Nutrition Considerations for Smart Aging: Webinar

Approximately 80% of older adults have at least one chronic disease that directly impacts their quality of life. This webinar will discuss how nutrition affects the quality of life in older adults, and what can lead to poor nutrition in later life. An Introduction to the Aging and Eating curriculum will be presented by Jenny Lobb and Kathy Tutt. The webinar will take place Friday, December 6, 2019. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The North Central Region Aging Network

Disrupting Food Insecurity

An estimated 40 million Americans—including 12.5 million children—struggle with food insecurity, meaning they can’t afford an adequate diet. Federal nutrition programs and charitable meals make up the first line of defense, but solving this challenge will require communities to go beyond food to disrupt the root causes of economic distress. This dashboard equips counties with data about their food insecurity levels and related risk factors, identifies cross-cutting opportunities for intervention, and groups counties by shared challenges. Dive into your county’s data and explore strategies tailored to your county. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Urban Institute

6 New Cities to Address Health Hazards in Housing

Health and success begin at home, yet millions of Americans live in housing that is making them sick. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning and asthma. NLC is committed to supporting member efforts to provide safe and affordable housing for every family. NLC has selected six cities through a competitive application process to come together on health hazards in housing. The Healthy Housing City Leaders’ Forum will first convene in Charlotte, North Carolina in December. The six participating cities are:

  • Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Bloomington, Illinois
  • Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Detroit, Michigan
  • Durham, North Carolina
  • Jersey City, New Jersey

Each city has convened a cross-sector team that includes city department heads, implementers, and health partners. With the generous support of The JPB Foundation, this initiative will enable city teams to develop and implement a targeted action plan to improve housing conditions in their community. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak

Expanding Childcare to Promote Economic Development and Housing

Fort Collins, Colorado entered the Cities of Opportunity pilot cohort, an initiative to work in a comprehensive way to improve health and equity, with the intention to focus on housing. The city’s team evolved to focus instead on childcare availability, exemplifying the Cities of Opportunity approach to meet cities where they are. The Fort Collins team intentionally reached out to partners to be supportive and not duplicative of what is already happening in this area. NLC spoke with Sue Beck-Ferkiss, social policy and housing programs manager with the City of Fort Collins, about how their team identified affordable childcare as a key need and pivoted to most effectively expanding it in their city. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak

Meet the Low-Wage Workforce

Jobs play a central role in the lives of most adults. As forces like globalization and automation reshape the labor market, it is clear that some people and places are positioned to do well while others risk becoming collateral damage. The well-educated and technically savvy find ample employment opportunities, while those with lower levels of education face a labor market that is decidedly less welcoming, with lower wages and less potential for career growth. Meanwhile, some regions dramatically outpace others in job growth, incomes, and productivity, raising disquieting questions about how best to promote broad-based economic growth. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Brookings

Solving Unsheltered Homelessness

On any given night, there are over half a million people experiencing homelessness in America, including 36,000 unaccompanied youth. According to the recent The State of Homelessness in America report, over one-third of all homeless people are living unsheltered on the street, in cars or in other places unfit for human habitation. While most Americans experiencing homelessness can find shelter at local emergency and transitional housing facilities, or with family and friends, the number of unsheltered individuals and families has increased for the third year in a row. This recent uptick in people living in unsheltered places has very visibly manifested itself in the growth and proliferation of homeless encampments in cities across the country. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak 

Think Beyond Summit: Urban Universities + Thriving Communities

Urban Universities + Thriving Communities Communities flourish when everyone within them has the opportunity to flourish.

 

 

Communities flourish when everyone within them has the opportunity to flourish. When urban-serving universities and communities join forces, we can confront the complexities of education, healthcare, economic, and human development in order to:

  • Prepare an increasingly diverse workforce to successfully navigate careers through technological, economic, and social change.
  • Assess, treat, and prevent urban health risks for increasingly diverse populations.
  • Create sustainable solutions for continued and inclusive growth that improve the quality of life in our communities.

Join educators, industry, nonprofit, and community leaders at The Ohio State University on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. EST in the Ohio Union to exchange ideas and reinvigorate the collective efforts toward strengthening and sustaining vibrant, inclusive communities. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Ohio State University 

Three Things Cities Could Do Immediately to Make Cities More Affordable

Cities are becoming increasingly unaffordable. Almost a million New York City renters are rent-burdened, with more than half of those renters paying more than 50% of their income in rent. Urban rents have been climbing faster than wages for decades, a trend that has only accelerated over the past 10 years. With that in mind, it’s not surprising that the populations of large, expensive cities like New York and Los Angeles are dropping for the first time in decades.In addition to the human impact, the economic cost of high rent is substantial. High rents prevent people from moving to areas of economic opportunity, limiting growth, and constraining socioeconomic mobility. Studies estimate that real GDP could be 9% higher if New York City and San Francisco alone built sufficient housing. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: New Cities