Scarlet Scramble is Back

TBT to Scar Scram 2014

Did you know University Hall is the real building used as Hollis College in Pretty Little Liars? Or that the first Wendy’s restaurant ever opened was in Columbus? Do you think you can eat a stack of Sloopy’s pancakes faster than anyone else? Then boy do I have an event for you — Scarlet Scramble 2015 is here!

So what is Scarlet Scramble?

It’s a 24-hour campus and city adventure that includes challenges, trivia questions, and clues to decode. Teams compete from 6 p.m. on March 27 to 6 p.m. on March 28 to earn points and win prizes (like Amazon and HOMAGE gift cards). The Scramble is brought to you by First Year Experience, and each team should have at least five first year students, but can have up to five other students (non first-years) too.

You know you want a new HOMAGE shirt.

You know you want a new HOMAGE shirt.

I participated in my first Scarlet Scramble my freshman year and have helped plan it the last two years. It is one of my favorite events on campus because not only do you get a sweet T-shirt just for signing up, you also get to run around campus with your friends, learn something new while you’re doing it, and compete for prizes! Plus you end up with some pretty cool pictures like these.

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2013

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2013

TBT to Scar Scram 2014

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2014

To learn more about #ScarScram2015, check out the video below!

Registration is open until March 9. To sign up for the best time of your life visit fye.osu.edu/scarletscramble.

See you March 27!

Switching Majors? Don’t Fret

First-years: having qualms about your major? Uncertain about the future? Don’t fret — you’re not alone. Deciding what to major in is challenging. It can feel like one decision determines the trajectory of your life — which is overwhelming, to say the least.

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Choosing a major that’s right for you boils down to one little formula: find something you’re passionate about but is still sensible.

For instance, one of my friends loves civil liberties, women’s studies, and everything in between. Her major, political science, is both practical and applicable, and it’s something she’s overzealous about. There are hundreds of majors at Ohio State, and I can guarantee there is something for you; it just needs to be discovered.

If you’re unsure where to begin, start by talking to an expert. The Younkin Success Center offers career counseling and consultations.

Although it’s a bit cheesy, also consider consulting a career quiz.

It’s OK to not have everything figured out. There are resources and people to help! Switching majors can seem stressful, specifically when changing from department to department.

When I switched from the College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences to the College of Engineering, I was a bit dazed with an entirely new schedule and even different class settings and locations. However, there are counselors for that. If you’re thinking about switching, talk to an advisor. They will help you transition smoothly and alleviate a lot of stress.

Finding the best fit isn’t always cut and dry. Remember to focus on finding something that gets you excited. Whether it be science, psychology, business, or anything in between, an awesome major awaits you.

Don’t Let Rejection Define You

College isn’t supposed to be easy.

You aren’t supposed to get everything you want. Rejection is natural and necessary in college, because it helps you develop a thick skin that is crucial to your success in the rest of your life.

I have been fortunate in so many opportunities in college. I was accepted to the school I’d fallen in love with. When I was a first-year student, I got an amazing job at the Ohio State student newspaper that I was dying to work for. I was able to move up through other positions there, too. When I went through formal recruitment in my second year of college, I got into the sorority that immediately felt like my home. Over the years I’ve had several internships that shaped my career and meant a great deal to me.

But those successes did not come without failures, and I’m a better person for it.

At the end of my third year at Ohio State, the plan was to apply for editor-in-chief of The Lantern, and hopefully claim the job I’d had my eye on for years. I was hopeful, I was prepared, I was convinced I had a shot. And I did have a shot. But I missed. The job went to a better candidate, and I was devastated.

At first, I didn’t want to believe the news. How could I possibly fail? Was I really hearing correctly, had they really chosen someone else? When I calmed down and accepted the news I was given, my boss presented me with a choice: I could quit the job I had because I was bitter about the job I’d never have, or I could go back out in the newsroom with my head held high and work.

With some anger and resentment in my heart, I chose the latter.

Working that day was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do professionally. But eventually, the pain settled and I made the choice not to return to the paper for my final year in college. Instead, I opted to seek out other opportunities and give myself more free time than I’d been able to enjoy during my other years in college, since I was working an average of 40-45 hours a week at The Lantern.

The excruciating rejection I felt that day last spring turned out to be such a blessing.

I took a fellowship over the summer in Phoenix, Arizona, that showed me maybe newspapers weren’t my calling. Had I been named editor-in-chief, I think I would’ve loved it, but with the thought in the back of my mind that my passion might be elsewhere, I think I would’ve been stifling my opportunity to explore other options.

Instead, I returned to campus and accepted a communications and marketing research internship at Battelle, the world’s largest nonprofit research firm. In the past five months at Battelle, I have learned so much about the corporate marketing and communications world that I wouldn’t have otherwise been exposed to — and it’s doing everything to help my future career.

Rejection is hard — it feels like the end of the world. But it’s not. There is nothing wrong with mourning the loss of an opportunity you had your eye on, but the important part is to compartmentalize your pain and not let it ruin your life.

I could’ve spent my senior year bitter over lost opportunity. But instead I chose to seek out a new opportunity, and that has been endlessly rewarding.

If you go through college and don’t face any rejection, I don’t envy you. Rejection builds you into a stronger person who is more open to new experiences and opportunities they would’ve otherwise missed.

Don’t let rejection define you. Keep an open mind, and take advantage of all Ohio State and Columbus have to offer you. You never know what else you’ll find.

Your Résumé (not) To-Do List

We’re at the time of year where many students are polishing (or perhaps creating) their résumés for summer employment opportunities. In FYE, we get to see some great (and not-so-great) résumés from student leaders who support new students, so these tips I’m sharing with you are based on years of observation of what doesn’t work on a student résumé.

Disclaimer: My opinion is just one in a sea of opinions about résumés; it also comes with the caveat that you should heed the recommendations of the Career Services office for your college or department (especially if you are seeking to become gainfully employed in that field or discipline).


Extravagant paper

You never know who you’re offending with pink, speckled paper, and the print on dark colors can be difficult to read if the résumé is photocopied. Stick to white or cream résumé paper.

Graphics or pictures of any kind

Who doesn’t love a good cat pic or NFL logo? There is a time and a place for those things, but it should not include your résumé (plus, you may be violating copyright laws). Be remembered for the content of your package, not its wrapping paper.

Inconsistent formatting

A résumé is not the time to experiment with funky fonts, lightning bolts as bullet points, or zigzag margins. Each element of your résumé should look the same as all other elements; for example:

  • Bullet point margins should line up
  • Dates should be formatted identically throughout (9/14 or September 2014…not both)
  • Use of bolditalic or underlined words should be used consistently (e.g., put every job title in bold, underline all section headers)

More than two pages in length

Some people will tell you a résumé should only be one page; regardless, it should never be more than two pages. If you exceed two pages, you are either being too robust in your work history and details, or you are using 18pt font and 3in margins.

Using acronyms

Ohio State is full of acronyms (RPAC, CABS, RA) that the average non-Buckeye may not understand. If the acronym is common and you’ll use it more than once in the résumé, explain what it stands for in your first reference–e.g., Resident Advisor (RA); then, continue to refer to it by its acronym.

Inadequate description of responsibilities

Employers want to be able to determine employee/environment fit for a position, and they need to quickly ascertain which skills you have that are transferable to the job for which you are applying. Choose dynamic words and phrases to illustrate your accomplishments, and aim for 3-5 bullet points for each job or experience listed on your résumé. If you can’t come up with at least three bullet points, it may not be significant enough to include. Download a list of action verbs from Career Counseling and Support Services.

Overwhelming description of responsibilities

Too much content makes it difficult for an employer to discern relevant components of your experience. Again, you’re aiming for 3-5 bullet points per experience that (concisely) demonstrate transferrable skills.

Falsifying information

Lying is bad. Don’t do it.

Spelling and grammatical errors

Two of my favorites: people who say they worked in costumer service (which I guess is helping clowns get dressed?); and, the unfortunate soul who once said she was a lifeguard for the pubic pool. Proofread your résumé, and then ask a trusted friend to look at it as well.

Using a Microsoft Word template

The convenience is alluring, to be sure, but there is nothing about a Word template (that literally anyone with Word can use) that says you are an original, creative person who is more qualified than any other applicant. Create your own template that best represents your identify and experiences.


Additional tips for success

  • Email address – make it appropriate!
  • Objective statement – not necessary unless you’re posting your résumé on a job website.
  • Section headings (and their order) – education should go first (since you’re currently in college) and others depend on the position for which you’re applying (put the most relevant experience next).
  • Font selection and size – nothing too fancy, and it should be between 10pt and 12pt.
  • Sending electronic copies – save and send as a PDF when possible to avoid formatting issues on the receiving end.
  • Using job descriptions/expectations – save your job descriptions or ask your former supervisor(s) for it, then use it to build your résumé bullet points.
  • Envision your “ideal” résumé – pursue opportunities that get you there.

BuckeyeThon: One Team, One Dream, One Million

This is a special year for BuckeyeThon. This year, BuckeyeThon is trying to raise $1,000,000 For The Kids.

That’s right — 6 zeros.

The dancers are giving it their all to accomplish this incredible goal, with the hope of forever changing the lives of kids fighting cancer.

As a former participant, I am here to answer some questions I know I definitely had before doing the dance marathon. Some commonly asked questions:

What exactly is BuckeyeThon? 

BuckeyeThon is Ohio State’s largest student-run philanthropy, which raises funds year-round for the fight against pediatric cancer. All of the donations go toward supporting the kids who are treated on the Hematology/Oncology/BMT Department at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Some events sponsored by BuckeyeThon include CarnOval, Extra Life, High School Dance Marathon, Miracle Miles 5K and, biggest of all, BuckeyeThon: The Dance Marathon.

On February 6-7th, more than 4,000 Ohio State students will participate in the dance marathon! This is the largest number of participants to date Students are required to raise a minimum of $100 to participate, but they are encouraged to raise more. All efforts are made in order to bring the year’s goal one step closer!

I’ve never done a Dance Marathon (DM) before, what is it? And do I need to know how to dance? 

A dance marathon is basically a 24-hour long event, which is broken up into two, 12-hour shifts. The Scarlet Half happens from Friday night to Saturday morning, and the Gray Half happens from Saturday morning to Saturday night. Participants choose their shift during registration.

You definitely do not need to know how to dance! No one cares what you look like dancing or what kind of crazy, wacky dance moves you have because everyone is their to support the Miracle Kids. Also, a dance marathon is a LOT more than just dancing!

Throughout the event, you will not only dance, but you can do other fun and hands-on activities as well. For example, students can meet the Miracle Kids for whom they are dancing, donate their hair, do yoga and maybe even meet Miss Ohio!

Not only are activities provided, but so is food. Dancers are given two full meals and a snack during the event. So don’t worry about packing a meal, but definitely pack a snack, just in case.

 

Why should I do it? 

If you’re still asking yourself that after I just described all these awesome events, just remember:

Buckeyethon 1

What should I wear?

Everyone is put on a color team, so you basically wear the colors of your team. I would suggest having fun with your outfits because people go all out for this event! And, this might be only time in your life that you can wear a tutu for almost 12 hours.

Dress (comfortably) to impress! I suggest you wear comfortable shoes. You will be required to stand for the whole shift, and thus sensible footwear is a must.

Also: if you own a fanny pack, this is the time to blow the dust off of it and put it to good use! Fanny packs are so handy because they don’t interfere with your ability to dance and have fun and they also can hold important items such as your phone and some money.

What should I bring? 

  • BuckID
  • Phone and Charger: You need that phone to be fully charged so that you can document all the fun you’re having! (Pictures or it didn’t happen, right?)
  • Cash or Credit: So you can wear some of BuckeyeThon’s apparel, and look super fly after the DM
  • Snacks: Cannot emphasize this enough, you’ll need to keep your energy up for 12 hours, it’s good to be prepared
  • Deoderant: I’ll just leave it at that

Any other tips? 

Make sure you get plenty of sleep before your shift! Remember this is a marathon and no one starts a marathon running on a couple hours of sleep.

Meet someone new at the DM. Being in the Union for 12 hours, you’re bound to meet someone new and who knows, maybe by the end of your shift, you could leave with a new friend.

Most importantly, HAVE FUN! The Dance Marathon only happens once every year and what better way to kick off spring semester than by supporting BuckeyeThon and taking a stand against pediatric cancer.

 

Final thoughts…

Last year, I participated in the Dance Marathon and it was definitely the highlight of my freshman year. I remember the opening ceremony where we got to meet all the Miracle Kids, and they were so adorable and looked so happy to be there! I knew at that moment that I was not only doing it for them but I was also doing it to for their families.

I danced and laughed the night away. During the event, I got the chance to meet so many inspirational dancers whose families have been affected by pediatric cancer. Listening to their stories made me realize how important this dance marathon is  to the Ohio State community and I was truly glad to be a part of it all.

It’s Not Too Late to Join a Student Org!

After already completing your first semester at Ohio State, some of you may feel it is too late to get involved on campus.

While some students get involved right away, many students choose to focus on their classwork when they first come to school, and choose not to have outside distractions. With all of the changes and adjustments, your first semester is often more overwhelming than many would assume.

While some dive in with full force, many choose to test the water first!

After the rush of Welcome Week, and the fall and spring involvement fairs, you may fear it is pointless or too late to join an organization partway through the year. However, it is not too late take that jump!

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As a matter of fact, many organizations are still seeking or recruiting members! We’ve talked to a few organization leaders from across campus who can provide a bit more information about some of these available and awesome opportunities.

 

I. American Association of University Women

Name: Cassidy Horency

Status: Currently seeking new members

We are a new organization on campus and this is only our second semester, so we are looking for more people! It’s part of a national organization and members can apply for scholarships and grants through it. We usually have pizza. It’s better late than never to join an organization.

II. Buck-I-Serv

Name: Allie Loughry

Status: Currently seeking new members

First-year students should apply for a summer Buck I Serv trip because it’s a great way to give back to the community, spread the Buckeye spirit and meet new people!

III. DanceSport

Name: Jessica Gregory

Status: Currently seeking new members

It’s a great way to meet new people and meet people with similar interests. Members can benefit from this organization because you learn how to dance tons of different ballroom dances and can take your new skills to places around Columbus like La Fogata, which has salsa dancing nights. We are constantly growing and looking for new members.

IV. Delta Sigma Phi fraternity

Name: Alec Wuorinen

Status: Currently seeking new members

Great way to meet new people (lots!) and learn great things about yourself. With more friendships comes greater diverse connections!

V. Institute of Industrial Engineers

Name: Gunnar Smyth

Status: Currently seeking new members

All Industrial Engineering students should join because we go to both the regional and national conference to meet other IEs, learn about the major, and connect you to job opportunities. Leadership positions are available.

VI. John Glenn Civic Leadership Council

Name: Andy Krupin

Status: Currently seeking new members

We host a wide range of meeting activities! There’s something for everyone. Between current events jeopardy and different service projects, the CLC is a great way to learn about your community and make a difference in it, too. The more people we have, the bigger potential impact we can make.

VII. Muslim Students Association

Name: Yousef Yacoub

Status: Currently seeking new members

If you’re a Muslim or interested in Islam, I definitely recommend coming to our weekly general body meetings on Fridays at 6 p.m. in the Interfaith Room on the 3rd floor of the Union, where we host world-renowned Islamic scholars to learn more about the Islamic faith.

VIII. Ohio Staters, Inc.

Name: Joanie Garcia

Status: Currently seeking and recruiting new members

Ohio Staters, Inc. is the oldest student service organization on campus that promotes the welfare and traditions of the university. This org. helps connect students with the deep roots of the university and network with faculty while creating a close community of thinkers, believers, and doers.

IX. Phi Alpha Delta

Name: Leila Khamees

Status: Currently seeking new members

It’s specifically for people interested in law (it’s a pre-law fraternity). We learn if law school is for us, how to apply, what to expect on the LSAT and in law school. Also, we all become super close and have tons in common!

X. Phi Delta Epsilon: Pre-med fraternity

Name: Jenna Murray

Status: Currently recruiting new members (in the fall)

Phi Delta Epsilon is always looking for new members who want community and support through the pre-med process. Meet people who have taken similar classes, form study groups, and be friends!

XI. Psychology Student Ambassadors

Name: Myra Saeed

Status: Currently recruiting new members (for fall)

They should apply to Psych Ambassadors early this semester if they’re psych majors because we do a lot of working with incoming freshmen and program a lot of social and educational events. Also, we’re super tight with the department and that’s awesome!

XII. UNICEF-OSU (United Nations Children’s Fund)

Name: Caroline Tritt

Status: Currently seeking new members

This is a fantastic organization if you’re interested in children’s rights. We educate, advocate, and fundraise on behalf of the U.S. fund for UNICEF to help children in over 190 countries receive an education, get clean drinking water and nutritious foods, immunizations, help with HIV/AIDS, and provide relief in emergency situations. UNICEF is the most efficient humanitarian organization in the world and all the money we raise is doubled through an outside fund! We also talk about current issues affecting children!

 

Just remember:

It’s not too late to find your niche on campus. It’s sometimes less intimidating to join an organization in the winter because fewer events are going on than in the fall! You’ll be able to hit the ground running after summer break!” ~Stephanie Demos

 

Beat the Cold: 5 Things to Do in Columbus’ Great Indoors

No matter how long you’ve lived in Ohio — born and raised or truly new to OSU — you probably do not love the cold. We’ve all seen our newsfeeds become filled with negative comments the minute the first frost hits and first flakes of snow fall.

The freezing temperatures make it hard to muster the effort to leave your residence hall, especially if you live on the outskirts of campus. As a former Lincoln Tower resident, I understand this well.

But fear not, because Columbus offers plenty to do beyond your residence hall (but still within the warmth of the great indoors). All of these places are accessible by Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) buses; check Google Maps or a COTA schedule for details.

1. Columbus Museum of Art

Columbus-Museum-of-Art-Medium

I visited the Columbus Museum of Art just a few weekends ago, and while it’s small, it is definitely worth a trip. There is currently an exhibit called “In __ We Trust: Art and Money,” which includes a really cool mural created by thousands of pieces of dollar bills, rearranged to make new pictures. This particular exhibit is on display until March 1.

This is a great spot to take a date, to bring a friend or to visit alone. Admission is only $8 for students and the museum’s downtown location makes it a fun day trip away from campus, accessible on a budget.

2. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

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Just down the street from the art museum is the ultimate place to be inside in the winter. The Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens allows you to escape reality for a day and surround yourself with long-out-of-season blooming flowers and plants.

The indoor gardens and art displays are the perfect distraction from the bitter chill outside. Bring a friend for a day trip or a book to get lost in among the flowers; either way you’ll be able to transport yourself back to sunnier times. Admission is $10 for students.

3. North Market

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Already sick of the same five campus dining locations you frequent? Head downtown for the ultimate variety of food from all over the world including Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, fresh produce and other fun shops.

In addition to the fantastic food offered there, the North Market is a great place to spend the afternoon people watching, catching up with friends, or studying for class in the expansive seating area on the second floor. Head back when the weather is warm, and you can even get your meal to go and enjoy eating it in nearby Goodale Park.

4. Center of Science and Industry (COSI)

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COSI is perhaps one of the coolest places that students take the least advantage of in Columbus. For some of us, COSI is a place our Girl or Boy Scout troops visited when we were younger, while for others it’s a foreign land. But for any college student, COSI is a really cool place to learn more about science and the universe.

In addition to its exhibits on topics such as energy, space, the ocean and life, COSI recently opened its planetarium — which, though it costs $5 more to visit, includes some really interesting shows about the universe. Admission to COSI is $19 for adults and students.

5. Columbus Blue Jackets game

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If you’ve never given hockey a chance, being a student in Columbus gives you the perfect opportunity. There are two ways for students to get cheap tickets to a Blue Jackets game: with D-Tix, through the Ohio Union, and through CBJ student rush tickets.

Hockey is sometimes swept aside and is perhaps less dominant in a country (and city) obsessed with football. But now that the Buckeyes are officially done (and undisputed champions), why not check out another Columbus team? Hockey is really easy to get into, and supporting your city makes it a win-win. Games are held at Nationwide Arena downtown.

 

New Year’s Resolutions for a Healthy, Successful Second Semester

It’s that time of year again! The start of a new semester, a fresh slate, and a Twitter feed full of #NewYearNewMe posts. Everyone wants to make positive changes for the new year, but sometimes following through can be a little tricky, especially for busy, broke college students. I’m here to offer you five easy resolutions that can make your academic, professional, and personal life that much better in 2015!

Dedicate time to go the RPAC a few times a week (and not just for the food at Courtside Cafe).

As Ohio State students, we are blessed to have such a beautiful facility at our disposal. Take advantage of the many resources it houses such as group fitness classes, personal training, and wellness coaching! When you’re done, you can treat yourself to the sauna, the hot tub, or even a massage!

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Drop the “college kid” diet.

Yes, we know. Ramen Noodles are good. They don’t really do much for you, though. Give your body the fuel it deserves with fruits, vegetables, whole grains and protein. Also, take a couple minutes and visit the University Dining website to see what’s in the foods YOU are buying at the dining halls. Need help making healthy food choices? The Student Wellness Center in the RPAC can help you design a plan that’s tailored to your body’s specific needs! Lastly, when grabbing last minute items to “fill” a block, try those Good Greens Bars instead of chips or cookies!

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Keep yourself, and your space, organized!

Sharing a space with one, two, or three other people can be hard. Sharing a messy and cluttered space is ten times harder. Do yourself (and your roommates) a favor by clearing out any junk that may have accumulated from last semester. This means the fridge, any common areas, desks, and closet space. I know you’re sick of accidentally grabbing your roommate’s socks instead of your own, or smelling that General Tso’s Chicken that’s been on the top shelf since October. Do you find yourself forgetting important deadlines or losing class notes? Invest in one (or more) of the following!

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Start preparing for midterm exams NOW!

I know it’s hard to even acknowledge the existence of midterms after just finishing up “Syllabus Week”, but after last semester we all know that they have a way of sneaking up on us. Start organizing your notes now by keeping them in a safe and easy-access spot, like a binder or computer file, so that they will be easier to find and study from later. Also, start study guides of important tidbits your professors say in class (listen for “this will be on the exam”, or “this would make a good exam question”).

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Branch out and meet new Buckeyes!

College isn’t just about passing classes and getting a degree. Make time to meet new people and get involved on campus! Little things like keeping your door open when you’re in your room or suggesting you and some floor mates go on a “dinner date” to Sloopy’s can make a difference in your semester! Take the leap and start a conversation with the person next to you in class. They might be involved in a club or organization you might be interested in!

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Remember me? That Bernie guy…

Oh hey! I remember you; you’re that funny guy from Orientation!

That’s how most you of know me. At least that’s what you say when you see me on campus. Yes, I was the guy who welcomed you to Orientation. It’s a great job, it really is. But sadly, that’s probably the last time most of you saw me or my colleagues in First Year Experience. And why should we expect any different. We work on the third floor of the Student Academic Services building on the far edge of campus. You have no reason to wander up here.

Many of you are probably still connected to your Orientation Leader, right? I’m sure they may help you from time to time. “Yes, but Bernie, they don’t actually work for you anymore,” you might say. That’s right. The summer is over. The red polo shirts have been retired.

[End scene]

My colleagues and I started a conversation just like this a little over a year ago. It wasn’t hard to figure out that we’ve been doing this all wrong. The people you might actually listen to, connect with and reach out to when you have a question (your peers, that is)…we let those people go. Every August. And now, during the school year, we’re hoping you’ll listen to us. A bunch of staff members who haven’t been college students for 10 or even 20 years. Heck, my son is closer to your age and he’s nine.

So, I hope you’re not offended, but starting this fall, when it comes time to actually connect with you, it won’t be me or my colleagues leading the charge anymore. Instead, we’re going to let you connect with and talk to a fellow student. And not some random upper-class student you haven’t met before (because honestly, that’s always awkward) but those same students you’ve come to know and trust because they helped you feel at home, get some answers and have a great time at Orientation.

Now, there will be a slight change. We won’t call them Orientation Leaders anymore. They’ll be so much more than that. They’ll meet and help new students like you over the summer at Orientation, just like they always did, but now they’ll stay in touch, answer your questions and help you explore Ohio State all throughout the year. And the new name: FYE Peer Leaders. Simple, right?

I have a hunch that some of you (if you’ve read this far), might be thinking, “Bernie, how can I apply for this new Peer Leader job?” Well, I have good news for you. The application is available now (through January 30). All you have to do is go to our webpage to find out more about applying. I hope you’ll watch the short video and maybe even join us this month at an info session.

The one catch is that this job isn’t for everyone, and you may not be ready…just yet. I say that because I remember applying for a pretty amazing job on campus my first year, one that had the potential to impact other students. I started the process, filled out the application and even successfully made it through the group interview. But then, just before getting the final word, I removed myself from the process. Why? Well, I knew I wasn’t ready yet. I barely knew myself, how was I going to help others. I still had some growing up to do. The next year, my sophomore year, I applied again. And this time I stayed with the process. The very next fall I became an RA in Taylor Tower and had the time of my life helping other students.

I hope, when the time is right, you’ll apply to be an FYE Peer Leader. First-year students need people like you in their lives. We understand that now.

Top 5 Places to Study on Campus

With the remaining three days of finals week, the only thing we’re supposed to be thinking about is studying. However, by now, with some students already finished with their finals, you may have experienced moments where your “freed” peers are too loud for you to get any work done. Let’s be honest here, the last thing we want to do is be studying, but changing up where you do it can give you the little jolt of motivation that you may need.

1. 18th Avenue Library

The 18th Avenue Library is near and dear to north campus dwellers. With its three floors and hundreds of computers, it’s a great place to study. It’s also an amazing place gather with your friends because of its more conversation-friendly spaces. One example is the third floor, a place free from the scary “hear-a-pin-drop” silence of other library  locations.

Pros:

  • Open 24/7
  • Has a café on the main floor

Cons:

  • Smaller than Thompson
  • Not as aesthetically pleasing (but who has time to look at anything apart from your textbooks anyway?)

2. Thompson Library

This is a favorite place for many students and with approximately 1,800 places to sit, it’s the largest of Ohio State’s 12 libraries. It also has rooms that you can book in advance for you to study with your friends. When inside, be sure to check out the 11th floor’s spectacular view!

*Tip: The Buckeye Grand Reading room is a popular spot, so make sure that once you nag a seat you stay there!

Pros:

  • Berry Café on the main floor
  • It’s an overall beautiful place

Cons:

  • It’s super easy to get distracted by people watching

3. Keith B. Key Center for Student Leadership and Service 

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This corner of the Union near the resource room is a great spot to study. A ton of student organizations have their offices in this area, and generally, it is one of the quieter areas of the Union.  There’s always stuff going on in the building, so you can grab a bite or see what’s going on around campus during your study breaks. In addition, if you ask the front desk within the resource room, you can rent out some of the office spaces in the leadership center for free.

Pros:

  • Access to food, social areas and many locations
  • Private study rooms may be available

Cons:

  • It’s easy to get distracted
  • Often busy

4. Orton Library

Orton Hall is the building with the famous bell tower.  Within the building is a hidden gem, the library on the first floor; it is very homey and has the coolest little nooks to work in. In addition, it’s pretty small and quiet, so you won’t have to fear as many distractions.

Pros:

  • Quiet and cozy

Cons:

  • No food
  • Small
  • Fewer outlets
  • Limited hours

5. Various tutoring centers on campus

This can really vary depending on your major and department and on your teacher. However, for those who are taking larger lecture classes (chemistry or math), these areas can be great resources where you can study and get help at the same time. They centers vary by location and specific hours, so make sure to check with your professors, TA’s and class resources to see if one is available for you.

Pros:

  • One-on-one help

Cons:

  • Dependent on class
  • Time restrictions
  • Often busy

For additional study spots and altered library hours check library.osu.edu. Happy studying and good luck with the rest of your finals!