Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality

Extreme heat and its health impacts are on the rise. Annually, extreme heat already causes more deaths in the United States than all other weather-related causes combined, with effects most pronounced in urban areas. Reducing urban heat exposure is an equity issue. In this webinar (July 8, 2020, 1-2:15 p.m. EDT), speakers will introduce the efforts of the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC) – a multi-disciplinary, national partnership of researchers and practitioners working to understand and implement urban cooling strategies and the heat-health impacts on the human body. Follow this link to connect to the webinar.

Sourced from the U.S. Forest Service

Healthy Corner Stores: Response to COVID-19 and Emerging Best Practices

The Healthy Food Access Portal and The Food Trust’s Center for Healthy Food Access are hosting the webinar Healthy Corner Stores: Response to COVID-19 and Emerging Best Practices today (Wednesday, July 1) from 4 to 5 p.m. EDT.

Moderated by the Food Trust’s Juan Vila, this webinar will focus on how healthy corner store programming across the country has shifted in response to COVID-19, and what emerging best practices are being used to assist store owners. Guest speakers will include Robert Alsburg of Community Outreach and Patient Empowerment (COPE), and Ana Ramos and Jen Tepel of the Food Trust.

Click here to register

Sourced from: The Food Trust

Rx for Hot Cities: Urban Greening and Cooling to Reduce Heat-Related Mortality

In this webinar, Edith de Guzman will introduce the efforts of the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC), a multi-disciplinary, national partnership of researchers and practitioners working to understand and implement urban cooling strategies in Los Angeles. Dr. David Eisenman will discuss heat-health impacts on the human body and how choices made in urban environments may prevent heat-related illness and death. Dr. Larry Kalkstein will present methods and findings of a recently-completed LAUCC modeling study revealing how various tree cover and solar reflectance “prescriptions” in L.A. could delay warming impacts and reduce heat-related mortality, temperature, humidity, and oppressive air masses that lead to increased deaths, and how this work could have relevance elsewhere. This webinar is free and open to the public. The webinar will be held on July 8, 2020 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. EDT. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: eXtension

Growing Atlanta Suburb Reclaiming an Unexpected Public Space

If city-dwellers wanted to visit a green space in the 19th century, they likely found themselves at a cemetery. During much of that time, cemeteries played the role that city parks often do today, acting as a spot for people to gather. But increasingly over the past decade, communities have once again embraced hanging out in cemeteries. “Kennesaw was looking for ways to instead of fencing off to make it more accessible to their citizens,” says Holly Vine, executive assistant at the Atlanta Regional Commission planning agency. The city worked with ARC to gauge resident opinion and make the publicly owned Kennesaw City Cemetery into a green space for its burgeoning downtown. The cemetery, whose earliest known burial dates to 1863, has some prominent residents who contributed to Kennesaw’s founding. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Next City

Letting Data Lead the Way: Addressing Food and Internet Access in Syracuse

Even a few months into lockdown, we are still figuring out new ways to live, learn, work, and play. In every major facet of society, we are watching as the systems that once kept us going are breaking down. One particular area of focus has been on public education as schools close their doors and scramble to move classes online. The headlines highlight students and teachers struggling to adapt to this new mode of learning, and parents struggling to manage their kids, work, and household responsibilities simultaneously. Some school districts are choosing to shut down for the year, unable to make the transition to remote learning; some parents have flat out given up on homeschooling, unable to deal with the demands of work and their kids’ classes. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Data-Smart City Solutions

Addressing Power Inequity in Research to Create Change

Research cannot be excluded from conversations about systemic racism. We rely on the research process to expose systemic issues and guide us toward solutions. But deeply rooted in this process is a power dynamic, an aspect of research that dims its idealism when examined up close. It is our responsibility, then, to put in the work—examining our methods for harmful and disempowering practices, acknowledging them, and committing to a new approach. Research, even in pursuit of equity, isn’t exempt from racial and ethnic discrimination. Since the Urban Institute’s founding 50 years ago by then-president Lyndon B. Johnson, we’ve had to reckon with the behavior and the environment that shaped our founding principles. But beyond good intentions, the solution requires critical evaluation, explicit action, and accountability measures, often disruptive and uncomfortable, to effectively dismantle racist structures. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Urban Institute

Five Questions About Race

Do you want to improve your racial awareness but don’t know where to start? Join Cuyahoga County 4-H Extension Professionals Imani Scruggs and Rob Isner in this weekly series. Imani and Rob discuss in a non-formal, non-judgmental space a variety of topics on each other’s respective races that they (and possibly you) have always been curious about. They will post weekly videos so you can watch the conversation. Follow Cuyahoga County Extension on social media to add to the dialogue. Follow this link to view Episode 1 and Episode 2. 

Sourced from: Cuyahoga County Extension

Public Space a “Lifeline” for Post-Lockdown Cities

Public and outdoor space has been at a premium during the coronavirus pandemic: bike sales have leapt, park use is way up, and even pavement chalk drawing appears to be having a moment. Now as many cities start to reopen, some are looking at their sidewalks, squares, parking lots, and even streets as a hidden asset in boosting their economies. “The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed our relationship with our streets, open public spaces, and public facilities,” said Laura Petrella, chief of planning, finance, and economy at UN-Habitat. “Public space has emerged as a critical lifeline for cities and their residents,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Thomas Reuters Foundation News