Join a North Central Region NUEL’s Action Team

The North Central Region of NUEL is seeking a vibrant, forward thinker to participate in national discussions focused on sustaining an integrated approach to urban Extension.

As an Action Team representative for the North Central Region you will be asked to participate in each of the quarterly regional meetings and the monthly NUEL Steering Committee meetings. Your role during the meetings will be to share and explore ideas aimed to strategically enhance urban Extension’s relevance locally, responsiveness statewide, and recognition nationally. This role will require, on average, four hours of your time per month. This is a great opportunity to highlight your knowledge and skills while advocating for yourself and your urban Extension peers.

If you are interested in becoming an Action Team representative, please email a 250-word bio that highlights your commitment to urban Extension, which Action Team you would like to contribute to, and why you are perfect for this position. Send this information to Nicole at debose.8@osu.edu no later than September 29. This position carries a 3-year term and will begin on January 1, 2021. The Action Teams are listed on the NUEL website.

For any question, please reach out to Nicole Debose.8.

Sourced from: NUEL

More Than a Token: Urban Agriculture Has Much to Offer Close to Home

Jodi Kushins, of Over the Fence Urban Farm, knows she doesn’t grow a lot compared to some farms. She feeds about 20 households through her CSA program, with 2,500 square feet in her yard and her neighbor’s yard. “It’s like a drop in the bucket,” she said. “Seeing a semi truck full of produce and then thinking about the very, very tiny amount of food I’m able to produce in my yard definitely gives me pause.”

Kushin’s farm is one of more than 30 in Columbus, up from about five in 2014. Urban agriculture is driven by desires for food security and fresh foods, vacant land in post-industrial areas and interest in connecting with farmers, said Mike Hogan,  Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Franklin County. “We know we’re not gonna feed the world with urban agriculture,” Hogan said. But Hogan believes that urban agriculture needs to be part of the city food systems. In Cleveland, about 80% of the vacant land could provide 20% of all the produce needed. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Farm and Dairy

Next-Gen Transportation Isn’t Going Anywhere Without Data

Effectively operating the transportation systems of tomorrow is going to take more than thoughtful planning; it’s also going to require a lot of good data, experts say. This process is already playing out with the wide adoption of standardized methods for collecting and using transportation data, namely through open-source software and the Mobility Data Specification (MDS), which lays out a road map to connect mobility companies with local governments. MDS is often credited with making emerging forms of mobility – bikes, e-scooters, rentable and sharable cars, integrated mobility options within the larger transportation ecosystem. These specifications are in use by about 90 cities around the world. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Governing

Which Cities Became More (and Less) Racially and Economically Inclusive Over the Past Few Years?

A few years ago, The Urban Institute explored how 274 of the largest U.S. cities ranked on racial, economic, and overall inclusion across four decades. They defined inclusion as the opportunity for all residents to contribute to and benefit from economic prosperity. Journalists, advocates, city leaders, and practitioners then used the data feature and report to reflect upon their policies and programs and to hold leaders accountable to inclusion goals. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Urban Institute

Multicultural Self-Awareness Workshop: Online Version

During this multi-day virtual Multicultural Self-Awareness Workshop, participants will explore ways in which to view interactions with people different from themselves. The emphasis is on differences rather than similarities. The workshop focuses on the individual and helps explore belief systems about multiculturalism to identify feelings and values from a multicultural perspective. This intensive learning experience focuses on increasing awareness of several areas of prejudice, discrimination and oppression, including racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, and ableism. Participants are encouraged to reflect on how they’ve learned to think about human differences and on the widespread tendency to view differences within a monocultural view of “better than/less than” thinking. In addition, participants have opportunities to apply what they’re learning to their work and begin to create a plan moving forward. This workshop is being held January 13, 14, 20, 21, 2021 and is open to non-MSU Extension staff and community partners.  Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Michigan State University

Using ArcGIS StoryMaps in Your Research and Teaching

Want to make a map that will help you share the stories being uncovered through your research and make them accessible to a broader audience? Want to give your students an opportunity to engage with spatial thinking and work on an exciting digital project? ArcGIS StoryMaps allow you to weave an inspiring and interactive narrative by combining text, maps, and multimedia content – images, videos, and embeds – to communicate information through engaging and user-friendly web mapping applications. This self-paced, 100% online workshop should take approximately 90 minutes to complete beginning on September 14, 2020. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: CURA

Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens –  the majority of them nervous, wearing masks, and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors, found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Next City

Ohio Victory Gardens Program Kicks Off

Victory Gardens originated during World War I, an answer to a severe food shortage at the time. The idea was wildly successful, growing an army of amateur gardeners and serving to boost morale and patriotism. ODA and OSU Extension are reviving the effort and once again encouraging people to plant seeds, realize the fruits of their labor, and share with others if inspired. Advice and resources on every aspect of planting and harvesting produce are available at the Ohio Victory Gardens website.

“At a time when many people are spending more time at home with their families, we saw revitalizing the concept of Victory Gardens as an enjoyable, interactive way to learn about growing your own nutritious food that can be made into meals everyone can enjoy,” said Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda. “This is a great way for anyone to start a new hobby and to have a little fun while learning an important life skill.” Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Morning Ag Clips.