Football Disappointment

Singing Carmen Ohio after a home game

Singing Carmen Ohio after a home game

After clinching the 2014 National Championship title for football (and sooo many other sports, too!), I had high expectations for our football team this year. I was hoping that I would be able to witness TWO National Championship titles. But, even the first game against Virginia Tech showed that our team needed a lot of improvement in order to get to that title. And yet, no big deal–we improved last year enough to win, and we would do it again this year, too! And, hey, at least this year we beat Virginia Tech. We could do it.

Unfortunately, as the season went on and we improved, it showed that we weren’t improving fast enough. And that effect culminated during the Michigan State game. I was crushed watching those last thirty seconds and that ball flying through the goal posts. It didn’t seem real for us to lose because I hadn’t witnessed a Buckeye loss in so long.

Some of you may have come to Ohio State for the school spirit, traditions, and the excitement surrounding our football team. Some of you may also be Cleveland Browns fans and are just excited that the Buckeyes can gain 6 points in a way besides two field goals, as my roommate (and Cleveland sports fan), Madeline, says. Some of you may not care about football…at all.

Whether or not you are a football fan, we can all celebrate the successes of our fellow Buckeyes. Let’s celebrate Braxton’s spin move against Virginia Tech, Zeke’s countless runs for first downs, and our quarterbacks’ complete passes (thank you JT and Cardale). Let’s celebrate Women’s rowing for their 2015 National Championship. Let’s celebrate Asia Doss, who plays Women’s Basketball, who has been honored for this week’s Student-Athlete Spotlight. Let’s cheer on Men’s basketball this Saturday against Connecticut. Let’s cheer on our football team at the Fiesta Bowl.

As great as our disappointment is in not making the college football playoffs and being ranked #6 (first world problems, amiright?), let’s be grateful for what we do have. Let’s cheer on all of our Buckeyes in to reach their goals and ace their finals. Good luck to all of you.

9 Ways To Get Your Festivus On In Columbus

It’s officially December 1st, which means now is the chance to do all the winter and holiday things you can handle! Everyone enjoys this season in a different way, so get out there and enjoy it (instead of dreading the chill).


Here are nine ways you can get your festivus and winter feels on:

  1. Do you like holiday lights, but hate being outside in the cold? Then go to the Ohio Statehouse Holiday Festival and Tree Lighting on December 1 at 5:30! Zoo
  2. Take in the lights at Wildlights at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium! The lights are already up and will stay up until Jan. 3. They have millions of LED lights, 3 animated musical light shows, Santa, Mrs. Claus, and reindeer! And through Dtix in the Ohio Union you can get tickets for $10! What more could you want?
  3. What signifies cold weather more than hockey? The Blue Jackets have three games before the semester ends: vs. The Panthers December 4, vs. The New York Islanders December 12, vs. The Tampa Bay Lightning December 14. Ohio State’s Women’s Ice Hockey has 2 games against Minnesota Duluth on December 11 and 12.
  4. Kick off the holiday season with the Grand Illumination of Columbus as the Scioto Mile is lit up with thousands of lights! The ceremony starts at 5 p.m. on Dec. 4.
  5. Explore the Short North during their Holiday Hop on December 5! Enjoy an evening filled with sights, sounds, food, shopping, Santa, and surprises!
  6. Get a selfie with Rudolph! North Market will have reindeer outside on Dec. 6 from 12-3 p.m.GrandIllumination_FeatureImage
  7. Roam the historic streets of German Village and enjoy shops open late with holiday treats, discounts, and special offers during their Village Lights event. Festive surprises like carolers, live music, and a horse-drawn carriage are at every corner on Dec. 6 at 5 p.m.!
  8. Celebrate with the Ohio State community at Light Up The Lake on Dec. 9. There will be student performers, a motivational speakers, snacks, and holiday fun!
  9. Relax with friends and just enjoy the energy that comes with this time of year!


15 alternatives to the Mirror Lake jump

As you likely know by now, the Mirror Lake jump–a recent tradition that precedes the football game against TTUN–is slated to take place on Tuesday night. While many students may be participating (and will do so responsibly, we hope!), there are likely just as many–or more–of you who have no plans to splash around in dirty water in near-freezing temperatures. For those of you undecided about your Tuesday night plans, here are 15 alternatives to the Mirror Lake jump:

1. Get a head start on the drive home…all of the freeway lanes, none of the traffic.

2. Try out that Short North restaurant you’ve been eyeing since the start of the semester.

3. Create your own Thanksgiving meal using only items from a campus C-Store, a la “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving”:

4. Get a bird’s eye view of the jump (and your pick of the best rocking chair) from the 11th floor of Thompson library.

5. Listen to TBDBITL music on repeat…or at least until it starts to annoy your roommate(s).

6. Reread “The Hunger Games” in preparation for the final movie in the franchise…or just see the movie with your DTix discount at Gateway Film Center.

7. Watch the Ohio State Men’s basketball team take on Louisiana Tech on the Big Ten Network (8 p.m.).

8. Practice your response to holiday inquiries from family, questions like: 

What are you hoping to do with a major in [insert your major here]-

9. Try to get your own hashtag trending.

10. Wash your sheets…maybe for the first time all semester?

11. Watch all the Thanksgiving episodes of your favorite TV show(s).

12. Memorize random facts about Ohio State football players to show your true dedication to the game. For example:

Can you imagine how crowded the Jones family dinner table was when Cardale was a kid? I don’t know how he and his five siblings–Matthew, Javon, Devonte, Sheena and Naomi–all fit!

That Perry kid has got some moves…I guess that’s why he was in the top five in long jump at the Ohio high school state track and field championships. His parents, Jim and Georgette, must be so proud!

13. Create a playlist of the American Music Award winners for the drive/flight home (looking at you, 1D).

14. Stuff your face at PizzaPalooza (10 p.m.-midnight, Ohio Union west plaza).

15. Find at least eight of your closest friends to recreate this YouTube vid (admittedly more appropriate before our loss on Saturday):

Happy Beat M!ch!g@n Week, everyone!

Little Known Facts About Better Known Traditions

Whether the climate agrees or not, we’re past the halfway point of November already, and you know what that means? We’re less than a week away from The Game! Being a first-year student in such a spirited community of Buckeyes can be daunting from an academic standpoint, let alone having to learn traditions and other nuances that go into being a Buckeye through and through. Ever wanted to know how a few of these came to be some of the most recognizable traditions in the country? If so, today’s your lucky day!

Buckeye Grove

In a ceremony before the spring game, Buckeye trees are planted in Buckeye Grove for each Ohio State All-American football player from the previous season. Next time you’re over on West Campus, take a walk through the nature! Rumor has it that officials are renaming it “Buckeye Forest” because we have so many trees since WE’RE JUST THAT GOOD! (The last sentence is totally made up…except the part about us being awesome, because we are).

  • The original location of the grove was the southwest corner of the original stadium, but after renovations, the grove moved to its current location between Ohio Stadium, Morrill Tower, and the RPAC
  • Each tree has its own plaque, distinguishing the name of the player whom the tree is dedicated to
  • Since the Urban Meyer era of our football team, after the spring game, the players, coaches and administrators from the losing Scarlet team are in charge of cleaning up and sprucing up the grove as a way to raise the stakes in the spring game and do a good deed at the same time! Classic Urban.

 The “O-H! I-O!” Chant

Nowadays you can shout “O-H!” just about anywhere in Columbus the world and get an “I-O!” in response from some passing stranger. No joke, I was in Guam International Airport a few years back and I jokingly yelled out “O-H!” just for fun. Believe it or not, I got an “I-O”! Moral of the story is that time you’re on a random U.S. territorial island in the middle of the Pacific, give the ol’ O-H a shot, it’s guaranteed to work EVERY time. (Again, last sentence isn’t even close to being true so if you believed it for a second, that’s on you)

O-H-I-O with Big BenEaster Island

  • In 1942, a group of U.S. Navy sailors aboard the USS Lexington in the Pacific Ocean began chanting “O-H-I-O S-T-A-T-E” to the tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat.” Several of those displaced Buckeye fanatics returned to Ohio and enrolled at Ohio State in the fall of 1946.
  • One of them, Matthew Sidley, joined the cheerleading squad the following autumn. On Nov. 1, 1947, during a losing effort against Indiana, Sidley decided to teach the “O-H-I-O S-T-A-T-E” cheer to fans at Ohio Stadium.
  • The full nine-letter chant proved too difficult for the student body to keep up, so they eventually settled on chanting “O-H-I-O” and leaving it at that.
  • Apparently the cheer was so energizing to the players that 1947 OSU linebacker Dick Flanagan called it “…a turning point in Ohio State football.”
  • The cheer squad tried to bring back the original “O-H-I-O S-T-A-T-E” chant in 1982, but apparently a conglomerate of higher education individuals couldn’t wrap their head around spelling OHIO STATE to the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat. SMH.
  • The sailors who invented the “O-H-I-O” chant also created the hand symbols that have become a global phenomenon. Much creativity. Such wow.

 “Carmen Ohio”

Singing Carmen has got to be my favorite Buckeye tradition. The sense of pride swaying and singing along with 100,000 of your closest friends is almost indescribable! If you haven’t gotten the opportunity to check out a home football game yet, I highly recommend doing so even if you aren’t a football fan!

  • “Carmen” means song in Latin, so the title literally translates to “Song of Ohio”
  • “Carmen Ohio” is the oldest song still in use at Ohio State
  • Carmen was first performed by the Glee Club in 1903 after freshman four-letter athlete and Glee Club singer Fred Cornell re-wrote the lyrics to the tune of Christian H Bateman’s hymn “Come Christians, Join To Sing”.
  • Some say Cornell wrote the song on the train ride home after our Buckeyes suffered a brutal 86-0 loss to TTUN. Never again.
  • Carmen is sung after every single sporting event, win, lose, or draw!
  • In 1927, then band director Jack Evans and arranger Richard Heine adapted the song for the marching band to play and added the sound of the chimes from the Orton Hall bells as its intro

 Script Ohio

I’ve seen TBDBITL perform many a time in my days here at Ohio State, but every time they march out there, it mesmerizes me how perfect Script Ohio is! There’s a reason why it’s been called “The Greatest Tradition in College Football” In my opinion, there’s no way it doesn’t crack the top 10 greatest college traditions PERIOD. It’s definitely a sight to behold each and every time the Ohio State Marching Band takes the field.

  • The first marching band to form the word Ohio on a football field was actually *!ch!&an’s marching band! In 1932, those guys visited Ohio Stadium, and spelled out ‘OHIO’ during their halftime show
  • The famous Script Ohio made its debut four years later, on Oct. 10, 1936 at Ohio State’s football game against Pittsburgh. Band director Eugene J. Weigel had the idea for the formation after seeing the looping script Downtown at Loew’s Ohio Theatre

Each and every year, the last couple weeks of college football’s regular season gets me so excited (and not just because it means turkey and gravy). Being a part of something bigger than yourself is something that I believe is so important in everyone’s lives, and we all are so fortunate to have the opportunity to be Buckeyes at THE Ohio State University!

Orientation: Past, present and future

We’re just two short weeks away from the first day of orientation for new freshmen beginning their first year at Ohio State this fall. Let’s see where we’ve been and where we’re going with orientation programs.

The history of orientation programs dates back to the early days of higher education in the United States. Harvard College, founded in 1636, was the first institution to implement a system by which experienced students helped new students in their transition to campus. Along with a personal support system, new students were introduced to certain “rites of passage”, which would likely be considered hazing today.

Toward the end of the 19th century, Harvard maintained faculty contact with students by assigning faculty members administrative responsibilities outside the classroom; one of these responsibilities was the orientation of new students. It wasn’t long before other colleges across the country became invested in the concerns specific to freshman students.

Today’s orientation programs have evolved from merely providing individualized faculty attention to focusing on myriad issues while responding to the needs of an increasingly diverse student and family population.

Orientation at Ohio State

In 1926, Ohio State enrollment had already reach 10,000 students, more than 25 percent of whom were freshmen. Freshman Week – later known as Welcome Week – started in 1927 under the leadership of President Rightmire as a way to help acquaint students with campus, to engage students in fellowship with one another, and to improve student retention. By 1947, orientation was a formalized university program.

Two-day orientation programs began at Ohio State in 1961; our schedule in 2015 is a modern version of what existed 54 years ago, including small group activities, advising and course registration, placement testing, and student identification photos. Staffs of upperclass peer leaders have varied in size – ranging from 11 to 34 undergraduate students – and represent the diverse interests and backgrounds of the university student body.

This year’s class of new students will meet their FYE Peer Leader at orientation, and these Peer Leaders will continue to engage in outreach and relationship development throughout the new students’ entire first year at Ohio State.

We look forward to welcoming our new students to Ohio State this summer!

Freshman orientation, September 1953 (Photo courtesy of University Archives)

Freshman orientation, September 1953 (Photo courtesy of University Archives)


Time and change will surely show

Exploring spring commencement of years past.

JUNE 6, 2010

Speaker: David Gergen (read his commencement address)

In the headlines: Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama resigns after 10 months in office.

The buzz around campus: The new Ohio Union opens in March with great fanfare and festivity.

On the radio: OMG by Usher featuring

In theaters: Toy Story 3

TV premieres: Glee, Pretty Little Liars

JUNE 12, 2005

Speaker: William H. Hall (read his commencement address)

In the headlines: Pope John Paul II dies at age 84.

The buzz around campus: The South Campus Gateway is set to open in autumn 2005.

On the radio: We Belong Together by Mariah Carey.

In theaters: Batman Begins

TV premieres: The Office, Grey’s Anatomy

JUNE 9, 2000

Speaker: J.C. Watts (read his commencement address)

In the headlines: North Korea and South Korea begin conversations that ultimately lead to a peace accord.

The buzz around campus: The Dorothy M. Davis Heart & Lung Research Institute opens its doors.

On the radio: Maria Maria by Santana featuring The Product G&B

In theaters: Gone in Sixty Seconds

TV premieres: Malcolm in the Middle, Survivor

JUNE 9, 1995

Speaker: Shimon Peres (read his commencement address)

In the headlines: Death toll reaches 2,000 in Rwanda massacre.

The buzz around campus: Ohio State celebrates its 125th anniversary.

Birthday Cake on The Oval

On the radio: Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman by Bryan Adams

In theaters: Pocahontas

TV premieres: Singled Out, Road Rules

JUNE 8, 1990

Speaker: Edward H. Jennings (read his commencement address)

In the headlines: South Africa frees Nelson Mandela after more than 27 years in prison.

The buzz on campus: New university president E. Gordon Gee takes office (for the first time).

On the radio: Hold On by Wilson Phillips

In theaters: Dick Tracy

TV premieres: Twin Peaks, In Living Color


The Sweet 16: Facts about March Madness schools

The NCAA men’s basketball tournament season is upon us and my FYE colleague, Julie Richardson, and I are ready to get caught up in the madness that is college hoops; we also love the history, traditions, and fun facts that relate to American colleges and universities. Here, we share what we think are interesting tidbits for 16 schools participating in this year’s tournament.

(1) Villanova University (Villanova, PA)

Villanova boasts the largest student-run Special Olympics event in the world and is the official host of the Special Olympics Pennsylvania fall state games.

(2) Gonzaga University (Spokane, WA)

Gonzaga’s Crosby Student Center is named for crooner Bing Crosby who sang the holiday favorite, “White Christmas.” Crosby attended Gonzaga beginning in 1920 but left before graduating to pursue his singing career.

(3) Baylor University (Waco, TX)

For more than 60 years, Baylor University students have celebrated Dr. Pepper Hour with free Dr. Pepper every Tuesday afternoon from 3 to 4 p.m.

(4) Georgetown University (Washington, DC)

Established in 1789, Georgetown is the nation’s oldest Catholic and Jesuit university.

(5) University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA)

The mascots for Northern Iowa are TC (The Cat) Panther and TK (The Kitten) Panther.

(6) Butler University (Indianapolis, IN)

Bestselling author Kurt Vonnegut dropped out of Butler University in 1942 after failing to earn no higher than a C in his English classes.

(7) Wichita State University (Wichita, KS)

The Shocker bowling team has captured 19 national championships and attracts student bowlers from all over the world.

(8) San Diego State University (San Diego, CA)

President John F. Kennedy gave the commencement address at San Diego State in 1963 (just months before he was assassinated). The President received the university’s first honorary doctorate–also the first in the California State University system.

(9) Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN)

Amelia Earhart was a faculty member at Purdue from 1935 until her disappearance in July 1937. She served in the Department for the Study of Careers for Women and in the Department of Aeronautics.

(10) Davidson College (Davidson, NC)

Over Family Weekend during presidential election years, the Young Democrats and College Republicans debate about relevant issues across balconies of two campus buildings named for the first two student societies founded at the college, the Eumenean Society and the Philanthropic Society.

(11) The University of Texas (Austin, TX)

The University of Texas at Austin reports 4.7 million on-campus dining transaction per year, which includes serving 496,572 locally-made tortilla.

(12) Wofford College (Spartanburg, SC)

According to Sports Illustrated, Wofford (6) outranked Ohio State (7) in 2007 for best uniforms in college football.

(13) Harvard University (Cambridge, MA)

John Harvard’s statue famously presides over Harvard Yard–except it isn’t actually John Harvard. A stand-in, namely Sherman Hoar, sat in as the model.

(14) University at Albany, State University of New York (Albany, NY)

Albany has 1,248 columns on its Uptown Campus, one of three architecturally distinct campuses that comprise the university.

(15) Belmont University (Nashville, TN)

Belmont is home to the Mike Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business, which offers four areas of study in Music Business, Audio Engineering Technology, Entertainment Industry Studies, and Songwriting.

(16) Coastal Carolina University (Conway, SC)

In 2014 Costal Carolina University was one of three college campuses in the country selected to receive a mobile Starbucks Coffee truck.


Good luck to all teams participating in this year’s men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, and especially to our 5-seed Buckeye women’s team and our 10-seed Buckeye men’s team!

Scarlet Scramble is Back

Did you know University Hall is the real building used as Hollis College in Pretty Little Liars? Or that the first Wendy’s restaurant ever opened was in Columbus? Do you think you can eat a stack of Sloopy’s pancakes faster than anyone else? Then boy do I have an event for you — Scarlet Scramble 2015 is here!

So what is Scarlet Scramble?

It’s a 24-hour campus and city adventure that includes challenges, trivia questions, and clues to decode. Teams compete from 6 p.m. on March 27 to 6 p.m. on March 28 to earn points and win prizes (like Amazon and HOMAGE gift cards). The Scramble is brought to you by First Year Experience, and each team should have at least five first year students, but can have up to five other students (non first-years) too.

You know you want a new HOMAGE shirt.

You know you want a new HOMAGE shirt.

I participated in my first Scarlet Scramble my freshman year and have helped plan it the last two years. It is one of my favorite events on campus because not only do you get a sweet T-shirt just for signing up, you also get to run around campus with your friends, learn something new while you’re doing it, and compete for prizes! Plus you end up with some pretty cool pictures like these.

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2013

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2013

TBT to Scar Scram 2014

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2014

To learn more about #ScarScram2015, check out the video below!

Registration is open until March 9. To sign up for the best time of your life visit

See you March 27!

BuckeyeThon: One Team, One Dream, One Million

This is a special year for BuckeyeThon. This year, BuckeyeThon is trying to raise $1,000,000 For The Kids.

That’s right — 6 zeros.

The dancers are giving it their all to accomplish this incredible goal, with the hope of forever changing the lives of kids fighting cancer.

As a former participant, I am here to answer some questions I know I definitely had before doing the dance marathon. Some commonly asked questions:

What exactly is BuckeyeThon? 

BuckeyeThon is Ohio State’s largest student-run philanthropy, which raises funds year-round for the fight against pediatric cancer. All of the donations go toward supporting the kids who are treated on the Hematology/Oncology/BMT Department at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Some events sponsored by BuckeyeThon include CarnOval, Extra Life, High School Dance Marathon, Miracle Miles 5K and, biggest of all, BuckeyeThon: The Dance Marathon.

On February 6-7th, more than 4,000 Ohio State students will participate in the dance marathon! This is the largest number of participants to date Students are required to raise a minimum of $100 to participate, but they are encouraged to raise more. All efforts are made in order to bring the year’s goal one step closer!

I’ve never done a Dance Marathon (DM) before, what is it? And do I need to know how to dance? 

A dance marathon is basically a 24-hour long event, which is broken up into two, 12-hour shifts. The Scarlet Half happens from Friday night to Saturday morning, and the Gray Half happens from Saturday morning to Saturday night. Participants choose their shift during registration.

You definitely do not need to know how to dance! No one cares what you look like dancing or what kind of crazy, wacky dance moves you have because everyone is their to support the Miracle Kids. Also, a dance marathon is a LOT more than just dancing!

Throughout the event, you will not only dance, but you can do other fun and hands-on activities as well. For example, students can meet the Miracle Kids for whom they are dancing, donate their hair, do yoga and maybe even meet Miss Ohio!

Not only are activities provided, but so is food. Dancers are given two full meals and a snack during the event. So don’t worry about packing a meal, but definitely pack a snack, just in case.


Why should I do it? 

If you’re still asking yourself that after I just described all these awesome events, just remember:

Buckeyethon 1

What should I wear?

Everyone is put on a color team, so you basically wear the colors of your team. I would suggest having fun with your outfits because people go all out for this event! And, this might be only time in your life that you can wear a tutu for almost 12 hours.

Dress (comfortably) to impress! I suggest you wear comfortable shoes. You will be required to stand for the whole shift, and thus sensible footwear is a must.

Also: if you own a fanny pack, this is the time to blow the dust off of it and put it to good use! Fanny packs are so handy because they don’t interfere with your ability to dance and have fun and they also can hold important items such as your phone and some money.

What should I bring? 

  • BuckID
  • Phone and Charger: You need that phone to be fully charged so that you can document all the fun you’re having! (Pictures or it didn’t happen, right?)
  • Cash or Credit: So you can wear some of BuckeyeThon’s apparel, and look super fly after the DM
  • Snacks: Cannot emphasize this enough, you’ll need to keep your energy up for 12 hours, it’s good to be prepared
  • Deoderant: I’ll just leave it at that

Any other tips? 

Make sure you get plenty of sleep before your shift! Remember this is a marathon and no one starts a marathon running on a couple hours of sleep.

Meet someone new at the DM. Being in the Union for 12 hours, you’re bound to meet someone new and who knows, maybe by the end of your shift, you could leave with a new friend.

Most importantly, HAVE FUN! The Dance Marathon only happens once every year and what better way to kick off spring semester than by supporting BuckeyeThon and taking a stand against pediatric cancer.


Final thoughts…

Last year, I participated in the Dance Marathon and it was definitely the highlight of my freshman year. I remember the opening ceremony where we got to meet all the Miracle Kids, and they were so adorable and looked so happy to be there! I knew at that moment that I was not only doing it for them but I was also doing it to for their families.

I danced and laughed the night away. During the event, I got the chance to meet so many inspirational dancers whose families have been affected by pediatric cancer. Listening to their stories made me realize how important this dance marathon is  to the Ohio State community and I was truly glad to be a part of it all.

So maybe you’re not going home for Thanksgiving…

So maybe you’re not going home for Thanksgiving… and you’re probably worried that you’ll be stuck on campus with nothing to do while everyone else is at home with families and friends. Last year I stayed on campus for Thanksgiving weekend and instead of just sitting alone in my residence hall the entire time, I made the effort to stay busy on campus by attending different events. As a result, I used the time to meet new people and support my fellow Buckeyes! So from personal experience, I strongly recommend that you check out some of these exciting opportunities.

Here are my top events to attend over Thanksgiving weekend this year:

1. PizzaPalooza, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25 at the Ohio Union West Plaza

Do you love being a Buckeye? Do you love pizza? Why not combine the two and enjoy free pizza at the Ohio Union West Plaza with many of your fellow Buckeyes. This event is free for students!


2. Ohio State Men’s Basketball Game vs. Campbell, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 26 at the Schottenstein Center

Maybe volleyball isn’t really your thing. Consider checking out our men’s basketball team take on Campbell University at the Schottenstein Center. This event is not free for students, but you can buy tickets at the Schottenstein leading up to the game. Here’s a tip: the ticket office has a limited number of $10 tickets available starting an hour before tipoff.

photo 1

3. Ohio State Women’s Volleyball Game vs. Minnesota, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 26 at St. John Arena

Don’t have anything to do on Wednesday night? Consider checking out the Women’s Volleyball game at St. John Arena. The games are free for students, all you need is your BuckID. Support the Buckeyes in their last home game of the season and their senior night. Do not worry if you don’t know anything about volleyball, the games are fun for everyone!

4. 23rd Annual Thanksgiving Dinner, 11:45 and 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 28 in the Ohio Union

Perhaps you were worried that you weren’t going to get your fill of turkey if you’re not going home. Have no fear, you can enjoy a free Thanksgiving dinner at the Ohio Union. Seating for the dinner will take place at 11:45 a.m. and 2 p.m. and all guests must have a ticket to enter. Tickets are free and are available in 100 Oxley Hall, the Hale Black Cultural Center (Tuesday until 10 p.m. and Wednesday until 5 p.m.) and the Ohio Union Information Center (Tuesday until 10 p.m. and Wednesday until 8 p.m.). There will be about 1600 other Buckeyes, so make sure if you’re around to join in on this wonderful free event!!


5. Ohio State Men’s Basketball Game vs. James Madison, 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 28 at the Schottenstein Center

After you get your fill of Black Friday shopping in Friday morning, consider attending the Men’s Basketball game at 4 p.m. Again this is not a free event for students, but you can buy tickets at the door and there are a limited number of $10 day of game tickets available an hour before the game. What better way to prepare for the game on Saturday against That Team Up North than supporting the rest of your fellow Buckeyes!