is so important, especially since we’re hiking around campus all day. It is a great idea to carry a water bottle in your backpack–there are many convenient water bottle filling stations all around campus and in residence halls.

Stick to water instead of surgery sweetened beverages. If you crave fizz, try flavored sparkling water.

Look Out for Sugar Bombs

You might be surprised to learn that your favorite granola and protein bars might have as much sugar as a candy bar. The food industry is really sneaky at adding extra sugar to foods and advertising them as “healthy.”

A great alternative would be to snack on fresh fruit with natural sugar and nut butters to give you the boost you need. For example, apples and peanut butter is a delicious snack.

When in Doubt, Consult an Expert

If you are unsure of your specific caloric needs or need help navigating campus dining, it is always best to consult an expert. A Registered Dietitian (RD) is a nutrition expert that can help you with your specific dietary needs.

Fortunately at Ohio State, there are many resources here to help you. Check out the Student Wellness Center located inside the RPAC for nutrition coaching.

From one food lover to another, happy snacking!

Food For Thought

Campus dining plans at Ohio State seemingly change every year, and this year is no exception. Though the new plan may be confusing to novice users, I am going to go through each component of our current plan and share with you what I think are the best possible ways to use it!

Weekly Traditional Visits

Ohio State has three “traditions” dining facilities on campus. On South Campus you have Kennedy Commons, on North Campus you have the brand new Scott Commons, and one on West Campus is Morrill Commons. These are buffet-style facilities where you can eat as much as you want for as long as you want!

You cannot take food out of these places. You must eat inside the building. This is where you can use your Traditional Visits that you are allotted each week! Your Traditions Visits reset every Sunday night at midnight.

Your Traditional Visits can also be used at the market places on campus! We have three market places: MarketPlace (South), Union Market (South), and Curl Market (North). At these market places you can trade a traditional visit for a “market meal exchange”, which gives you your choice of select sandwiches, salads, sides, and a fountain drink…a great option if you are looking for a quick grab-and-go meal. This will save you from having to do a “$5 Exchange”, which is not cost effective at any dining location with the word “Market” in its name.

$5 Exchange

Different meal plans are comprised of different amounts of Weekly Traditional Visits (5 to unlimited). If you find that you are not using them all in a particular week (before they reset), you have the ability to exchange one for a $5 purchase at any non-traditional dining location (like Mirror Lake Creamery).

Dining Dollars

Personally, I think Dining Dollars are super cool and I wish we had them when I still had a meal plan. Dining Dollars can be used at basically all of the dining facilities on campus. Places like Sloopy’s, Oxley’s, 12th Ave. Bread Company, accept Dining Dollars as a cost efficient way to pay for your food (you’ll receive a 10 percent discount for all food purchases made with Dining Dollars). The coolest part of Dining Dollars is that they stay on your BuckID card FOREVER…well, at least until you graduate. They keep rolling over! Unlike BuckID cash, however, Dining Dollars cannot be added. If you use all of them during the semester, you cannot get more until the next semester you have a meal plan.

BuckID Cash

BuckID cash is cash that is on your BuckID that you can use at off campus locations. You can use it like a gift card, but you can always add more money on to it. Most off campus locations accept BuckID cash like Chipotle, Buffalo Wild Wings, and even the Kroger on High Street! Some clothing stores accept it also like Pitaya! (Ladies, go to Pitaya. It is great!)

Suggestions for maximizing your dining plan

Find the deals

In my first year on campus, Kennedy Commons would have chicken finger Fridays, and my friends and I–without fail–went to every chicken finger Friday. The Traditions facilities have great food! Take advantage of it!

Try every Campus Dining location

I lived on South campus and never ate anywhere on North. The first time I ever went to Oxley’s was my sophomore year and found out how amazing it was! I no longer had a meal plan so I was never able to eat there again unless I paid for it myself.

Appreciate your meal plan!

Speaking as a senior who has had to buy her own groceries and make her own food, I can personally tell you that meal plans are the best. There is such a wide variety of food on campus and you can truly find healthy options–take advantage of all of it!

5 Ways to Prepare for the Career and Internship Fair

If you haven’t seen it advertised around campus, let me be the first to tell you that the Career and Internship Fair is happening, September 15 and 16 in the Ohio Union, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.! I can guess what some of you might be thinking:

“Summer just ended, I’ve been a college student for less than a month, and now you want me to start thinking about jobs and internships?!”

The answer is YES!


It doesn’t have to be intimidating, and it’s fine if you only have experience from high school. Ohio State has a lot of opportunities to prepare you for the world of career and internship fairs.

1. Update* Your Résumé

*Or make one if you don’t have a résumé! Your résumé is the time to showcase your accomplishments and skills you will be bringing to the job. If you don’t know where to start, then Ohio State can help. The Writing Center and Career Counseling and Support Services have resources available online.


Once you have updated it, don’t forget one of the most important steps: PRINT IT. It can be on normal printer paper, or if you want to be more professional you can use résumé paper. It’s less flimsy than normal copier paper and you can find some on the second floor of the Ohio Union in the Resource Room. Once you print out copies of your résumé, be sure to put them in something; don’t just let them hang around unprotected! That way, when you hand a potential employer your résumé, it’s presentable. A padfolio or even a clean, unmarked folder will work. This way you have somewhere to put pen and paper, in case you need to take notes, as well!

2. Prepare What You’re Going to Say

At some point during the fair you will be talking to professionals and you will want to make a good impression. This is where an “elevator speech” comes in. Basically it is a brief speech…imagine a short 20-30 second elevator ride conversation that lets the other person know more about you, your qualifications, and why you’re talking to them about their company. You can see a template here.


Also, think about what you want to ask the professionals at the career fair. What do you want to know about their company, and what they could offer you? If you aren’t sure what you would say, look through this list from Buckeye Careers, Career Counseling and Support Services can help, and if you’re free next Tuesday, September 8th in the evening try going to the Making the Most Out of a Career Fair Workshop. Look through the list of employers attending and do some research on ones that sound interesting to you. That way, you can ask specific–as opposed to general–questions.

3. Pick Out Your Outfit

You are going to want to look professional. Here are a couple suggestions from Buckeye Careers. When in doubt, have someone look over your outfit. Don’t wait until the last minute to do this!


And let’s all remember that you’re not fully dressed without a smile! Let’s be honest: who wants to work with someone who looks like they hate life? Even just looking interested can help your first impression.

4. Breathe

This career fair isn’t going to determine the rest of your life. Think of it as a way to get comfortable in a professional environment. You are going to want an internship or job eventually and being familiar with the process makes a difference.


Just breathe and remember that everyone had to start somewhere.

5. Follow up

Did you connect with an employer at the job fair? Write the representative you spoke with a thank you note! Buckeye Careers has some follow-up suggestions here.


If going to the career fair made you confused about what you want to do with your degree or how to get from point A to point B, don’t worry, there are people to help with that! Buckeye OnPace is an online module that helps you figure out what careers fit with your interests, you can meet with Career Counseling and Support Services, or can talk to your advisor about the resources available in your major. Don’t be afraid to ask questions!