Adopting an Attitude of Gratitude

This time last year, my semester in Spain was coming to an end. I was lucky enough to have been invited to spend the holidays in a suburb of Madrid. My friend’s father played guitar and led a chorus of 45 family members through song and prayer before a feast of traditional Spanish cuisine. I was truly overwhelmed, simultaneously feeling both extreme joy and sadness. Comparing my family to hers, and wishing that we were as strong a unit, diminished my ability to be fully present in the celebration.

A few days later on a plane back to Granada, I told the man sitting next to me about my recent holiday in Madrid and about my family in America. Since my parents’ divorce, the holidays have been a source of great sadness for me. My new conversation partner responded in a way that I didn’t anticipate. He said,

You have a choice. You can focus on what you don’t have or you can focus on all that you do.

I have thought about this statement every day since.

gratitude 2This interaction on the plane awakened me. Why could I only recall feeling grateful on good days, but on the days where I struggled, I hadn’t practiced any gratitude. When there are burdens, struggles, and drama, it’s hard to feel grateful. However, we are faced with a decision: do we wait until life gets better again or can we start where we are, in the midst of problems and challenges? Gratitude starts with each of us exactly where we are. Instead of waiting for a positive experience in order to feel grateful, we have the ability to bring gratitude to each and every day.

Before I knew the power of gratitude, I was stuck. Yes, my family is a bit fragmented. But how much greater would it have felt to tell that man on the plane that both of my parents are my biggest fans, who support my dreams to live and study abroad? In the year since this interaction, I can attest that practicing gratitude has brought a sense of peace to my life that I didn’t know possible. Why? Because gratitude is a reciprocal process. When you show someone you’re grateful for them, it boosts your own self-esteem and happiness.


Let’s start now! As we head into the holiday break, make a mental list of the people in your life who you value. For first-year students: who has supported you through your transition to college? Who has worked to make you feel comfortable at Ohio State and who are you grateful to have met? Use your abilities to bring gratitude to each day. Start by letting those faculty members, advisors, Residence Life staff, peer leaders, family, and friends that you are thankful for their presence in your life. I challenge you to start with just one person. Gratitude catches on and spreads like wildfire. In no time, we will have cultivated a culture of gratitude in the Ohio State community.


Thank you for reading.



15 alternatives to the Mirror Lake jump

As you likely know by now, the Mirror Lake jump–a recent tradition that precedes the football game against TTUN–is slated to take place on Tuesday night. While many students may be participating (and will do so responsibly, we hope!), there are likely just as many–or more–of you who have no plans to splash around in dirty water in near-freezing temperatures. For those of you undecided about your Tuesday night plans, here are 15 alternatives to the Mirror Lake jump:

1. Get a head start on the drive home…all of the freeway lanes, none of the traffic.

2. Try out that Short North restaurant you’ve been eyeing since the start of the semester.

3. Create your own Thanksgiving meal using only items from a campus C-Store, a la “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving”:

4. Get a bird’s eye view of the jump (and your pick of the best rocking chair) from the 11th floor of Thompson library.

5. Listen to TBDBITL music on repeat…or at least until it starts to annoy your roommate(s).

6. Reread “The Hunger Games” in preparation for the final movie in the franchise…or just see the movie with your DTix discount at Gateway Film Center.

7. Watch the Ohio State Men’s basketball team take on Louisiana Tech on the Big Ten Network (8 p.m.).

8. Practice your response to holiday inquiries from family, questions like: 

What are you hoping to do with a major in [insert your major here]-

9. Try to get your own hashtag trending.

10. Wash your sheets…maybe for the first time all semester?

11. Watch all the Thanksgiving episodes of your favorite TV show(s).

12. Memorize random facts about Ohio State football players to show your true dedication to the game. For example:

Can you imagine how crowded the Jones family dinner table was when Cardale was a kid? I don’t know how he and his five siblings–Matthew, Javon, Devonte, Sheena and Naomi–all fit!

That Perry kid has got some moves…I guess that’s why he was in the top five in long jump at the Ohio high school state track and field championships. His parents, Jim and Georgette, must be so proud!

13. Create a playlist of the American Music Award winners for the drive/flight home (looking at you, 1D).

14. Stuff your face at PizzaPalooza (10 p.m.-midnight, Ohio Union west plaza).

15. Find at least eight of your closest friends to recreate this YouTube vid (admittedly more appropriate before our loss on Saturday):

Happy Beat M!ch!g@n Week, everyone!

Little Known Facts About Better Known Traditions

Whether the climate agrees or not, we’re past the halfway point of November already, and you know what that means? We’re less than a week away from The Game! Being a first-year student in such a spirited community of Buckeyes can be daunting from an academic standpoint, let alone having to learn traditions and other nuances that go into being a Buckeye through and through. Ever wanted to know how a few of these came to be some of the most recognizable traditions in the country? If so, today’s your lucky day!

Buckeye Grove

In a ceremony before the spring game, Buckeye trees are planted in Buckeye Grove for each Ohio State All-American football player from the previous season. Next time you’re over on West Campus, take a walk through the nature! Rumor has it that officials are renaming it “Buckeye Forest” because we have so many trees since WE’RE JUST THAT GOOD! (The last sentence is totally made up…except the part about us being awesome, because we are).

  • The original location of the grove was the southwest corner of the original stadium, but after renovations, the grove moved to its current location between Ohio Stadium, Morrill Tower, and the RPAC
  • Each tree has its own plaque, distinguishing the name of the player whom the tree is dedicated to
  • Since the Urban Meyer era of our football team, after the spring game, the players, coaches and administrators from the losing Scarlet team are in charge of cleaning up and sprucing up the grove as a way to raise the stakes in the spring game and do a good deed at the same time! Classic Urban.

 The “O-H! I-O!” Chant

Nowadays you can shout “O-H!” just about anywhere in Columbus the world and get an “I-O!” in response from some passing stranger. No joke, I was in Guam International Airport a few years back and I jokingly yelled out “O-H!” just for fun. Believe it or not, I got an “I-O”! Moral of the story is that time you’re on a random U.S. territorial island in the middle of the Pacific, give the ol’ O-H a shot, it’s guaranteed to work EVERY time. (Again, last sentence isn’t even close to being true so if you believed it for a second, that’s on you)

O-H-I-O with Big BenEaster Island

  • In 1942, a group of U.S. Navy sailors aboard the USS Lexington in the Pacific Ocean began chanting “O-H-I-O S-T-A-T-E” to the tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat.” Several of those displaced Buckeye fanatics returned to Ohio and enrolled at Ohio State in the fall of 1946.
  • One of them, Matthew Sidley, joined the cheerleading squad the following autumn. On Nov. 1, 1947, during a losing effort against Indiana, Sidley decided to teach the “O-H-I-O S-T-A-T-E” cheer to fans at Ohio Stadium.
  • The full nine-letter chant proved too difficult for the student body to keep up, so they eventually settled on chanting “O-H-I-O” and leaving it at that.
  • Apparently the cheer was so energizing to the players that 1947 OSU linebacker Dick Flanagan called it “…a turning point in Ohio State football.”
  • The cheer squad tried to bring back the original “O-H-I-O S-T-A-T-E” chant in 1982, but apparently a conglomerate of higher education individuals couldn’t wrap their head around spelling OHIO STATE to the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat. SMH.
  • The sailors who invented the “O-H-I-O” chant also created the hand symbols that have become a global phenomenon. Much creativity. Such wow.

 “Carmen Ohio”

Singing Carmen has got to be my favorite Buckeye tradition. The sense of pride swaying and singing along with 100,000 of your closest friends is almost indescribable! If you haven’t gotten the opportunity to check out a home football game yet, I highly recommend doing so even if you aren’t a football fan!

  • “Carmen” means song in Latin, so the title literally translates to “Song of Ohio”
  • “Carmen Ohio” is the oldest song still in use at Ohio State
  • Carmen was first performed by the Glee Club in 1903 after freshman four-letter athlete and Glee Club singer Fred Cornell re-wrote the lyrics to the tune of Christian H Bateman’s hymn “Come Christians, Join To Sing”.
  • Some say Cornell wrote the song on the train ride home after our Buckeyes suffered a brutal 86-0 loss to TTUN. Never again.
  • Carmen is sung after every single sporting event, win, lose, or draw!
  • In 1927, then band director Jack Evans and arranger Richard Heine adapted the song for the marching band to play and added the sound of the chimes from the Orton Hall bells as its intro

 Script Ohio

I’ve seen TBDBITL perform many a time in my days here at Ohio State, but every time they march out there, it mesmerizes me how perfect Script Ohio is! There’s a reason why it’s been called “The Greatest Tradition in College Football” In my opinion, there’s no way it doesn’t crack the top 10 greatest college traditions PERIOD. It’s definitely a sight to behold each and every time the Ohio State Marching Band takes the field.

  • The first marching band to form the word Ohio on a football field was actually *!ch!&an’s marching band! In 1932, those guys visited Ohio Stadium, and spelled out ‘OHIO’ during their halftime show
  • The famous Script Ohio made its debut four years later, on Oct. 10, 1936 at Ohio State’s football game against Pittsburgh. Band director Eugene J. Weigel had the idea for the formation after seeing the looping script Downtown at Loew’s Ohio Theatre

Each and every year, the last couple weeks of college football’s regular season gets me so excited (and not just because it means turkey and gravy). Being a part of something bigger than yourself is something that I believe is so important in everyone’s lives, and we all are so fortunate to have the opportunity to be Buckeyes at THE Ohio State University!

Ohio State Spotlight: The Application for Special Scholarships

Recently I had the chance to talk with Ellen S. who works in Student Financial Aid, specifically with Special Scholarships. She was able to provide me with answers to my questions as well as give me some advice on certain things that they like to see on the application.

What is it?

The Special Scholarships application enables Ohio State students to be considered for several thousands of special-eligibility scholarships that encompass a wide variety of eligibility criteria. The application is also free, just like the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

How many scholarships are offered?

Thousands upon hundreds of scholarships.

What do I need to do to apply?

First, access the application through the Student Financial Aid website. Students are encouraged to fill out both their FAFSA and the Application for Special Scholarships by the priority date of February 15.

The application asks basic questions regarding a student’s activities and affiliations, family information, and diversity. It also asks for a personal statement. [Cue dramatic music]

I’m only a freshman–How could I ever have enough to write a personal statement?

Don’t panic: the Financial Aid office understands that by the time this application is due, first-year students have been in college for less than a year. While it’s okay to highlight personal accomplishments from high school, take some time to reflect back on your first year and the things that make you proud. Maybe you can write about a professor that you’ve gotten a chance to know better, or about some affiliations–student organizations, religious groups, residence hall, etc.–that you have on campus.

The personal statement prompt has no structure or format but does require that you stick to the 900-word limit. The application gives students some prompts to get your started, but you are not required to stick to those. Make sure to talk about some things that you can bring to the Ohio State community, as well as some of the struggles that you’ve had to overcome. It is recommended that you complete your personal statement in a Word document or similar software that can be copied and pasted into the application text box; if the application timer (found at the bottom of the application page) runs out, your response will not be saved.

Common mistakes to avoid?


In a world where everyone is more text-savvy, it’s easy to forget how to properly use certain words and punctuation. Make sure to have someone proofread your work before submitting any of your essays. You can check the Writing Center’s walk-in hours in Thompson Library to get some quick feedback on your writing.

Having an “okay” personal statement

The personal statement is where you need to shine. When talking about how a scholarship can help you, an “alright” answer would be “College is expensive.” A better way to answer this question is to take some time to reflect on how a scholarship can help to alleviate some of the stresses in your life , or how it can help you accomplish some of your long-term goals.

I hope this has inspired you to get started on your Special Scholarships application! Financial Aid wants to award as many of its scholarships to as many students as possible, so take some time–winter break is a terrific option–to complete your application by February 15!

Top 5 Songs from Freshman Year

Everyone has those songs that take them back to a certain time and place. These songs take me back to room 1256 in Taylor Tower circa 2013 (this was before the North Residential District Project, just imagine North Campus without all of the construction–crazy, huh?) and sharing deejay duties with my roommates. For better or worse, these are the songs that will forever remind me of my #new2osu days and my freshman year.

“Thrift Shop” Macklemore & Ryan Lewis featuring Wanz

My roommate was obsessed with Macklemore, so this song could often be heard playing in our room. Whether you love or hate this song, you have to admit that it is catchy and can easily be stuck in your head for hours. It managed to be named Billboard’s #1 hottest song in 2013. I’m still not sure what all the lyrics mean, but hey, who doesn’t want to “wear your granddad’s clothes” while looking incredible?

“We Can’t Stop” Miley Cyrus

Miley Cyrus was having a moment my freshman year. She left her Hannah Montana days behind her (sadly) and smashed into the pop music scene “like a wrecking ball.” Her VMA performance with Robin Thicke and that foam finger was a hot topic of discussion around campus for two straight weeks.

“Cruise” Florida Georgia Line featuring Nelly

I absolutely LOVE this song, probably because of my obsession Nelly (I may or may not know every word to “Grillz” and “Air Force Ones”). It’s such a feel good song and when you add NELLY to the track it makes it that much better. This was one of the first times, and arguably the most successful time, that two completely different genres were combined to produce a top hit.

“Counting Stars” OneRepublic

OneRepublic makes my list due to their free concert at the Schottenstein Center that was absolutely amazing! I went to the concert mostly because my friends wanted to go, but I left a OneRepublic fan. “Counting Stars” really hit it big (I like to believe that my roommate playing it at least 100,000 times helped) on the charts and in the hearts of Ohio State students.

“Story of My Life” One Direction

I had to include at least one of my boy band favs, so this choice is extremely biased. This song was released my freshman year and is still probably my all time favorite 1D song (their new album, Made in the A.M. dropped today though, so this may/probably will change because this is their best album yet). Nothing creates a bond between people as instantaneously as talk about a boy band; I have debated the best parts of the “Story of My Life” music video with many people and made quite a few friends doing it. Reminiscing on my freshmen year is not complete without this song!

Ask anyone and I am sure they can think of at least one song that defines their freshmen year of college. What songs will be on your list? I have a feeling that Shut Up and Dance may make your list because it definitely defines my summer of orientation with y’all!

Second Year Roommates

Sharing a confined space with another living, breathing creature–and I’m not talking about your fish or body pillow–can be difficult. In my first year, I was challenged going from my own room at home with a bed big enough for my entire graduating class to a room half that size and a bed that was barely big enough for my Brutus pillow pet and me. Add three more people–strangers–to that space and life has never been the same. Those roommates I was forced to share bunk beds with turned out to be some of my best friends, but that isn’t always the case.

For some, it may seem as though school started yesterday, and here we are ten weeks later and the test are getting more difficult, we’ve become dependent on taco salads from the RPAC for survival (or is that just me?), and students are already making housing plans for the coming year. Whether you’ve found someone you plan to live with the rest of your life or you are a Nervous Nelly worried that it’s too late to find compatible living buddies, these second-year housing tips may be useful for anyone:

There are few things in life you have to be selfish about, but housing may be one of those things.

Whether you are living in a cave, your parent’s basement after graduation (oh no!), or the 37th floor of the Empire State building, that is YOUR home. When it comes to deciding where to live and who to live with, make sure you are comfortable and can come to consensus with your roommate(s). The last thing you want is to spend a year of your life unhappy trying to please someone else. Never agree to live with someone or somewhere out of guilt. Those tough conversations are hard to have, but you will be much happier in the long run…trust me.

Best friends are not the best roommates and roommates do not have to be your best friends.

Because of what we see in pop culture, we often come to college with an unrealistic expectation that our roommates are going to be our best friends and we will all live happily ever after drinking hot chocolate and having pillow fights every night until 2 a.m. When this turns out to not be the case, the perfect vision we created in our heads of college is no longer and we start to compare our experience to others. The best roommates are simply people who have compatible living habits. You do not need to be best friends; you simply need to get along. In fact, you may want to also consider not rooming with your best friends, simply to protect your friendship. Although they may be a great companion, they may have living habits that get under your skin. Find that perfect balance between good friend and compatible living habits, and you have the perfect match!

The Golden Rule: treat your roommate how you want to be treated.

If you do not like to come home to passive-aggressive Post-It notes, do not leave them for your roommate. If you do not like moldy food in your living quarters, store your leftover taco salad in the fridge. If you like to go to bed by midnight, study at the library or down the hall in a common area when you roommate wants to sleep. Chances are that the small things that get under your skin get under your roommates skin as well. Don’t do anything to your room or your roommate that you would not want them to do to your room or you.

Address a situation when it arises.

If you find that your roommate is violating the roommate contract or doing something that you do not appreciate, address the situation as soon as possible in a face-to-face conversation. The sooner you address the situation, the better things will become. Gossiping with your friends down the hallway will not make the problem go away. The last thing you want is to build up anger or frustration toward them for something they may not even realize they are doing. These conversations may be hard to have in the moment, but can have positive impacts on the roommate relationship in the long run.

Share the snacks that Mom sends.

This is mega important for your friendship, especially when Rice Krispies treats are involved.

Deciding to go random for my roommate(s) was one of the best decisions I ever made and I do not know if our Ohio State paths would have crossed if it were not for the lovely housing office that put us together. As you can see, living with another person is hard. A lot of the time it takes patience and every once in a while a hard conversation, but by keeping these rules in mind, you are bound to have a great year!

Bus confusion? 5 tips and 5 routes!

It’s November and it’s about to get real cold, real quick. If you are anything like I was as a freshman, the only thing I knew about the buses was that the CABS was the Campus Area Bus System and the COTA had routes throughout Columbus…but I had no idea how to use them or the difference between routes.

CABS versus COTA

If you read nothing else, here are five tips for the bus system…

CLN versus CLS

For the CLN (Campus Loop North) and CLS (Campus Loop South), the North and South references the direction the bus travels on CANNON Drive. Since it’s a loop, it goes the opposite direction on College Road (the CLN travels SOUTH on College Road, whereas the CLS travels NORTH on College Road). They make the exact same loop–just opposite directions. Also, the CLN runs on weekends, but the CLS does not (be aware that the route is slightly different on the weekends–check the Bus app for details).

CABS bus

Requesting stops

CABS: The bus will stop at every stop (so no need to pull the yellow cord).

COTA: The bus will only stop if you pull the yellow cord around the perimeter of the bus to request a stop or if someone is waiting at that COTA stop to get on the bus.

Interior of COTA

Electronic bus tracking

CABS: You can get up to date bus information on the Ohio State mobile app or the OSU Bus app. The thing I really like about the OSU Bus app is it will utilize the location services on my phone to find stops “Near Me” and give me up to date information about how many minutes until the next bus will arrive!

COTA: If you are riding the COTA, I have found the easiest way to know when a bus is coming is to utilize the Google Maps app, and then click the icon for public transportation. It will give directions of exactly where to pick up the bus, what time it is scheduled to come, how many stops to take the bus, and where to walk once I get off the bus to reach my destination. However, this information is not updated if a bus is running behind schedule, it only gives a rough estimate based on when it is scheduled to come!Bus App Screenshot

What to bring when you ride

CABS: Nothing.

COTA: Swipe your BuckID at the front of the bus OR pay $2

Always thank the bus drivers!

…and here are five routes to know…

CABS: CLN (Campus Loop North)

Where it goes: North on Cannon (by Morrill and Lincoln Towers), left on Woodruff to the Carmack parking lots, back east on Woodruff (by Knowlton and Traditions at Scott), turns right down College Road (heading south), to the Union, and then turns right down 12th Avenue (by Baker East/West and then down past Kennedy Commons), turns left on Neil (goes by Marketplace), then turns right on 9th Avenue and travels around the perimeter of the Med Center and back up Cannon.

When it runs: All day everyday! (Less frequently during at night and on weekends)

CABS: CLS (Campus Loop South)

Where it goes: Same route but opposite direction as the CLN!

When it runs: Mon-Fri, 5:30 a.m.-midnight

CABS: NE (North Express)

Where it goes: East on 17th Avenue (the street just North of the Oval), turns left on College road (north), left on Woodruff (heading west) out to the Carmack parking lots, then comes back down Woody Hayes/Woodruff (the street name changes!), and then turns right on Tuttle Park Place down to the RPAC plaza and then back up 17th again!

When it runs: Mon-Fri, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

COTA: #2 (#21 at night)

Where it goes: This bus runs up and down High Street. The different letters after the number 2 distinguish how far north and south it will go. This bus comes about every 9 minutes. The 21 is the “Night Owl” version of the 2 and comes about every 30 minutes.

When it runs: #2–everyday! #21–Thu-Sat, 7 p.m.-3 a.m. (depending where you are on the route)

COTA: #52

Where it goes: This route is the OSU Airport Express and runs a special route on peak travel days from campus to the airport. It has 6 stops around campus and then goes to the airport. Be aware that it only runs certain days of the year!

When it runs: Check this schedule for dates and times.

CABS Routes

Love the Skin You’re in!

How many times have you asked yourself, “Ugh! Do I look fat in this?” or, “How many calories are in [insert some ridiculously small portion of something here]?” or maybe even, “If I ask for seconds, will you judge?” Society has made us question ourselves far too long.

 2011 VH1 Do Something Awards - Arrivals

Last year, Demi Levato said, “Kim Kardashian revolutionized our generation’s view of what beautiful is.” This view of beautiful is not realistic…at all. Perfect curves are not everyone’s reality, especially in college. The real question is,

How do I love the skin that I am in?

Great question! I am here to give you five tips as to how and why you should stop shaming yourself based on what you THINK you should look like.

Stop comparing yourself to others!

Just don’t do it. Accept yourself for who you are. Who says that you should look like the Victoria’s Secret model or have a perfect “beach bod”? Don’t listen to what society depicts as “beauty”. Beauty isn’t a certain shape, size, or color.


Get off of the scale…please.

College is stressful, so it is possible that your weight will fluctuate. However, not only is “Freshman 15” a myth, it’s a surface-level concept. Besides, “healthy” isn’t always “skinny” and beauty isn’t only skin-deep. It goes beyond that!



Instead of focusing on what you don’t have, focus on what you do have.

Make a list of things that you like about yourself. Appreciate the small things–whether that’s a widow’s peak, a gray hair, or a stretch mark–they’re what make you YOU! If everyone was the same, how much fun would that be? Remember, the grass isn’t always greener on the other side of the fence, and we are ALL human.


If YOU don’t like it, do something.

Notice “you” is in all caps. What I mean is if you don’t like something about yourself, then make those changes for you. Don’t make them because someone else told you to or someone else told you that you were not good enough. That’s not true! It’s your life; your opinion is the only one that matters.


Surround yourself with positive people.

Live your life according to your values and beliefs. Never feel pressured by those around you to be someone who you are not. Confide in family members, friends, and/or your Peer Leader, and seek out your support system when needed. You cannot change the people around you, but you CAN change the people around you.


Culture can be a strong influence on our depiction of beauty, but it shouldn’t be. Media, TV, and movies should not be the preferred method for ideas of what a “perfect body” looks like because it simply doesn’t exist. Self-love and self-image SHOULD be at the upmost importance. Just remember, you are NEVER alone. If you ever have any concerns or struggling with self-esteem or body image issues, please visit Counseling and Consultation Services website to make an appointment to talk to a professional, you can meet with seek out the Student Wellness center for wellness coaching. Always remember to love the skin you’re in!


The Hidden Gems of Ohio State Classes

All colleges at Ohio State give students the opportunity to take General Education courses, commonly known as GEs. Some students will spread out these classes over their entire college career, and some will get many of them done in the same semester; either way, you will often hear students talk about how much they dislike their GEs. I am here to tell you that GEs are awesome! You can take so many interesting, intellectually stimulating, fun classes! Here are some of the amazing classes you can find here at Ohio State!

EARTHSC 1151: Natural Hazards – Occurrence and cause of earthquakes, volcanoes, and related hazards, and impact on climate, society, and history.

DANCE 3401: Dance in Popular Culture – Popular dance in the United States, with an emphasis on how movement constructs identity and community. (You only actually try to dance a few times) PL Libby’s pick

GERMAN 3252: The Holocaust in German Literature and Film — Reading, analysis, and discussion of representative works pertaining to the Holocaust from the perspective of German literature and film. Taught in English

HDFS 2367: American Family Issues – Critically examine family and related community issues. PL Kayla’s pick for her second writing course

HISTART 2901: Introduction to World Cinema—Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.

FDSCTE 1110: Chocolate Science — Introduction to science and business of chocolate. Students develop and market a chocolate product as part of a virtual company. Students taste commercial products.

ARTEDUC 2367.03: Criticizing Television – A critical analysis of a wide variety of television programs through viewing, discussing, readying and writing. PL Julie’s pick

ARTSSCI 4870:  The Ohio State University: Its History and Its World — An introduction to the past and present of Ohio State, its importance, its disciplines, the interrelations of the academic and other components of the institution, and the contributions over the years of Ohio State to the wider world

SOCIOL 2210: Sociological Aspects of Deviance – Study of the definition, identification, treatment, and control of types of legal, moral, and status deviance, such as crimes, mental illness, alcoholism, and other individual pathologies.

EDUTL 2368: Introduction to Children’s Literature – Students study the historical and contemporary elements of literature intended for children, including picture books; traditional tales; novels of realism, and fantasy; nonfiction; poetry; and multicultural books.

When Stress is Too Much

School is stressful. And having a little bit of stress in your life is good—it keeps you motivated and makes life interesting. But too much stress can be unhealthy. And other times, stress is a symptom, not the problem. So, when is stress too much to handle and when is it time to figure things out? Well, let’s take a look at a couple indicators of when you might need to take your stress to a doctor.

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, and what I say should not be used as a reason to NOT go to a doctor. If you have any question about it at all, it is better to get it sorted out as soon as possible!


Here’s the real deal: typical stress has a lot of the same symptoms as many other underlying causes. Take clinical depression, for example (I am EXTREMELY passionate about depression). Both stress and depression share the symptoms of feeling bad about yourself, avoiding others, feeling overwhelmed and a lack of control, and becoming easily agitated or moody. A lot of other physical health issues have similar symptoms, as well. So, how do you know whether stress is the problem or if stress is just a symptom? My general rule of thumb for this is if you experience five differences between your normal self and your “stressed out” self, you should see a doctor. For me, if I am experiencing a difficult time sleeping, a lack of motivation, an agitated mood, and two other symptoms, I know that I need to go to my doctor! Once again, this is not all-encompassing. Even if you have just one symptom, you still have reason to go see a doctor. Always check with your doctor if you have any concerns.

Time period

Stress is usually dependent on the stressors of your life. These stressors may include family or social pressures, upcoming midterms or assignments, a lack of sleep, etc. But when the stress lasts even after the stressor is gone, you might want to take a closer look at it. My general rule of thumb is two weeks, but this is just a recommendation. If you notice any of the symptoms talked about previously that last more than two weeks, check with your doctor!

How it affects your daily life

Especially regarding mental health, a big factor in treatment is how your life is affected by the illness. But for anything in life–if you notice a decline in your grades, a decline in enjoyment in fun activities, or a decline in your social life–it may be a reason to check with your doctor. Stress should only impact your life in minor ways. In my experience, the agitated mood I used to get would negatively impact my relationships with everyone I interacted with on a daily basis. And when I realized that I was losing my friends because of my mood, I realized I needed to make a change!

And finally…

Whether the issue is stress or something more, there is help available! Check out the many resources the Counseling and Consultation Services has to offer by going to their website or by going to Let’s Talk, which offers free and confidential drop-in consultations in the Lower Level Meeting Room at the Union on Thursdays from 2:30-4:30. Or go to the Wilce Student Health Center for a check-up and overall health care. You can make an appointment online, by phone, or in person. Maybe you just need some time to relax and destress or learn about stress and time management. If this is the case, you can check out the First Year Success Series to register for a session, and get credit for your survey class!

Being stressed out in college is normal–but not a reason to deny yourself help if you become over-stressed or if you need some time to de-stress. Being proactive and listening to your body will benefit you in the long run, especially if something else is contributing to your feelings of stress. Put your wellness in a professionals hands. Your future self will thank your present self.