Solving Unsheltered Homelessness

On any given night, there are over half a million people experiencing homelessness in America, including 36,000 unaccompanied youth. According to the recent The State of Homelessness in America report, over one-third of all homeless people are living unsheltered on the street, in cars or in other places unfit for human habitation. While most Americans experiencing homelessness can find shelter at local emergency and transitional housing facilities, or with family and friends, the number of unsheltered individuals and families has increased for the third year in a row. This recent uptick in people living in unsheltered places has very visibly manifested itself in the growth and proliferation of homeless encampments in cities across the country. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak 

Think Beyond Summit: Urban Universities + Thriving Communities

Urban Universities + Thriving Communities Communities flourish when everyone within them has the opportunity to flourish.

 

 

Communities flourish when everyone within them has the opportunity to flourish. When urban-serving universities and communities join forces, we can confront the complexities of education, healthcare, economic, and human development in order to:

  • Prepare an increasingly diverse workforce to successfully navigate careers through technological, economic, and social change.
  • Assess, treat, and prevent urban health risks for increasingly diverse populations.
  • Create sustainable solutions for continued and inclusive growth that improve the quality of life in our communities.

Join educators, industry, nonprofit, and community leaders at The Ohio State University on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. EST in the Ohio Union to exchange ideas and reinvigorate the collective efforts toward strengthening and sustaining vibrant, inclusive communities. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Ohio State University 

Urban October: Using Mixed Reality Technology for Inclusive and Participatory Planning

The fingerprints of the digital revolution are becoming increasingly evident in the work of urban planning. Big data, the internet of things, and sensor networks offer new ways for urban managers to make informed decisions. Autonomous vehicles and drones will change mobility infrastructure in cities. The availability of satellite imagery and digital urban maps are revolutionizing the way that city extensions are planned to ensure job proximity for new urban residents and improved transportation. The sharing economy is creating new job opportunities and ways to make business as cities become increasingly dynamic. In recognizing the potential of digital technologies to contribute to urban sustainability, the UN’s New Urban Agenda asks member states to commit to “adopting a smart-city approach that makes use of opportunities from digitization, clean energy, and technologies.” Follow this link to learn more.

Soured from: UN-Habitat

Philadelphia Demonstrates the Power of Play for Child and City Development

A community member shared an astute assessment about how to transform a street corner in the Belmont community in West Philadelphia into a space with learning opportunities for young children. The result has become known as “Urban Thinkscape,” a collaboration between the Belmont community, Temple University’s Infant and Child Laboratory, and architect Itai Palti to build engaging learning opportunities directly into places families frequently go. On what was once a regular city street corner, there are now puzzles incorporating images of Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders into the back wall behind benches where families wait for the bus. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Brookings

The Coalition for Urban and Metropolitan Universities Conference Recap

The Coalition for Urban and Metropolitan Universities Conference (CUMU) was held in Philadelphia on October 20-23. CUMU is one of the nations largest and long-running organizations committed to serving and connecting the world’s urban and metropolitan universities to address the unique challenges faced in urban environments. The Ohio State University is a member of the coalition. The conference brought together many high-level partner universities, city governments and non-profit organizations to discuss how community engagement can be leveraged to serve our collective client residents. Learning about the different perspectives was a valuable experience for me as an attendee. I enjoyed seeing how Extension can provide outreach and education to serve the Land Grant mission of Ohio State while learning how other stakeholders address their own client needs. I highly recommend this conference as a unique and valuable experience to gain insight on how other partner institutions address the challenges that are faced in urban and metropolitan environments. Follow this link to learn more.

Article Courtesy of Timothy McDermott, Extension Educator, Franklin County Ohio.

Invitation: Discussion About School-Family-Community Engagement

Join James S. Bates, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Extension Field Specialist, Family Wellness and the team at the Ohio Statewide Family Engagement Center for a brainstorm discussion via Zoom on Friday, November 8, 2019 at 10 a.m. to learn about your experiences related to school-family-community engagement in the communities and schools you serve. They are also interested in your feedback on an infographic toolkit they would like to develop around school-family-community engagement. For those who are not able to attend but would still like to be part of this initiative, please feel free to email Dr. James Bates at bates.402@osu.edu or Dr. Barbara Boone at boone.32@osu.edu with your thoughts. Viewing the recording may prompt additional thoughts you could share.

Below is the outline for the meeting:

  • Welcome and Introduction
  • Introduce Topic:
  • What is school-family-community engagement?
  • How does it help families and communities?
  • How did FCS Extension become involved?
  • Open discussion of the following:
  • Introduce the infographic material
  • What topics related to school-family engagement might be of interest to schools, families, community?
  • Delivery options for the curriculum?
  • Other community resources?
  • Close

Zoom Meeting Information:

https://osu.zoom.us/j/8739675185
One tap mobile: +16468769923,,8739675185# US
Dial by your location: +1 646 876 9923 US, Meeting ID: 873 967 5185

Preparing for Drones to Fly in Cities

Drones, or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), are regulated for aircraft safety and flight operations under the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Many cities, municipalities, and states add their own regulations related to their areas of traditional authority. Traditional city and state authorities include:

  • planning and zoning for land-use,
  • determining take-off and landing locations for drones,
  • law enforcement operations and community safety, and
  • privacy policies and considerations.

Cities will not be on the sidelines as drones take flight. Updates to current regulations and safety decisions at FAA are in progress, but to get ahead of the next transportation technology shift, cities should prepare and consider their role to make the most of this new technology. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak

When it Comes to Housing Solutions, City Size Isn’t the Only Factor

When we think about the issues cities are facing, we tend to categorize challenges and solutions by city size. After all, it makes sense that a community with a population of 2,000 would require different solutions than cities the size of New York or Los Angeles. But while this approach holds some merit, the truth is that when addressing issues like housing and homelessness, size is just one piece of the puzzle. In the new report by NLC – Housing Market Conditions Across America’s Cities, they found when we put population count aside and focus on other characteristics, the housing crisis in cities like Columbia, Missouri (population: 123,180) and New York City (population: 8.623 million) begin to look similar despite differences in size and geography. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak