NAEPSDP Presents: Virtual Summer School

 

All Extension professionals are invited to join this informative webinar series on incorporating Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion into Extension programs from planning to evaluation. The webinar series will begin Monday, July 13, 2020 at 3 p.m. EDT. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: NAEPSDP

 

Enhancing Tree Health in Water Sensitive Urban Design: Role of Mycorrhizae Webinar

This project investigated the effects of adding a mycorrhizal fungal inoculant on three plants species growing in stormwater biofilters. They evaluated the impacts on both plant establishment and on plant stress and pollutant removal after two durations of drought. The results found that adding mycorrhizae had minimal impact on plant growth and stress tolerance of the tree species, Melaleuca ericifolia, and had a similar impact on sedge species. Interestingly, different species reacted differently to inoculant addition with regards to water quality improvement. Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus was improved with added inoculant in one of the sedge species both before and after a two-week dry period. These results show that mycorrhizal inoculants may be a promising amendment to biofiltration systems for improving water quality, but are less likely to improve plant health and tolerance to drought. The webinar is being held Tuesday, July 14, 2020 at 5 p.m. EDT. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: TREE Fund

Social Equity Impact of COVID-19 on Communities – Panel Discussion

Social Equity Impact of COVID-19 on Communities a panel discussion will be the third in a series of events on “Cities and Regions in the Post-Coronavirus Era,” initiating community conversations on what lessons can be learned from the crisis to create a more resilient and sustainable world. This webinar will be held on July 31, 2020, 12-1 p.m EDT. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: CURA

Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality

Extreme heat and its health impacts are on the rise. Annually, extreme heat already causes more deaths in the United States than all other weather-related causes combined, with effects most pronounced in urban areas. Reducing urban heat exposure is an equity issue. In this webinar (July 8, 2020, 1-2:15 p.m. EDT), speakers will introduce the efforts of the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC) – a multi-disciplinary, national partnership of researchers and practitioners working to understand and implement urban cooling strategies and the heat-health impacts on the human body. Follow this link to connect to the webinar.

Sourced from the U.S. Forest Service

Healthy Corner Stores: Response to COVID-19 and Emerging Best Practices

The Healthy Food Access Portal and The Food Trust’s Center for Healthy Food Access are hosting the webinar Healthy Corner Stores: Response to COVID-19 and Emerging Best Practices today (Wednesday, July 1) from 4 to 5 p.m. EDT.

Moderated by the Food Trust’s Juan Vila, this webinar will focus on how healthy corner store programming across the country has shifted in response to COVID-19, and what emerging best practices are being used to assist store owners. Guest speakers will include Robert Alsburg of Community Outreach and Patient Empowerment (COPE), and Ana Ramos and Jen Tepel of the Food Trust.

Click here to register

Sourced from: The Food Trust

Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality

In this webinar, Edith de Guzman will introduce the efforts of the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC), a multi-disciplinary, national partnership of researchers and practitioners working to understand and implement urban cooling strategies in Los Angeles. Dr. David Eisenman will discuss heat-health impacts on the human body and how choices made in urban environments may prevent heat-related illness and death. Dr. Larry Kalkstein will present methods and findings of a recently-completed LAUCC modeling study revealing how various tree cover and solar reflectance “prescriptions” in L.A. could delay warming impacts and reduce heat-related mortality, temperature, humidity, and oppressive air masses that lead to increased deaths, and how this work could have relevance elsewhere. This webinar is free and open to the public. The webinar will be held on July 8, 2020 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. EDT. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: eXtension

Growing Atlanta Suburb Reclaiming an Unexpected Public Space

If city-dwellers wanted to visit a green space in the 19th century, they likely found themselves at a cemetery. During much of that time, cemeteries played the role that city parks often do today, acting as a spot for people to gather. But increasingly over the past decade, communities have once again embraced hanging out in cemeteries. “Kennesaw was looking for ways to instead of fencing off to make it more accessible to their citizens,” says Holly Vine, executive assistant at the Atlanta Regional Commission planning agency. The city worked with ARC to gauge resident opinion and make the publicly owned Kennesaw City Cemetery into a green space for its burgeoning downtown. The cemetery, whose earliest known burial dates to 1863, has some prominent residents who contributed to Kennesaw’s founding. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Next City

Letting Data Lead the Way: Addressing Food and Internet Access in Syracuse

Even a few months into lockdown, we are still figuring out new ways to live, learn, work, and play. In every major facet of society, we are watching as the systems that once kept us going are breaking down. One particular area of focus has been on public education as schools close their doors and scramble to move classes online. The headlines highlight students and teachers struggling to adapt to this new mode of learning, and parents struggling to manage their kids, work, and household responsibilities simultaneously. Some school districts are choosing to shut down for the year, unable to make the transition to remote learning; some parents have flat out given up on homeschooling, unable to deal with the demands of work and their kids’ classes. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Data-Smart City Solutions