Reflections of A First Year Out-Of-State Student

Where are you from?

Long Island, New York

What is your major?

Speech and Hearing Science

Why did you choose to come to Ohio State?

I chose to come Kiley Nolan Pictureto Ohio State because after looking at 19 schools, I knew I wanted to go to a large university where everyone was able to be themselves. I really loved the athletic atmosphere and traditions. I felt like I was very welcomed here.

What has been the best part about coming to Ohio State?

The best part about coming to Ohio State has been getting to learn so many different things from so many different people, faculty and experiences. I have learned so much outside of my realm of knowledge, my major, my prior experiences and places I have been.

What’s been your funniest moment as an out-of-state student?

The first week of school we were trying to order a pizza and I kept asking if we were going to order a pie. My friends looked at me and kept telling me they were ordering a “large.” I kept asking if we were getting a “pie,” and then someone said, “We’re not going to a bakery Kiley, we’re getting pizza!” At that moment I realized they don’t call “large pizzas” a “pie” here. I still to this day do not understand why these crazy Ohioans don’t call it a pie. All I know is I’m not in New York anymore!

Kiley Nolan Picture 2

What has been the most surprising part about coming to Ohio State?

The most surprising part about coming to Ohio State has definitely been that you are MUCH more than just a number. Coming to a large school, I was kind of excited to be just a number because I came from such a small high school. However, now that I am here I realize that I am WAY more than just a number. I can walk anywhere on campus and know at least one person.

What’s the best piece of advice you were given coming into college?

I was given two really good pieces of advice:

1. Make every day an adventure

2. Sleep is for when you are dead.

Both of those have held true this past year!

What are you most looking forward to for the rest of your college experience?

So much! I’m excited to have the opportunity to leave my mark on the university. I have seen how the people above me have accomplished so much in the Ohio State community and I would love to be able to do the same by the time I graduate.

If you could give one piece of advice to other out-of-state students what would it be?

I would tell them to say “YES!” Say yes to things people who live in Ohio tell you to do, to taking a random class, to having lunch with a family member, to going to a new state. Just say “Yes!”

Kiley Nolan 3

 

5 ways Ohio State is changing this fall

Ohio State will look and feel a bit different when you return to campus in August.

Classes start on Tuesday

For years, the first day of autumn classes has always been Wednesday, but the autumn 2015 semester will begin on Tuesday, August 25 in order to accommodate a new calendar that now includes an autumn break (see below). Many Welcome Week events–like the Student Involvement Fair and the President’s Convocation–will still occur in the days before classes begin, but you will likely see other Welcome Week events moved to different days to accommodate the earlier start date. Check the Welcome Week website later this summer for an up-to-date listing of 2015 events and opportunities.

Autumn break

Students and faculty will have two days off from classes–October 15-16–giving many the opportunity for a long weekend in the middle of the semester. In addition to starting classes one day earlier, the term will also extend one day later in order to accommodate this mid-semester break. Classes will end on Wednesday, December 7 and final exams will begin on Friday, December 9. The university’s academic calendar includes future autumn break dates through autumn 2019.

North residential district transformation

Four new residence halls on North Campus–Scott House, Torres House, Bowen House, and Raney House–are expected to open this fall, accommodating nearly 1,800 additional students living on campus. Two new dining facilities will serve students on North Campus: Traditions at Scott and Curl Market. Additional facilities are expected to open by autumn 2016 in order to accommodate both first- and second-year students with the university’s new 2-year on-campus living requirement. Follow the progress and get updates at the what’s growing on? website.

Dining plans

Beginning this summer, new plans offered through University Dining Services allow students to choose the option that best fits their lifestyle, eating habits and personal needs. Most plans include a combination of weekly traditional visits, $5 exchange (which allows students to exchange a traditional visit for a $5 purchase at any non-traditional dining location, or for a “Market Meal Exchange” at Ohio Union Market, Marketplace and Curl Market), Dining Dollars (similar to BuckID cash, but used only in dining facilities at a 10% discount; rolls over until graduation), and Buck ID cash.

Bike sharing

Ohio State is partnering with Zagster to bring a bike-sharing system to the Columbus campus, enabling students to navigate campus and surrounding neighborhoods via a one hour checkout on weekdays and three hours on weekends. This initiative fulfills a request by Undergraduate Student Government to have a bike-sharing program in place by fall. Zagster currently operates programs at Yale University, Princeton University, Santa Clara University and California State University, East Bay.

We are excited about these great changes taking place, and we hope you are, too–it’s a great time to be a Buckeye!

Columbus: The place to be in the summer

We are so close to summer I can almost taste the Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams and hear the crack of a bat at a Columbus Clippers game. Whether you find yourself in Columbus for the summer or just here for the end of the school year, there are countless opportunities to quench your boredom and explore the city. Here are some of my favorites:

The Short North:

For those of you who have not visited the Short North on High Street south of campus, I implore you to pull out your BuckID, hop on a COTA bus, and get on down there. Some of my favorite memories at Ohio State have been on the first Saturday of every month when all the art galleries and stores in the area open up their doors for Gallery Hop.

A store called Flower Child is my personal favorite in the Short North. Often described as an up-scale thrift shop, Flower Child has an outfit for any occasion and it has the best vintage selection around. Paired with a scoop of Columbus’s very own Jeni’s ice cream, your Saturday night just got a whole lot cooler.

Free Concerts:

The best part about staying in Columbus over the summer is the weekly concert on the Columbus Commons, which puts a local band on the big stage. Food trucks, including Mikey’s Late Night Slice, and Jeni’s all show up for the concert each Wednesday from 7-11 p.m. Frisbees, blankets, and a date are encouraged.

There are also free fitness classes offered at the Columbus Commons!

Easton:

Easton is the shopping mall where boredom goes to die. There are stores for every kind of shopper, from Nordstrom to See’s Candy and Jeni’s Ice Cream (it’s everywhere…). There are plenty of restaurants around and a movie theater.

Food:

I love to eat, and Columbus is known as the test market of the United States. If you love food as much of me, you will try Dirty Frank’s Hot Dog Palace downtown and Hot Chicken Takeover in the North Market, which are two of the city’s pride and joys. Or if you are looking for a more upscale restaurant, be sure to check out one of Cameron Mitchell’s restaurants.

Zoo:

I have always loved sea turtles, and to get my fill I have always gone to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, which was ranked the best zoo in the nation in 2009. Although this will require a car, the zoo is definitely worth the trip. With 10,000 animals all in one place you are sure to see your favorite and discover new animals. Like this one:

The Franklin Park Conservatory is also a great place to get your butterfly fix!

 

From the Blue Jackets to German Village there is always something new in the 614. Don’t like any of my ideas? Find your own hidden gems in the area and let me know what I have to try!

Interview with Dean Manderscheid of Arts and Sciences

Questions for Dean Manderscheid

Walking across the Oval, you might not think twice about the tall, scholarly individual walking across campus. You might totally mistake him for a professor walking to class. After all, Dean Manderscheid is a professor of mathematics, having taught for well over 30 years before becoming a Dean in academia. However, today he spends most of his time traveling around the country while also overseeing the largest and most diverse of Ohio State’s colleges, the College of Arts and Sciences. Although a humble and warm person, he holds a position of immense influence for the university — he is  the visionary behind a large section of the university’s academic growth, expansion and future.

What is a college Dean? What does it take to be the Dean of Arts and Sciences, one of the largest colleges in the nation? What is this man’s deal with donuts? After sitting down in his office in University Hall, my questions were answered as I had the opportunity to learn more about the man behind “Donuts with the Dean.” I learned that the Michigan-native came to the university from Nebraska a little over a year and a half ago and that he perfectly fits in the Arts and Sciences, due to his own wide realm of interests, from the social sciences to mathematics.

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It’s now the moment you’ve all been waiting for, it’s time to get to know the donut dean himself, Dean Manderscheid:

Can you tell me a little bit about what brought you to Ohio State? (Your background before becoming the Dean of Arts and Sciences?)

“Well I was Dean at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln College of Arts and Sciences for six years … I was contacted by the search firm for this position, that I’d been nominated Ohio State is always a university that I’ve looked towards at as a leader so I decided to look at this position. Before that I was at the University of Iowa for 20 years, on the faculty, starting as an assistant professor up through department chair, and so my wife and I decided to make the move here.”

How do you like Ohio?

“We love it because my wife is originally from upstate New York and I’m originally from ‘that state up north’ as they say, and so it’s closer to home for both of us.”

How is OSU different than Nebraska?

“Well Ohio State is a much bigger institution. At Nebraska there wasn’t a medical school for example, there wasn’t Vet Med, so it’s just bigger in general. The entire University of Nebraska, when I was there, was 24,000 students and here the College of Arts and Sciences (alone) is over 20,000 students, which gives you a feeling as to the size differential. The University of Nebraska at Lincoln is in a town of 300,000 and here you’re in a town of 2 million. So there’s lots of differences.”

Can you tell me about Donuts with the Dean? Was it your idea? 

“I’ve always loved donuts. And so I had a tradition in Nebraska where I often brought donuts into the dean’s office, and I mentioned this to our communications staff and they said, ‘well maybe we can do something around students with that’ and so we put our heads together and came up with ‘Donuts with the Dean.'”

“Students are very fond of it, it’s become the type of thing where I will show up at Donuts with the Dean and there are already 50 students waiting to get donuts and we tweet out the location just the day of, so it’s incredible.”

What is your favorite donut?

“A buckeye donut of course (laughing). But we tend to use glazed, because everyone seems to like Buckeye Glazed.”

Can you tell me about the event “Win the Dean’s Money” that took place right before Spring Break?

“That’s something that I started at Nebraska but I just carried over completely, the only change was we asked students to write essays at Nebraska, here they just have to do a tweet and follow me on twitter and have to hashtag ‘Win the Dean’s Money’ or something like that.”

Why did you choose to engage with students on both of these forums? 

“Social media fascinates me, because I see that’s where the future’s headed and it changes so quickly. And so, for example, when Twitter first came out people said, well you can’t say anything in 140 characters, and I thought “wow, what can you say in 140 characters” and I really got into it very early on. And blogging I started early also, just because I love the idea of sharing what I love and sharing things about the university I love.”

What do you think is the most important role of a Dean?

“A Dean sets a vision for a college, and where is the college headed. For example, what are the new majors that will be attractive to students. For example we started a neuroscience major recently and now over 800 students are enrolled, we started a data analytics major that just started this year and I predict we will have hundreds of students very soon … so setting a vision and setting a program that students will find attractive.”

Are there any potential new majors in the making for the future?

“One that I can talk about is coming fall of ’16 is Moving Image Production. Years ago we used to have a film major … for an institution of our size and given the importance of video these days, its really something and a mission that I think is obvious. Our students are finding it on their own and finding it at Ohio State, but we have to make it easier for them; we have alumni very well placed in the entertainment industry, we have contacts in the entertainment industry — we should use that. They’re happy to help our students, once again this is a major for those with artistic talent, where it can pay off very well.”

You have a background in mathematics, where did that stem from?

“I’ve always been good with numbers. I was always the kid in school who was first to memorize his multiplication tables and things like that and I’ve always been fascinated with numbers. When I went to college I was a math major but I thought I’d go to law school but I was just having too much fun with math so I decided to become a math professor … I became a professor — oh gosh — 30-some years ago.”

What is a misconception that students might have about a Dean?

“Well I’m not sure they even know what a Dean does … I think students aren’t sure who a Dean is, they think of a Dean as maybe the principal, but it’s a different role.”

How is the college of Arts and Sciences different from other colleges?

“The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest college on campus. We teach over 60 percent of the credit hours at the university because we teach the bulk of general education courses, so every student on campus will take a course in the College of Arts and Sciences. We’re the college where they get their math, where they get their English, where they get there chemistry … basic subjects that are common to so many different majors.”

What is a typical day like for you?

“Well, lots of meetings, a day full with meetings. It starts pretty early, I tend to get to the office at 7:30 or 8. Sometimes I’ll have events in the evening and sometimes not. A dean’s day is pretty long, emails into the evening, but mostly meetings with faculty, with students, other administrators trying to set the agenda for the university.”

When you do meet with students, what types of issues do you normally meet about?

“I like to know whats on their minds. For example, I have a student advisory board (with about 16 students) and one of the things I asked them recently was, ‘well, we changed advising in the college, do you think it’s working? What are the things that we can improve? Or do you think we should have more students who are international? Or do we have the right number?’ Those types of questions. Really, I think student input is very important.”

Do you have any comments about the faculty you interact with at Ohio State?

“We have a very world-renowned faculty here at Ohio State but one of the things that distinguishes the faculty is that they could work many other places, some who have come to Ohio State because they felt Ohio State cared more about teaching, and that’s why they came here. That connection with the students is very strong here; the value we place on being an outstanding research institution, which we are, but also one that teaches and values teaching.”

If you could change one thing about the role of a college Dean, what would it be?

“(More) interacting with students. Fundamentally I went into being a professor to teach. As a Dean it doesn’t make sense for me to teach because of my travel schedule, and I wish I could teach more, and I do teach classes every so often … but interacting with students — it’s what I miss most about being a professor.”

**** Testament to this statement:

Instead of this being a one-way interview, the Dean spent just as much time asking me about my life as a student. We talked for more than an hour about my studies, family, favorite classes and my goals for the future. 

What is your favorite part of your job in general?

“Oh, feeling that I can have a positive impact on education in particular students … I work long hours but I really see the benefit when I hand a student their diploma and see how happy they are … graduation is my favorite time of year.”

 I noticed you said you took a lot of social science course in addition to your mathematics, do you think these interests help you with your role in the diverse College of Arts and Sciences?

“When I was an undergraduate I was in a special program at Michigan State where I could take any courses I wanted as long as my advisors or faculty members signed off on it so I took courses all over the place … and I feel like I’m doing that again now. Because I talked to a chemist one day, I talked to an English professor the next day, I talked to a linguist the next day, and I just have this, it just satisfied my intellectual curiosity which I haven’t lost, in fact it’s gotten stronger, so that’s why I think, in part, I make a good Dean for the College of Arts and Sciences, that intellectual curiosity — I’ve never met a subject I didn’t like.”

Do you have any upcoming events?

“The April ‘Donuts with the Dean’ is coming up.  What I like about the April one is hopefully the weather is warm enough so we can set up outside.”

Do you have any goals for your college in the future?

“(To be the) best College of Arts and Sciences in the country, period. As simple as that. This college used to be five separate colleges that were put together in 2010, so (it’s) the idea is we are one of the largest colleges of arts and sciences in the country and we’re one of the best, now let’s use our size to be the best. So let’s do things to cut across boundaries … Departments on campus are kind of artificial things set up based on what was important hundreds of years ago sometimes, so let’s find out what’s important now and build on what we have to get there. It’s not that the traditional departments are unimportant, its just that there are other things that are important now too.”

Do you have any advice for students regarding their academic career/experience?

“Meet lots of people, take some chances, don’t do anything crazy but take a course, maybe take an anthropology course, you might not even know what anthropology is but you might like it. Take some chances in the courses you take and the people you meet, get outside your comfort zone every so often. Another bit of advice I’d like to give students: get to know your professors. They may look scary but most of them will want to talk to you because they’re passionate about their subject and if they see you’re passionate about it too, they’ll want to talk to you.”

What is your favorite Ohio State tradition?

“‘Carmen, Ohio,’ the singing of ‘Carmen, Ohio.’ You know, I didn’t get it until I first saw it… I knew it was a great tradition and it took me a while to see how important it was but now I just think it’s fabulous … I mean very few schools have an alma mater that everybody knows, and sings … I mean, I even know it now. I still remember, it was my first month or two on the job and I was at an Alumni Event in Los Angeles, and just seeing the alumni sing ‘Carmen, Ohio,’ — bam — it’s like they’re back on campus immediately.”

Is there anything you wish the student body knew about you, and if so what would it be?

“I love Ohio State just as much as they do.”

What to Expect When You Move Off Campus

I lived in Smith-Steeb my freshman year, so I had it pretty good. Super nice rooms, full service on-campus food options very close by, and an unlimited number of people to turn to if I needed help or advice. Don’t get me wrong, I love living off campus and I love my house now, but there are definitely times when living in the dorms seemed so much simpler.

When you live in a dorm, you pay a lump sum at the beginning of the semester to cover all of your food and housing fees, and that’s that. When you live off campus, you have to pay bills! It sounds crazy and way too adult-like, but it’s true.

Bills are definitely the worst part of living off campus. Now that you’re responsible every month not only for rent, but for gas, electric, cable/Internet and water, you need to be way better about managing your money and learning to budget. Here are some apps to help you.

Having to go grocery shopping and cook meals is also a big adjustment when moving off campus. You no longer have access to pre-made food whenever you want it (unless you get a commuter meal plan).

Doing your own grocery shopping seems great — you’re able to buy whatever food you want without your mom there to say no, but it’s really important that you are actually getting everything you need to maintain a healthy diet. Also, it is important to get things you know you can cook, and will actually eat. Here are some easy recipes to get you started.

The last thing I think is really important to consider before you move into your off-campus apartment or house in the fall is your relationship with your roommates. I got lucky. I met my current roommates on Facebook, when we all just needed a place to live, and now they are four of my best friends.

If you are living with people who are already your friends, it is important to work hard to keep that relationship in tact. Whether it’s about whose turn it is to vacuum the living room or who didn’t empty the dishwasher, there will be arguments in your home. It’s not always easy living harmoniously with several different people on different schedules.

But I can promise you, if you put in the effort to keep a happy environment in your house, it will definitely be worth it! A little work goes a long way, so it is important to just remember to pick up after yourself and remember that you don’t have any parents to clean up after you anymore.

Living off campus with four roommates has been the best experience I could have asked for. This article isn’t meant to scare anyone away! Just remember that with moving off campus comes a lot of independence, and you have to be prepared to seize it and make the most of it!

One last tip: buying a house pet is going to seem like the best idea you’ve ever had. Chances are, it’s not. Pets are a HUGE responsibility, so make sure you do all research necessary on the care for an animal, and make sure you talk to your landlord to see if pets are even allowed. Think before you adopt!

So, you’re trying to select an elective…

For many students, choosing elective classes may be an afterthought. However, as I look back on my own student experience, the choices I made for my elective courses led me to take the most interesting, memorable, and useful courses during my time in college. Whether it was learning about global affairs through graphic novels, discussing horror literature, or gaining perspectives on cultures different from my own, I still refer to those classes and the great experiences I had in those electives. I recently asked current students to reflect on their favorite electives they have taken so far. Here are some themes I noticed from our shared experiences which may help you pick the best elective for you!

Educate yourself about important issues unrelated to your major

Ohio State’s motto is “Education for Citizenship” and being an educated citizen is essential for every Buckeye. Electives can provide you the opportunity to learn about important social issues so that you can be more informed about the world around you. Donisha Austin, a second year student, described her experience taking SOCIOL 2367.02–Urban Social Problems. Donisha notes that students should consider this class because it was “intellectually stimulating.” Another elective, SOCIOL 3302–Technology and Global Society, helped second-year student Raphael Melke “think critically in a fun way” through engaging discussions about an important topic. Find those classes that will make you think about new ideas that are completely unrelated to your major so that you can be an informed citizen.

Gain important skills that will help you in life

Your major courses will help you master a particular discipline; however, your elective courses can equip you with other essential skills. Many students choose to take classes such as COMM 2110–Principles of Effective Public Speaking. Justine Moran took this class and said that it was a “great way to learn how to effectively speak in front of a group of people.” Whether you are looking to gain skills regarding public speaking, leadership, or even learning CPR, there are electives which can prepare you to be successful in all aspects of your life.

Learn about history and culture through different lenses

Many of us learn about history and cultures through textbooks in high school. While textbooks are certainly not foreign to college classrooms, many professors look to use unique mediums to teach students about complex topics. Lexi Hites took GERMAN 3252–The Holocaust in German Literature and Film. She enjoyed learning about an important historical event through movies and books. Jessica Gregory took SLAVIC 2230–Vampires, Monstrosity, and Evil: From Slavic Myth to Twilight, and loved learning about a different culture through the lens of films like “Dracula.” Find classes like these where you get the chance to look at important topics in unconventional ways.

Take a class just for fun!

Believe it or not, there are courses which will seem so fun you will look forward to going to class. Third-year student Jenna Murray is taking DANCE 2181–Social Dance this semester because she wants to learn ballroom dance. She enjoys that she gets to earn elective credit while exercising and having fun. For many of you, your class schedule may seem daunting. Taking a class just because you think it will be fun is a great way to get some elective credit, learn about something you love, and enjoy your time in class.

Of course, there are too many great electives to talk about in one post. Comment with some of your favorite electives below and let us know about your most memorable classes!

Behind the Organization: The Student Wellness Center

One of the most easily confused and under-utilized resources on campus is the Student Wellness Center, on the main floor of the RPAC. This center may seem small from the outside, but it houses many offices, countless resources and is supported by over 200 peer volunteers.

I sat down with Blake Marble, one of the assistant directors, and Todd Gibbs, the Wellness Coaching program coordinator, to learn more about what the Student Wellness Center has to offer and why students should access its many resources.

Part I: The Wellness Center

For those who are unfamiliar with the Student Wellness Center, can you explain what exactly this center is and does for students?

Blake: “The Student Wellness Center works to educate students about wellness topics and wellness issues. We focus on education, prevention and raising awareness. We are oftentimes confused with Student Health Services. We don’t provide any clinical, medical care or anything like that; we focus on the education piece.

“One of the main things to know about our office is that we are very student-driven. A lot of our one-on-one services are facilitated by students, so it’s students helping students, and that’s one of the main pieces we focus on here because we want to give our students the opportunity to develop those skills to help each other.”

What are the most common reasons students visit the Student Wellness Center?

Blake: “I think there are three main reasons students come to the Student Wellness Center:

1. One is for the excellent one-on-one services we provide students, the personal one-on-one conversation.

2. (Another reason) is for our workshops and presentations; we give over 150 educational workshops each semester.

3. Lastly, to get involved. We have over 200 students who are trained to volunteer in a variety of different ways at the Wellness Center — in all of our one-on-one services (Scarlet And Grey Financial, Nutrition Coaching, alcohol and other drug one-on-one educational sessions, HIV/STI testing, and Wellness Coaching).”

What kinds of programs do student volunteers help with?

Blake: “Every single one of (these programs) has a peer education component to them. We have students who are trained to facilitate all of those one-on-one conversations with students. Students are also involved in giving those presentations to a variety of groups and organizations across campus.

“All volunteers go through extensive training about other resources outside of the Student Wellness Center, to help refer students to outside resources if needed.”

What are your numbers of students and staff?

Blake: “We have around 10-11 full-time staff members, with program coordinators all specializing in different areas and a tad over 200 student volunteers (some graduate level, majority undergraduate level).”

*Interested students who have a passion for helping others can become trained volunteers at the Wellness Center. Often, students in Fisher who desire to one day become financial advisors get involved in Scarlet And Grey Financial Services, and many Public Health students look to become Wellness Coaches. However, the Wellness Center eagerly accepts students from any background or major! If you have a passion for helping others, consider the incredible opportunity! Interested in getting involved? Get started here!

What resources does the Student Wellness Center offer that more students should utilize?

Blake: “Every single one of them. There’s so many here, and I’ll say the one thing that I tell students in every workshop and conversation that I have with them: ‘You’re at a point in your life as an Ohio State student that you have more resources available to you free of charge than you probably will again in your life, and odds are you can walk to just about all of them within about 10 minutes. So no matter what it is that you want to work on within your own personal life – there’s someone here to help you, so use those resources.”

“We see thousands of students every year for one-on-one sessions but we always want more students to come.”

Are there any new programs students should know about?

“I would say one of the newest programs that we have that has really taken off over the past year or so is our Wellness Coaching program. But it’s basically a strengths-based approach to wellness. So it’s a one-on-one coaching session where students can come in wellness coaching regarding anything, any types of issues that they’re having, any obstacles they have in their life… (Wellness Coaching) has a strength-based component to it; you take a strengths finder before you come in, and then use those strengths to then meet your goals in life — to really maximize your potential.”

*The Wellness Center partners with all student life programs including CCS, Student Health Services, refer back and forth based on how to best meet the needs of the students coming in.

What are some common challenges students face in their first year? 

Blake: “I immediately think about the transition from high school to college. But with that come many challenges relating to personal wellbeing or personal wellness. Some of the things that I automatically think of are stress and time management, and these things affect your emotional wellness and stuff like that. There are so many changes and decisions your first year that it comes down to prioritizing the things in your life and not letting it overwhelm you at times.

“A lot of it too is finding that social support system around you. I think a lot of students come from high school and are challenged with coming to such a big place and finding that support group within Ohio State and it can be kind of overwhelming at times. So a lot of it is that social-emotional aspect of it and finding where you fit in and understanding that college is a place to explore different things, get involved in different areas, but also being strategic about that.”

What would you say to a student who’s going through some of those transitional issues and is perhaps hesitant about addressing those problems?

Blake: “We all face challenges on a daily basis, it matter of how we approach those challenges and the way that we view things in our lives and put things in perspective. But one of the things I tell students on a daily basis, no matter what it is or what they’re working on or what they’re challenged with, just utilize the resources that are available to you. Whether that’s the Student Health Center, FYE, counseling (CCS), anything on campus, just utilize the resources that are available to you. All of our students and staff are trained in resources outside of our office so if maybe we can’t answer all the questions or maybe we’re not the people that are trained to help you in one specific area but we can connect you to the people and resources that are.”

What would you say is the program area that students access the most?

Blake: “Honestly, the most foot traffic we probably get on a weekly basis is Condom Club. It’s quick, easy, accessible, and one of our resources that student utilize the most.”

“Some people think that’s all we do (laughing). It’s a struggle at times but it gets them through the door and they then learn about all the other things that we do.”

For students who may be apprehensive about asking for help, how can they take that first step?

  • Email
  • Schedule appointment online
  • Connect through peers

Blake: “Research has shown that students feel more comfortable talking to other students about different things that they’re dealing with in their lives and that’s been one of the reasons that we have so many students that go through extensive training on this, but we also do have experts in each of these areas that help reach out to those students if needed.”

“There’s a lot of stigmas associated with wellness issues, and we’re trying to break down those walls on a daily basis and we’re trying to approach things from a different perspective that might help reduce those stigmas a little bit.”

What else would you like first-year students to know?

Blake: “We’re here to help, I just want students to know that. And everything we do is free too, everything is free of charge. You pay for it in your student fees, but nothing that we do cost money, so we want students to really utilize these resources.”

Appointments: After you reach out to make an appointment, most appointments are 45 minutes to an hour long.

Blake: “We usually can see students within a week or so (of their initial call) for their session — so it’s a pretty quick turn around.”

Some services do have some pre-appointment components for students to fill out prior to an appointment:

Part II. Wellness Coaching

Nutrition Coaching, Financial Coaching… but what really is Wellness Coaching?

Wellness Coaching is one of many services available through the Wellness Center. However, Wellness Coaching specifically focuses on the nine different dimensions of wellness using a strengths-based model. 

Todd: “We think that challenges are just part of being human. So if people can identify their strengths and start to use them to move toward the goals they have for their wellness, then lots of good things can happen. That’s what we do.”

Coaching vs. Counseling

Todd: “Our coaches are largely peers rather than medical professionals.”

Counseling: Uses medical model: diagnose the problem then treat it.

Coaching: Uses strengths and positive psychology to look at what’s going right with people, not what’s going wrong

What are the top wellness areas (out of the nine dimensions of wellness) that students seek help through wellness coaching?

Blake: “Two of the top areas that students want to focus on more are social wellness and emotional wellness.”

 Q: Why do students typically face emotional wellness concerns? 

A: Stresses of finding a major or making life decisions.

Todd: “I think that you can feel (stressed, overwhelmed, anxious) if you don’t know that you’re capable of navigating through those transitions. It can pose a real threat.”

“I think that’s what’s at the core of the coaching, helping people see that ‘Oh I am someone that can make the decisions for my life and who knows what I really care about and value so I can find my way through that, so now I don’t get quite as stressed or as anxious when I run into those things in the future.’”

Attempting to be well in all nine dimensions can be overwhelming:

Todd: “When you improve your wellness in any area, it improves your wellness overall … If it matters to you and you invest in your wellness in that area, it is going to have nothing but benefits for you in that area, whether it’s something you are already strong in, or an area where you think you need more improvement.”

More information:

Student Wellness Center Hours:

Monday-Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

A Southern Buck-I-SERV Spring Break

twin falls

Your first spring break in college… we’ve all been there at one point or another. Was it as fun as you expected? Did you meet any new people? Is reality hitting you hard in the face because of how awesome it was?

If you would have asked me what I was doing for spring break in December, I probably would have said something along the lines of “I’m going to the Bahamas with my friends,” however, I did something else and it was an AMAZING experience. First year or not, listen up when I say that Buck-I-SERV at Ohio State is such a rewarding organization and I encourage everyone to participate in at least one before you graduate.

Wondering why?

I was asked to be a trip leader for a trip to Mullens, West Virginia, during spring break. When first asked I was kind of skeptical; I mean, why Mullens? Of course I learned more information about the destination.

Mullens is a town in southern West Virginia that is experiencing many hardships at the moment. You see, Mullens used to be a town where things happened. Downtown was booming and there were many residents. In recent years, residents  are finding a lack of jobs, which leads to the younger generations leaving the town.

Mullens is a great little town, it reminds me of my own little hometown. Everyone knows one another and everyone is SO FRIENDLY. It was so nice to get away from the hustle and bustle of schoolwork and the city for a while. I didn’t know how much I was missing nature (or the woods) until I stayed in Twin Falls State Park. The scenery, the hills, the trees, the waterfalls — everything about it was gorgeous.

There were six of us, including our advisor. It was a tiny group, but we had SO MUCH FUN. We were able to volunteer at the Mullens Opportunity Center (otherwise known as the MOC). They actually had a pretty horrible flood the week before we got there, so a lot of our work was to help with the outdoor cleanup.

We worked with students from the University of Baltimore (they were awesome, by the way) the entire week. We shoveled up the fallen dirt to rebuild the hillside by a river behind the MOC, we filled in holes in the concrete with gravel, but our biggest project was the High Tunnel.

You see, the MOC is an awesome place. This opportunity center holds workshops for the residents of Mullens that can help them in nearly all aspects of life. They have a workout room, a lawyer’s office, line dancing, a computer lab where individuals can earn their GED and SO many other programs. They also have fitness programs going on, where individuals can keep track of how many laps they took around the gym and the activity they’re involved in. If that wasn’t awesome enough, they hand out prizes to the person who completed the most that week. LIKE COME ON THAT’S CRAZY COOL.

One of the MOC’s coolest projects, in my opinion, is their Farm to School campaign. Basically, this campaign is to try and get local farmers to grow fruits and vegetables for the schools in the county. Eventually, they would like each school to have their own High Tunnel to grow produce for the community. (A high tunnel is a fancy word for a greenhouse, in case you’re wandering, as I was.) We worked on constructing this and getting top soil and compost for the beds. By the time we were leaving they were working on the roof.

Hands down, this trip was such a blast. The workers at the MOC were so thankful we had decided to come and showed us so much love. It was an amazing experience.

One of the last nights we were there, we had a campfire with the University of Baltimore where a local orator told us stories about the town’s history and scary stories. We roasted marshmallows and listened to a delightful woman sing. It is so nice knowing that we helped make a difference.

I love the little town of Mullens, and I want them to thrive. I am so thankful that I had the opportunity to spend the week with some new friends, make some memories, and help make a difference. If you ever have the chance to go on a Buck-I-SERV trip, GO. I promise you will love it.

The Denman Undergraduate Research Forum: What It Is and Why You Should Participate

For those of you who don’t know, Ohio State is a research university! This means your professors, in addition to giving lectures, conduct research in their respective fields. More than 20 years ago, an Ohio State alumnus named Richard Denman wanted to shed more light on the undergraduate students who were conducting research alongside these professors, and give them an opportunity to present their work.

Thus, the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum was born! Here’s what you should know about the forum as a first-year student:

1. What is it?

The Denman is an event held over the course of a single day in the RPAC, where more than 500 students present posters summarizing their research projects and their results. Each project is judged by at least three people (faculty, graduate students, or corporate judges). Multiple winners are selected from different fields of study, receiving cash prizes. About 80 percent of students who apply to present are accepted.

 2. How much time would I need to dedicate to the process?

Students will spend anywhere from 10-15 hours a week on their research, whether it be during fall or spring semester, or over the summer. Students spend at least one semester, if not an entire year, completing their work. Dr. Allison Snow, director of the Undergraduate Research Office, recommends tailoring a semester schedule to suit your expected research schedule.

3. So I can get a cash prize… what else?

Winning an award at the Denman is much more than receiving a cash prize. This becomes a valuable part of your resume, and can lead to future research down the road, even after graduation. Presenting in and of itself is impressive, though, whether you win an award or not. It shows future employers or graduate schools that you are serious and passionate about your field!

4. How do I get started?

The best place to start is the Undergraduate Research Office website. There you can find out about their information sessions and workshops, contact a peer researcher in your field, sign up to receive emails about funding opportunities, and find their advising hours. You should also start reaching out to graduate students and professors about research opportunities they may have. Most students begin by volunteering in other research projects before starting their own.

5. This is the first time I have heard about the Denman, am I behind??

No, not at all! In fact, Dr. Snow advises that a student’s first year is the time to learn, observe, and talk to others who have already conducted research. Go to the forum (Wednesday, March 25 from 12 p.m.-3 p.m.) and ask presenters about their experiences! If you find after some investigation that you are interested in participating, your second or third year is the time to contact faculty, and start to form an idea of what kind of research you want to conduct. By senior year (at the latest), you should be ready to present your work!

Participating in research and the Denman is extremely rewarding, but it’s not for everyone. THAT’S OK. If it is for you, don’t let it overwhelm you! Take it step-by-step, use the Undergraduate Research Office as your guide, and before you know it, you’ll be presenting!

The Sweet 16: Facts about March Madness schools

The NCAA men’s basketball tournament season is upon us and my FYE colleague, Julie Richardson, and I are ready to get caught up in the madness that is college hoops; we also love the history, traditions, and fun facts that relate to American colleges and universities. Here, we share what we think are interesting tidbits for 16 schools participating in this year’s tournament.

(1) Villanova University (Villanova, PA)

Villanova boasts the largest student-run Special Olympics event in the world and is the official host of the Special Olympics Pennsylvania fall state games.

(2) Gonzaga University (Spokane, WA)

Gonzaga’s Crosby Student Center is named for crooner Bing Crosby who sang the holiday favorite, “White Christmas.” Crosby attended Gonzaga beginning in 1920 but left before graduating to pursue his singing career.

(3) Baylor University (Waco, TX)

For more than 60 years, Baylor University students have celebrated Dr. Pepper Hour with free Dr. Pepper every Tuesday afternoon from 3 to 4 p.m.

(4) Georgetown University (Washington, DC)

Established in 1789, Georgetown is the nation’s oldest Catholic and Jesuit university.

(5) University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA)

The mascots for Northern Iowa are TC (The Cat) Panther and TK (The Kitten) Panther.

(6) Butler University (Indianapolis, IN)

Bestselling author Kurt Vonnegut dropped out of Butler University in 1942 after failing to earn no higher than a C in his English classes.

(7) Wichita State University (Wichita, KS)

The Shocker bowling team has captured 19 national championships and attracts student bowlers from all over the world.

(8) San Diego State University (San Diego, CA)

President John F. Kennedy gave the commencement address at San Diego State in 1963 (just months before he was assassinated). The President received the university’s first honorary doctorate–also the first in the California State University system.

(9) Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN)

Amelia Earhart was a faculty member at Purdue from 1935 until her disappearance in July 1937. She served in the Department for the Study of Careers for Women and in the Department of Aeronautics.

(10) Davidson College (Davidson, NC)

Over Family Weekend during presidential election years, the Young Democrats and College Republicans debate about relevant issues across balconies of two campus buildings named for the first two student societies founded at the college, the Eumenean Society and the Philanthropic Society.

(11) The University of Texas (Austin, TX)

The University of Texas at Austin reports 4.7 million on-campus dining transaction per year, which includes serving 496,572 locally-made tortilla.

(12) Wofford College (Spartanburg, SC)

According to Sports Illustrated, Wofford (6) outranked Ohio State (7) in 2007 for best uniforms in college football.

(13) Harvard University (Cambridge, MA)

John Harvard’s statue famously presides over Harvard Yard–except it isn’t actually John Harvard. A stand-in, namely Sherman Hoar, sat in as the model.

(14) University at Albany, State University of New York (Albany, NY)

Albany has 1,248 columns on its Uptown Campus, one of three architecturally distinct campuses that comprise the university.

(15) Belmont University (Nashville, TN)

Belmont is home to the Mike Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business, which offers four areas of study in Music Business, Audio Engineering Technology, Entertainment Industry Studies, and Songwriting.

(16) Coastal Carolina University (Conway, SC)

In 2014 Costal Carolina University was one of three college campuses in the country selected to receive a mobile Starbucks Coffee truck.

 

Good luck to all teams participating in this year’s men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, and especially to our 5-seed Buckeye women’s team and our 10-seed Buckeye men’s team!